Jump to content


Photo

Scrambled Eggs


  • Please log in to reply
83 replies to this topic

#1 Peter Creasey

Peter Creasey

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,918 posts

Posted 31 July 2007 - 01:30 PM

I've cooked scrambled eggs for just myself and also for two to several hundred people...both slow and fast. I usually have cooked them slowly only when by necessity for large numbers of people.

I have seen people claim one or the other is best.

Is there some kind of consensus...slow or fast cooking?
_________________
. . . . . . . . . . . . . Pete/Houston
SOAC . . .
. . "for the discreet and refined enjoyment of uncommon wine . .
. . . . and victuals and the companionship accruing thereto" . . . .

#2 omnivorette

omnivorette

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 25,546 posts

Posted 31 July 2007 - 01:33 PM

Well....how do you like your eggs? When I have the patience, I like to do them slooooow...they get so creamy.
"It seems a positively Quixotic quest to defend food from being used as any kind of social signifier, as if it could avoid the fate of each other component of our everyday lives." -Wilfrid

#3 Wilfrid1

Wilfrid1

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 42,108 posts

Posted 31 July 2007 - 01:57 PM

I have made them in a bain marie, stirring slowly for a long time. It's better; but to be honest, I hardly ever bother.
Elect-a-lujah

***Every Monday***At the Sign of the Pink Pig.

If the author could go around the place hitting random readers with a rubber hammer, the Pink Pig would still be worth a visit.

#4 SFJoe

SFJoe

    In Memoriam

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,716 posts

Posted 31 July 2007 - 02:12 PM

Slow is the way to go. Fast is just a broken omelet.

although in fairness, the first bit of slow isn't as important--you can do higher heat with constant stirring until you get close, then slow waaay down. I haven't taken the trouble to find the temp where you need to slow down, but it's probably 50*C or so. Heavy pan key.

Be sure to caramelize your morels thoroughly before you add the eggs, too.

#5 GG Mora

GG Mora

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 9,241 posts

Posted 31 July 2007 - 02:21 PM

Fast on weekdays; slow when I have the time on weekends. Julia has you add butter (a lot of it) after the eggs have started to coagulate, then carefully mix to create something approaching an emulsion. Fabulous.

SFJoe, permission to use chanterelles instead?

#6 Daniel

Daniel

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 13,791 posts

Posted 31 July 2007 - 02:24 PM

Yeh, my favorite way to cook eggs is over a double boiler with cream.. I like to add tarragon..
Ason, I keep planets in orbit.

#7 Behemoth

Behemoth

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 7,835 posts

Posted 31 July 2007 - 02:33 PM

Fast on weekdays; slow when I have the time on weekends. Julia has you add butter (a lot of it) after the eggs have started to coagulate, then carefully mix to create something approaching an emulsion. Fabulous.

SFJoe, permission to use chanterelles instead?


GG I didn't get a chance to respond to your chanterelle thread, and now I can't find it. Chanterelles are in the market with a vengeance over here this time of year so I use them a lot. one thing I like to do is rip chanterelles lengthwise, and use them with shredded chicken in various stuff. The shredded mushrooms and chicken have a similar look and texture so it plays on that a little. By various stuff I mean in an asian-style salad, or simmered in stock with a little cream and green peas, then topped with pastry as a pot pie or in a crepe, or in thai soup with coconut and galangal.

As for scrambled eggs, I like both ways, so long as they aren't dry.
Summarizing, then, we assume that relational information is not subject to a corpus of utterance tokens upon which conformity has been defined by the paired utterance test.
-Chomskybot

#8 Wilfrid1

Wilfrid1

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 42,108 posts

Posted 31 July 2007 - 02:49 PM

Can I just say Pfifferlingen? Thank you.
Elect-a-lujah

***Every Monday***At the Sign of the Pink Pig.

If the author could go around the place hitting random readers with a rubber hammer, the Pink Pig would still be worth a visit.

#9 joiei

joiei

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,516 posts

Posted 31 July 2007 - 02:55 PM

I prefer the slow way, that way they stay creamy. And I do add the butter as Julia said to. Also, I only salt with seasalt and about 5 grinds on the peppermill. The chantrelles sound excellent.

This past weekend, I was at the French Hen here in t-town and they had scrambled eggs with caviar and truffle oil on the menu ($18) and the first plate they brought out had to be sent back. The cooks just do not understand soft scrambled plus the dish overall is overpriced for what it was. I will go back but I will not order that dish again.
"Love ya once, love ya twice, love ya more than beans and rice"

#10 Daisy

Daisy

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 15,670 posts

Posted 31 July 2007 - 03:10 PM

Slow for scrambling, fast for omelets. I like to add a little cream near the end of scrambling if there happens to be any on hand.

I beat the eggs with very litle salt, preferring to salt and pepper after they are cooked.
Sardines aren't for sissies.---Frank Bruni
------------------------------------------------------------
The mistake one makes is to react to what people post rather than to what they mean.---Dr. Johnson
-------------------------------------------------------------
I want to be the girl with the most cake.

#11 Wilfrid1

Wilfrid1

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 42,108 posts

Posted 31 July 2007 - 03:13 PM

Also, you can bung them in the microwave. They come out kind of rubbery, but it's very fast.
Elect-a-lujah

***Every Monday***At the Sign of the Pink Pig.

If the author could go around the place hitting random readers with a rubber hammer, the Pink Pig would still be worth a visit.

#12 Daniel

Daniel

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 13,791 posts

Posted 31 July 2007 - 03:16 PM

You can also add the egg powder to hot water and mix..

Or Go Rocky Style and crack them into a glass and chug..
Ason, I keep planets in orbit.

#13 Melonious Thunk

Melonious Thunk

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 5,685 posts

Posted 31 July 2007 - 03:22 PM

Can I just say Pfifferlingen? Thank you.


I said it first, years ago! <_<
Can one get them here?
"Pippa, I'm going to tell you something and it's important. Sometimes you have to go to work."__Hannah Marie Konstadt, Two years, nine months.

'How high can you stoop?"__Oscar Levant.

#14 Wilfrid1

Wilfrid1

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 42,108 posts

Posted 31 July 2007 - 03:35 PM

Or Go Rocky Style and crack them into a glass and chug..

And jump up and down until they're scrambled.
Elect-a-lujah

***Every Monday***At the Sign of the Pink Pig.

If the author could go around the place hitting random readers with a rubber hammer, the Pink Pig would still be worth a visit.

#15 Jaymes

Jaymes

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,449 posts

Posted 31 July 2007 - 03:39 PM

Julia has you add butter (a lot of it) after the eggs have started to coagulate, then carefully mix to create something approaching an emulsion. Fabulous.


Yes, and long ago I read (I think in Larousse Gastromonique) that the way to produce creamy scrambled eggs was to have your butter and heavy cream at the ready as you begin scrambling your eggs (to which you've thus far added nothing). You add the butter, as GG says, after the eggs have started to coagulate. But you do not add cream (or water or any other liquid) until the penultimate moment, when the eggs are just about ready to come out. It stops the cooking, the cream mixes with the little uncooked bits and it all melds into a creamy mound of deliciousness.

I've found this works particularly well with people that don't like seeing raw flemmy bits in their eggs, but nobody likes their eggs hard and overcooked, so this fixes that problem.

Creamy and soft, but thoroughly cooked with no raw bits.

The Voice of America