Jump to content


Photo

Nobel '06 Predictions


  • Please log in to reply
76 replies to this topic

#1 TheMatt

TheMatt

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,137 posts

Posted 01 October 2006 - 06:56 PM

We seem to have predictions threads for many things, so why not this week's Nobel Prizes. As a chemist, I'll make some for the Chem prizes. As a theoretical chemist, I'll confine myself to that because, well, I only really know research in that field.

Some guesses are:
  • Rick Heller for "frozen" gaussian wavepacket dynamics
  • Martin Karplus for, I guess, his Karplus equation work in NMR, but a lot more stuff
  • A joint prize between John Tully and Nakamura Hiroki for their work on nonadiabatic theory
I can also be a homer for CU and pick Josef Michl or Casey Hynes. In reality, most are thinking either the green fluorescent protein or palladium people will win, with perennial Nobel possible George Whitesides in the fray as well.

As far as Physics, my guess is the people who did the research on the giant magnetoresistance effect (GMR), Grunberg, Felt, Sato. We all owe them a debt of gratitude for our spiffy near-TB hard drives. The erbium fiber optic people also have a shot.

Physio/Medicine and Economics I have no idea about.

Literature...I dunno. Uh...Inger Christensen, some poet I heard was a possible like two or three years ago.

And, of course, Peace. Will this be Bono's year? The Aussies at Centrebet have Martti Ahtisaari of Aceh accords fame as the favorite right now. In fact, a lot of Aceh folks are at the top. Interesting, internets people like Vint Cerf and Tim Berners-Lee are also on the list.
Dr TheMatt
Certified Nerd and Oh So Boring...

#2 hollywood

hollywood

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 27,627 posts

Posted 01 October 2006 - 07:42 PM

Are the awards politicized?

Then that happened.

 

I traveled to Tijuana to smack the federali

Who packing avocado toast like Mario Batali--Black Thought


#3 Maurice Naughton

Maurice Naughton

    In Memoriam

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,010 posts

Posted 01 October 2006 - 08:07 PM

We seem to have predictions threads for many things, so why not this week's Nobel Prizes. As a chemist, I'll make some for the Chem prizes. As a theoretical chemist, I'll confine myself to that because, well, I only really know research in that field.

Some guesses are:

  • Rick Heller for "frozen" gaussian wavepacket dynamics
  • Martin Karplus for, I guess, his Karplus equation work in NMR, but a lot more stuff
  • A joint prize between John Tully and Nakamura Hiroki for their work on nonadiabatic theory
I can also be a homer for CU and pick Josef Michl or Casey Hynes. In reality, most are thinking either the green fluorescent protein or palladium people will win, with perennial Nobel possible George Whitesides in the fray as well.

As far as Physics, my guess is the people who did the research on the giant magnetoresistance effect (GMR), Grunberg, Felt, Sato. We all owe them a debt of gratitude for our spiffy near-TB hard drives. The erbium fiber optic people also have a shot.

Physio/Medicine and Economics I have no idea about.

Literature...I dunno. Uh...Inger Christensen, some poet I heard was a possible like two or three years ago.

And, of course, Peace. Will this be Bono's year? The Aussies at Centrebet have Martti Ahtisaari of Aceh accords fame as the favorite right now. In fact, a lot of Aceh folks are at the top. Interesting, internets people like Vint Cerf and Tim Berners-Lee are also on the list.


You're making all that up. My Poopsie warned me.
Cambridge University Professor of Electrical Engineering, Sir Charles Oatley, in October, 1948, along with his student Dennis McMullan, began the research that led to the production of the first scanning electron microscope in 1965.

I thought you'd want to know.

#4 mongo_jones

mongo_jones

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 24,366 posts

Posted 01 October 2006 - 09:00 PM

Literature...I dunno. Uh...Inger Christensen, some poet I heard was a possible like two or three years ago.


i think it is finally clive cussler's time. similarly, dick cheney is due for the peace prize. he missed out for all his work in the 70s.

my annoying opinions: whisky, food and occasional cultural commentary

 

current restaurant review: house of curry (sri lankan in rosemount, mn)

 

current whisky review: glen ord 28

 

current recipe: white bean curry with green peppers

 

 

facts are meaningless. you could use facts to prove anything that's even remotely true!
~homer simpson


 


#5 hollywood

hollywood

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 27,627 posts

Posted 02 October 2006 - 12:10 AM



Literature...I dunno. Uh...Inger Christensen, some poet I heard was a possible like two or three years ago.


i think it is finally clive cussler's time. similarly, dick cheney is due for the peace prize. he missed out for all his work in the 70s.

mongo, aren't you up for your work here and on mongomania?

Then that happened.

 

I traveled to Tijuana to smack the federali

Who packing avocado toast like Mario Batali--Black Thought


#6 TheMatt

TheMatt

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,137 posts

Posted 02 October 2006 - 01:58 PM

"The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine goes to Andrew Z. Fire and Craig C. Mello 'for their discovery of RNA interference - gene silencing by double-stranded RNA'."

So...yeah.

Tomorrow we get one of the two important awards, Physics.
Dr TheMatt
Certified Nerd and Oh So Boring...

#7 TheMatt

TheMatt

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,137 posts

Posted 03 October 2006 - 01:53 PM

Welp, I was off. It's an astronomy prize:

The Nobel Prize in Physics goes to John C. Mather and George F. Smoot "for their discovery of the blackbody form and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation".
Dr TheMatt
Certified Nerd and Oh So Boring...

#8 Suzanne F

Suzanne F

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 21,903 posts

Posted 03 October 2006 - 01:58 PM

Jeez, it feels weird when people of my generation win. Go, MIT!!!

I don't actually know what a handbasket is -- but whatever they are, singer-songwriters are in the first ones going to hell. -- Sneakeater, 29 March 2018 - 12:06 AM

 

notorious stickler -- NY Times
deeply annoying and nitpicking -- Molly O'Neill, One Big Table


#9 alexhills

alexhills

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 685 posts

Posted 03 October 2006 - 11:21 PM

Welp, I was off. It's an astronomy prize:

The Nobel Prize in Physics goes to John C. Mather and George F. Smoot "for their discovery of the blackbody form and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation".


From what I understand - not much admittedly - that was always work that was going to win the prize at some point, just a question of when. The structure of the early universe, pretty important stuff... My dad will pleased, his people.
He has taken up residence in the 'Grand Hotel Abyss' - a beautiful hotel, equipped with every comfort, on the edge of an abyss, of nothingness, of absurdity. And the daily contemplation of the abyss between excellent meals or artistic entertainments, can only heighten the enjoyment of the subtle comforts offered.

Lukacs on Adorno, but....

#10 TheMatt

TheMatt

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,137 posts

Posted 04 October 2006 - 02:15 PM

The Nobel Prize in Chemistry goes to Roger D. Kornberg "for his studies of the molecular basis of eukaryotic transcription".

Once again the Nobel committee thinks structural biology = chemistry. I have to imagine they have enough money to start a freaking Nobel for biology. Maybe if they did that they could stop shoehorning it into the Chemistry prize.

Heck, by 2010 I'm sure we'll see DNA and proteins get the Medicine, Physics, and Chem prizes. Probably Peace too, somehow.
Dr TheMatt
Certified Nerd and Oh So Boring...

#11 Wilfrid1

Wilfrid1

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 42,108 posts

Posted 04 October 2006 - 02:38 PM

They should just have one prize for "ologies" - would make it simple.
Elect-a-lujah

***Every Monday***At the Sign of the Pink Pig.

If the author could go around the place hitting random readers with a rubber hammer, the Pink Pig would still be worth a visit.

#12 mongo_jones

mongo_jones

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 24,366 posts

Posted 04 October 2006 - 02:45 PM

peace is all about biology. man. groovy. yeah.

my annoying opinions: whisky, food and occasional cultural commentary

 

current restaurant review: house of curry (sri lankan in rosemount, mn)

 

current whisky review: glen ord 28

 

current recipe: white bean curry with green peppers

 

 

facts are meaningless. you could use facts to prove anything that's even remotely true!
~homer simpson


 


#13 ludja

ludja

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 493 posts

Posted 04 October 2006 - 02:53 PM

Well, I'm shivering this morning. I did my postdoctoral work with Roger Kornberg. It is completely bizarre to hear his interviews about the prize and our (the lab's) work. :D (I thought about adding him as an earlier guess to this thread...)

Re: the prize being in Chemistry, I had been wondering if he won if it would be in Medicine or Chemistry. I was leaning more towards chemistry because so much of his work has been in biochemistry (not biology)and as such, is very molecular in focus. His work has a very large impact on medicine but the discoveries are so fundamental that they are not immediately applicable to medical therapies. Although ultimately the prize is rewarding the structural determination of RNA Polymerase and the transcription complex, this work builds on three decades of detailed biochemical work. (I worked in the structural studies part of the lab.)

Roger's Ph.D. is in Chemistry and the training of a high percentage of the group working on the structural determinations, myself included, were Chemistry Ph.D's. That being said, I'm pretty certain Roger would view himself as a biochemist now, but it does point out that training in Chemistry is still important in working in interdisciplinary fields. There was a lot of technique development in Kornberg's laboratory as well. The first decade of structural determinations were accomplished by developing and using novel techniques in high resolution electron microscopy of two-dimensional protein crystals. (The 1,000,000 dalton protein complex is so large that it was not clear that it would be able to be solved with conventional approaches using X-ray crystallography.)
In a man's letters his soul lies naked --- Samuel Johnson

#14 Ron Johnson

Ron Johnson

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 8,958 posts

Posted 04 October 2006 - 02:58 PM

Literature...I dunno. Uh...Inger Christensen, some poet I heard was a possible like two or three years ago.


Phillip Roth?
Amos Oz?

#15 ludja

ludja

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 493 posts

Posted 05 October 2006 - 07:07 PM

Tomorrow on NPR's 'Talk of the Nation: Science Friday" they are having interviews with all of the 2006 Science Nobelists. I think I heard that this is only the second time that Americans have "swept" all the science awards in one year.

In the SF Bay area, the show is on from 11:00 am - 1:00 pm.

Here's a link to the site: http://www.sciencefr...ur1_100606.html

This week, the winners of the 2006 Nobel Prizes in physics, chemistry, and physiology or medicine were announced. Physicists George Smoot and John Mather won the prize in physics for their work in analyzing the cosmic microwave background radiation, work that helped to support theories about the Big Bang. Andrew Fire and Craig Mello won the prize in Medicine or Physiology for for their discovery of RNA interference - gene silencing by double-stranded RNA. And Roger Kornberg won the prize in Chemistry for his work in DNA transcription, the process by which information stored in the genes is copied, and then transferred to the parts of cells that produce proteins.


In a man's letters his soul lies naked --- Samuel Johnson