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New York City Ballet


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#271 Suzanne F

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Posted 22 December 2017 - 09:10 PM

Thanks! Think back to how awful the Met Opera orchestra was for years before Maestro Jimmy. Unbecoming of such an institution. Whatever his flaws (which are major, alas, and were known in the music world for years), he turned it into a world-class group that can perform on its own to great acclaim. Everything has to be of one level, otherwise it all suffers.

 

It would be great if he could get it to the point where, if there were still a classical music record industry, they would have gotten a contract to record ballet music.

 

 

That would indeed be a boon to companies and schools that cannot field their own orchestras.


I don't actually know what a handbasket is -- but whatever they are, singer-songwriters are in the first ones going to hell. -- Sneakeater, 29 March 2018 - 12:06 AM

 

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#272 Sneakeater

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Posted 22 December 2017 - 09:27 PM

And for record buyers (if there still were any)!  I still treasure the albums of ballet music that Albert Wolff made for Decca in the '50s.  It's not profound music -- but if you're in the mood for it, when well-conducted and played, it's so enjoyable.  And you can spin around your apartment while you're listening.


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#273 Sneakeater

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Posted 22 December 2017 - 09:27 PM

(No, I didn't listen to them when they were new.)


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#274 Sneakeater

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Posted 22 December 2017 - 09:29 PM

(I should note that, unlike the enjoyable junk of the kind Wolff conducted, Balanchine mainly choreographed to independently excellent music, making the NYCB orchestra's role even more crucial.)


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#275 voyager

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Posted 22 December 2017 - 09:45 PM

  And you can spin around your apartment while you're listening.

 

Another spinner.   Dance like nobody's watching!


It's not my circus,

not my monkeys.


#276 taion

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Posted 23 December 2017 - 07:02 PM

Oh, I agree with Nordlinger on the merits as well. I just found that part of his piece incredibly annoying – like notably more annoying than the rest of his writing, which already sets a pretty high bar for how much it annoys me.


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#277 taion

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Posted 23 December 2017 - 08:47 PM

In other words, professional music writing is usually better-informed than professional food writing.  But not Jay Nordlinger.

 

(And that OOMP shit.  Is it really so admirable to be smug about your belief that an art form is dead?  Or even worse, to be acting to kill it?)

 

Also, why the heck do you read Nordlinger? I at least have an excuse for wasting my time reading his crap.


I didn't tip at Per Se either.

#278 taion

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Posted 23 December 2017 - 08:57 PM

It's also... well, here's the rest of what he wrote on Jewels:
 

Under Litton, the Fauré was duly Fauré-like: courtly, gracious, and French. Solos in the orchestra ranged from adequate to excellent. The horn was admirably supple and unflubbing. The piano soloist in the Stravinsky was Stephen Gosling, who was accurate and alive. I have heard more jagged, more emphatic accounts. Bonier accounts. Perhaps the musicians were limited by the needs of the dancers. Whatever the case, the Capriccio had its impishness, gaiety, and other qualities. I was worried about whether Gosling would be able to take a bow, because ballet is so odd in its rituals (at least to me). But there he was onstage, to the side of the dancers. I wonder whether most in attendance knew who he was.

Let me tell you something about the Tchaikovsky symphonies and me: No. 3 is my least favorite of the six, always has been. In “Diamonds,” however, you see that the work is practically as balletic as it is symphonic. And Litton made me appreciate it more than ever.

Of course, the Bolshoi dancers had something to do with it. I should stay in my lane, as they say, and not comment on ballet: but the Bolshoi dancers gleamed and cut and sparkled like, forgive me, diamonds.

 

I think it's a little weird to review the music in isolation. And the gratuitous jab at ballet patrons is obnoxious as well.

 

I mean, I guess he acknowledges that he's not going to write about ballet, and for all I know he's right in his judgment to me, but it still feels weird to me.


I didn't tip at Per Se either.

#279 Sneakeater

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Posted 23 December 2017 - 10:48 PM

Also, why the heck do you read Nordlinger?


That shows you how unnaturally interested I am in the subject matter.

Shit, I even read Norman Lebrecht's blog.
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#280 taion

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Posted 04 January 2018 - 03:54 AM

Or perhaps it was the confident authority that he brought to casting, choreography and classes — artistic prowess that helped earn critical praise for the company.


??!
I didn't tip at Per Se either.

#281 Suzanne F

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Posted 04 January 2018 - 11:36 PM

There was body-shaming going on? I'm shocked, shocked!


I don't actually know what a handbasket is -- but whatever they are, singer-songwriters are in the first ones going to hell. -- Sneakeater, 29 March 2018 - 12:06 AM

 

notorious stickler -- NY Times
deeply annoying and nitpicking -- Molly O'Neill, One Big Table


#282 taion

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Posted 27 January 2018 - 05:16 PM

Is it normal for third ring to be closed for ticket purchases for the current season? Or is the Martins thing really hurting them?
I didn't tip at Per Se either.

#283 Sneakeater

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Posted 27 January 2018 - 05:31 PM

That's not normal AFAIK. They do it all the time for Great Performances and Mostly Mozart at Geffen Hall, but I don't remember their doing it for NYCB at Koch.
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#284 taion

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Posted 27 January 2018 - 05:42 PM

A lot of weeknight performances this season show a lot of availability in first and second ring, but nothing in third. I guess thats a bad sign.
I didn't tip at Per Se either.

#285 Sneakeater

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Posted 27 January 2018 - 10:24 PM

Maybe I'm just wrong. Whenever I see that, I assume the cheap seats sell out quickest. (At the Met, the Balcony and even the Dress Circle frequently sell out before any of the lower sections.) I can't remember ever seeing Koch's Third Ring empty (as, again, you do at the Geffen shows where they just close the Third Tier).
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