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Dessert, the Sweet Spot


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#16 omnivorette

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Posted 08 September 2006 - 08:01 PM

What did Ali serve last night - was it sauteed pears?
"It seems a positively Quixotic quest to defend food from being used as any kind of social signifier, as if it could avoid the fate of each other component of our everyday lives." -Wilfrid

#17 Daisy

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Posted 08 September 2006 - 08:02 PM

Plums, including green ones although I don't know if they were greengages.
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#18 rancho_gordo

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Posted 08 September 2006 - 08:03 PM

Mine have tasted like flat bad pancakes. Or chewy. or eggy.

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#19 Maurice Naughton

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Posted 08 September 2006 - 08:12 PM

Inspiration is on the wing.

I started salivating while reading David Karp's article on French Greengages. I don't usually eat desserts, but finishing up a meal with fresh fruit or cheese (or both) is what I like best.

On Wednesday next, I should be settled into my Paris apartment by one in the afternoon. It's on rue du Petit Musc, three blocks south of rue St-Antoine, which bisects the Marais from east (place de la Bastille) to west, where it becomes rue Rivoli. On the corner of Petit Musc and St-Antoine is one of the great greengrocers in Paris, with the highest quality seasonal fruits and vegetables to be found. (And, unfortunately, some of the highest prices.)

My first excursion, after a shower, shall be to stroll down there to discuss la Reine Claude Dorée with the patron, and if possible to buy a clutch. Dessert? Maybe with some Maroilles? Or a light entree, with some jamon bellota? Or breakfast, in a bowl with some crème fleuri or frâiche and toasted brioche? Suggest some more, and I'll let you know.
Cambridge University Professor of Electrical Engineering, Sir Charles Oatley, in October, 1948, along with his student Dennis McMullan, began the research that led to the production of the first scanning electron microscope in 1965.

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#20 Behemoth

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Posted 08 September 2006 - 08:33 PM

Mine have tasted like flat bad pancakes. Or chewy. or eggy.


It should be a lot like a crepe (therefore, a good flat pancake), with stuff embedded in it. The recipe I use is the one in James Peterson's French cookbook. You can get the recipe online at Amazon if you look up his book and search "clafoutis". There are some awful vesions out there, I tried a bunch before settling on this one.

I love greengage plums. Guinardi's in Pennsylvania used to carry them, and I've gotten them at Schnucks here in town. I always wondered if they were related to the hard, sour little green plums we used to eat in the spring in Lebanon. Those get similarly sweet as they ripen. Always tried to convince the grocer to ship the greengages in unripe, but he had no control over that end of the supply chain.
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#21 Pingarina

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Posted 08 September 2006 - 09:07 PM

Inspiration is on the wing.

I started salivating while reading David Karp's article on French Greengages. I don't usually eat desserts, but finishing up a meal with fresh fruit or cheese (or both) is what I like best.

On Wednesday next, I should be settled into my Paris apartment by one in the afternoon. It's on rue du Petit Musc, three blocks south of rue St-Antoine, which bisects the Marais from east (place de la Bastille) to west, where it becomes rue Rivoli. On the corner of Petit Musc and St-Antoine is one of the great greengrocers in Paris, with the highest quality seasonal fruits and vegetables to be found. (And, unfortunately, some of the highest prices.)

My first excursion, after a shower, shall be to stroll down there to discuss la Reine Claude Dorée with the patron, and if possible to buy a clutch. Dessert? Maybe with some Maroilles? Or a light entree, with some jamon bellota? Or breakfast, in a bowl with some crème fleuri or frâiche and toasted brioche? Suggest some more, and I'll let you know.

Maurice, I'm swooning :P . I had to look at Pages Jaunes photos de villes to see the shop you're describing. It's "Halles St. Antoine?" I know the sort of grocer you're talking about: small, unassuming, but with fruits that are worthy of the displays in the windows at Cartier.
Yes, with Maroilles! Yes with Jamon! Yes with cream!
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#22 Pingarina

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Posted 08 September 2006 - 09:10 PM


Mine have tasted like flat bad pancakes. Or chewy. or eggy.


It should be a lot like a crepe (therefore, a good flat pancake), with stuff embedded in it. The recipe I use is the one in James Peterson's French cookbook. You can get the recipe online at Amazon if you look up his book and search "clafoutis". There are some awful vesions out there, I tried a bunch before settling on this one.

I love greengage plums. Guinardi's in Pennsylvania used to carry them, and I've gotten them at Schnucks here in town. I always wondered if they were related to the hard, sour little green plums we used to eat in the spring in Lebanon. Those get similarly sweet as they ripen. Always tried to convince the grocer to ship the greengages in unripe, but he had no control over that end of the supply chain.

I agree. It might take a few tries to find a good recipe. Try tweaking the flour content (and not overmixing), or use milk instead of cream. Right out of the oven it should be puffy and golden. Once it's deflated, is is indeed a bit eggy, but like a firm custard, not tough.
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#23 Maurice Naughton

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Posted 08 September 2006 - 10:17 PM

Maurice, I'm swooning :P . I had to look at Pages Jaunes photos de villes to see the shop you're describing. It's "Halles St. Antoine?" I know the sort of grocer you're talking about: small, unassuming, but with fruits that are worthy of the displays in the windows at Cartier.
Yes, with Maroilles! Yes with Jamon! Yes with cream!


Why, aren't you clever! I keep forgetting about the wonders of les pages jaunes. Yes, Halles St. Antoine is exactly right. They also have a prime selection of heirloom tomatoes--right now! And baby purple artichokes, and Cepes, and . . .
Cambridge University Professor of Electrical Engineering, Sir Charles Oatley, in October, 1948, along with his student Dennis McMullan, began the research that led to the production of the first scanning electron microscope in 1965.

I thought you'd want to know.

#24 bloviatrix

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Posted 08 September 2006 - 10:21 PM


Maurice, I'm swooning :P . I had to look at Pages Jaunes photos de villes to see the shop you're describing. It's "Halles St. Antoine?" I know the sort of grocer you're talking about: small, unassuming, but with fruits that are worthy of the displays in the windows at Cartier.
Yes, with Maroilles! Yes with Jamon! Yes with cream!


Why, aren't you clever! I keep forgetting about the wonders of les pages jaunes. Yes, Halles St. Antoine is exactly right. They also have a prime selection of heirloom tomatoes--right now! And baby purple artichokes, and Cepes, and . . .


I love it when you talk produce. :P
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#25 Pingarina

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Posted 08 September 2006 - 10:21 PM

Why, aren't you clever! I keep forgetting about the wonders of les pages jaunes. Yes, Halles St. Antoine is exactly right. They also have a prime selection of heirloom tomatoes--right now! And baby purple artichokes, and Cepes, and . . .



please, stop.
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#26 Maurice Naughton

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Posted 08 September 2006 - 10:26 PM


I keep forgetting about the wonders of les pages jaunes. Yes, Halles St. Antoine is exactly right. They also have a prime selection of heirloom tomatoes--right now! And baby purple artichokes, and Cepes, and . . .


please, stop.

Aw, you're just like all the others! Damn.
Cambridge University Professor of Electrical Engineering, Sir Charles Oatley, in October, 1948, along with his student Dennis McMullan, began the research that led to the production of the first scanning electron microscope in 1965.

I thought you'd want to know.

#27 omnivorette

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Posted 09 September 2006 - 03:21 AM

My peach clafouti turned out very nicely! I ended up tossing the peach slices with sugar and plum schnaps, and I heated up the liquid and spooned it over the clafouti when I served it, and we had glasses of the schnaps to drink with it.
"It seems a positively Quixotic quest to defend food from being used as any kind of social signifier, as if it could avoid the fate of each other component of our everyday lives." -Wilfrid

#28 foodie52

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Posted 09 September 2006 - 04:53 PM

How about rhubarb? In English boarding school in the 60's, we would have it for dessert - stewed with custard. Didn't care for it. But I love making rhubarb crumble - it's my dessert of choice in the short winters we have down here. I don't like adding strawberries: i don't care for the consistency of cooked strawberries. But I do add some sugar, lemon juice and lemon zest. Sometimes apples.
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#29 Ling

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Posted 09 September 2006 - 10:46 PM

The last two nights I've been eating this spice cake with hot brandy caramel.

The recipe was something I made up by combining components I liked from recipes found online.

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#30 foodie52

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Posted 09 September 2006 - 11:38 PM

I snagged some white chocolate bread pudding cheesecake with creme anglaise, made by the chef in the Central Market cooking school last night - Happy Abdelbaki, from New Orleans, now relocated in Mississippi.

It's my dessert tonight while I watch the Texas-OU game!
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