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#1 StephanieL

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Posted 16 August 2006 - 03:06 PM

After describing my week thus far to my friend as "craptacular", it got me thinking about expressions that may have been dreamed up by us or our families, which would make no sense to anyone else. For instance, when I was a kid, our local trash hauler was a company called Sano. My dad then started using the phrase "the Sano touch" as the opposite of "the Midas touch" (i.e., everything a person touched turned to garbage). Of course, other expressions I used to think were unique to our family turned out to just be Yiddish phrases. :huh:

Anyone else have some good ones?

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#2 Lippy

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Posted 16 August 2006 - 03:10 PM

Ranitidine, as a child, came up with "forbizzio," meaning an edict forbidding something. I think it should enter the language.

#3 Melonious Thunk

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Posted 16 August 2006 - 03:18 PM

When I was a kid in the Bronx (1940s)it was common for families to have a "family whistle." If we were in a crowd, at the beach or similar situations, we'd whistle the short three bar tune and wait for an answer. I think this was common among the first and second generation Jewish immigrant families from Eastern Europe. I've not come across this elsewhere (except for birds).
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#4 Abbylovi

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Posted 16 August 2006 - 03:31 PM

Yes, we have a whistle too!
It is better to have beans and bacon in peace than cakes and ale in fear.

#5 mongo_jones

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Posted 16 August 2006 - 03:33 PM

i don't know if someone in my extended family came up with this phrase to describe people who eat a lot but remain thin but i've certainly never heard anyone outside it use it: "khaaye kaum, haage beshi". literally translated: "shits more than they eat".

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current whisky review: rampur select casks (indian single malt whisky)

 

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#6 GordonCooks

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Posted 16 August 2006 - 03:35 PM

We use the word "Gank" a lot. As in "robbed" of something or left out. Started as a bartending term meaning didn't get a tip.

I.e. - Aren't there any cookies left? I got ganked!
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Photography is jazz for the eye. - William Claxton

#7 Orik

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Posted 16 August 2006 - 03:49 PM

nectarine=pleach (plum+peach)

sandwiches that are large and filling and do not contain tuna or prawns


#8 Cathy

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Posted 16 August 2006 - 04:33 PM

My sisters and I murmur 'GD' to each other when someone with particularly egregious fashion sense walks by...it means 'Glamour Don't,' from a regular feature in the magazine.
You're only as good as your grease.


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#9 mongo_jones

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Posted 16 August 2006 - 04:35 PM

i'm going to cry now. i distinctly heard you say "gd" as we walked into centrico in january.

my annoying opinions: whisky, food and occasional cultural commentary

 

current restaurant review: piccolo (minneapolis)

 

current whisky review: rampur select casks (indian single malt whisky)

 

current recipe: keema chops (indian-style croquettes)

 

 

facts are meaningless. you could use facts to prove anything that's even remotely true!
~homer simpson


 


#10 bigbear

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Posted 16 August 2006 - 04:38 PM

Yagoddabefugginkiddinme is a word that I remember from my youth, that expresses disbelief.

-- Jeff

"I don't care to belong to a club that accepts people like me as members." -- Groucho Marx


#11 omnivorette

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Posted 16 August 2006 - 04:42 PM

We have a whistle. But it's not only Jewish families - we have a couple of sets of friends in Europe who have family whistles too, and they're not Jews. We also pronounce things incorrectly on purpose, imitating some words my grandfather mispronounced before his English got good. For example, misled is mizeld. Catastrophe is kat-a-strofe. Guacamole is gwa-ka-mohl.
"It seems a positively Quixotic quest to defend food from being used as any kind of social signifier, as if it could avoid the fate of each other component of our everyday lives." -Wilfrid

#12 rancho_gordo

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Posted 16 August 2006 - 04:44 PM

My oldest used to say "comfity", which must come from comfortable and cozy and some Dutch stuff, be we say "Let's get comfity" with a straight face all the time now.

Is "snoodle" a word? We used that for cuddle when I was kid.

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#13 flyfish

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Posted 16 August 2006 - 05:10 PM

My husband's family has lots of these (five kids, all fairly close in age). One we use a lot in the winter is "slurg," which describes the lump of collected slush in your wheel wells that you have to kick off in parking lots (you Southern hemisphere folks won't relate). Frozen slurgs dropped from trucks can be a real driving hazard.

They refer to the second part of one's toe as a "goink," particularly noting if someone has "hairy goinks."

Melted cheese sandwiches are "boily cheese" and ones made from cheez whiz are "cheesy muldoozers," although I'm not sure why.

In my own family, my Dutch mother came up with some astonishing expressions due to her use of English as a second language, and that fact she learned English from a bunch of Cape Bretoners. Something that was awful was "fertrocious." She referred to February as "the dread of winter." If you said "shit!" around her she would immediately, and mysteriously, say "carry seven!"

I'm sure I can think of more...

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#14 g.johnson

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Posted 16 August 2006 - 05:13 PM

My father's expression on seeing someone dressed or behaving egregiously was "The things one sees when one hasn't got one's gun on one" but I don't know that he coined it.
The Obnoxious Glyn Johnson

#15 GG Mora

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Posted 16 August 2006 - 05:23 PM

We have a whistle. But it's not only Jewish families - we have a couple of sets of friends in Europe who have family whistles too, and they're not Jews. We also pronounce things incorrectly on purpose, imitating some words my grandfather mispronounced before his English got good. For example, misled is mizeld. Catastrophe is kat-a-strofe. Guacamole is gwa-ka-mohl.

Thanks to my high school chum's Italian father, upholstery will forever be “YOU-full-sterry.”

And for the record, I always hear “MY-zuld” in my head when I see “misled.” It somehow seems more appropriate to the task, as though misleading someone were an act of miserliness. Similarly, “miniseries” should be pronounced as though it were an extension of “miseries.”