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#1 guajolote

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Posted 20 September 2004 - 07:54 PM

my favorite nero wolfe recipe is the 20 minute scrambled eggs. " a women could never make these because she isn;t patient enough'

:D

#2 NeroW

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Posted 20 September 2004 - 08:04 PM

Stout was perhaps correct, as I have never been successful with these eggs.

It's actually 40-minutes, in The Mother Hunt.

I did them over a double-boiler, as recommended (but what in the hell is an asbestos pad?), and I still got up to only about 10 minutes or so.

You are supposed to let them cook undisturbed for 15 minutes. Who does that?
We eat so many shrimp, we got iodine poisonin

#3 Orik

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Posted 20 September 2004 - 08:10 PM

but what in the hell is an asbestos pad?

I haven't seen these in the US, round pads, with a wire mesh on both sides and an insulated handle. They help distribute low heat equally under a pan.

sandwiches that are large and filling and do not contain tuna or prawns


#4 guajolote

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Posted 20 September 2004 - 08:13 PM

Stout was perhaps correct, as I have never been successful with these eggs.

It's actually 40-minutes, in The Mother Hunt.

I did them over a double-boiler, as recommended (but what in the hell is an asbestos pad?), and I still got up to only about 10 minutes or so.

You are supposed to let them cook undisturbed for 15 minutes. Who does that?

you're a woman, you weren't patient enough :D

#5 Wilfrid1

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Posted 20 September 2004 - 08:38 PM

Reminds me - I meant to post last week that there were three copies of the great Nero Wolfe cook book at the Mysterious Bookshop. It's on 56th, near the 7th avenue end, north side. Go upstairs - carefully - to the second hand section and ask if you can't see them. One is a first edition hardback - not crazily priced - the others less expensive. Strongly recommended.

Anyone interested might want to call ahead or e-mail, here's the web-site.
Elect-a-lujah

***Every Monday***At the Sign of the Pink Pig.

If the author could go around the place hitting random readers with a rubber hammer, the Pink Pig would still be worth a visit.

#6 Cathy

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Posted 20 September 2004 - 09:52 PM

Or you can order the paperback edition from Amazon...
You're only as good as your grease.


When working with high heat, the first contact between the cooking surface and the food must be respected.

-- Francis Mallman







#7 Vanessa

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Posted 20 September 2004 - 09:57 PM

Or you can order the paperback edition from Amazon...

Spoilsport :D

v
...it actually comes down to what thrills you - Hugh Johnson

authenticity is a fog that recedes just when you think you may be getting near it - R Schonfeld

The most political act we do on a daily basis is to eat - Prof J Pretty

this city without boundaries we all share - zigzackly


#8 Cathy

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Posted 20 September 2004 - 10:48 PM

The greatest good for the greatest number, or something like that. :D
You're only as good as your grease.


When working with high heat, the first contact between the cooking surface and the food must be respected.

-- Francis Mallman







#9 ranitidine

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Posted 21 September 2004 - 01:37 AM

Okay, food fans. Nero Wolfe lived in NYC from the forties into the sixties. We all talk about how much better food selections, bread, etc. have gotten since then. I've always wondered where Wolfe bought his ingredients. Any opinions? Any of you done any historical research on sources in those days? Of course, one thing we know is that there were many more local farms. But pesticides came into mass use after World War II.
"Say not the struggle nought availeth...."
Arthur Hugh Clough, 1819-1861

Arise ye prisoners of starvation
Arise ye wretched of the earth

#10 Cathy

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Posted 21 September 2004 - 12:28 PM

The brownstone was on West 35th St., not far from 9th Avenue. Some of the food shops - Esposito's pork store, the fish market - were there in the '40s, I believe.
You're only as good as your grease.


When working with high heat, the first contact between the cooking surface and the food must be respected.

-- Francis Mallman







#11 NeroW

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Posted 21 September 2004 - 08:30 PM

Okay, food fans.  Nero Wolfe lived in NYC from the forties into the sixties.  We all talk about how much better food selections, bread, etc. have gotten since then.  I've always wondered where Wolfe bought his ingredients.  Any opinions?  Any of you done any historical research on sources in those days?  Of course, one thing we know is that there were many more local farms.  But pesticides came into mass use after World War II.

Wolfe and Fritz Brenner did buy a lot of their ingredients from local farmers. His corn came from "Duncan McLeod up in Putnam County," and was delivered to him every Tuesday in season.

In Murder is Corny, the delivery boy from the farm is murdered as he delivers corn to a restaurant. Wolfe is so annoyed by the supply interruption that not only does he take the case, but he involves the chief inspector of police in an arch discussion on the proper way to cook corn on the cob.

When the Inspector tells Wolfe that his wife cooks her corn on the cob in boiling water (rather than roasted in the husk and shucked at the table as Wolfe believes is the best method), Wolfe becomes irate and states: "American women should themselves be boiled in water."

As far as bread goes, it was always homemade by Fritz, and Wolfe would eat no other bread.

In A Window for Death, it is revealed that the brownstone's ice cream is purchased from Schramms on Madison Avenue.

When Fritz doesn't have time to make his own sausage, he asks "Mr. Howie in New Jersey" or a "Swiss named Darst who lives up near Chappaqua" on a pig farm.

Wolfe's starlings come from a "farmer up near Brewster," who shoots 20 of them every May and delivers them to the brownstone within a few hours. Fritz then spatchcocks them, wraps them in sage, and grills them to be served over polenta.

The peafowl comes from "that place up on Long Island," but the quality is not up to Wolfe's standards.

Kid, veal, and lamb come from a butcher in Garfield, Mr. Salzenbach.

Fish come from the Fulton Fish Market.

One of my favorite quotes is this (from The Final Deduction):

"At the dinner table, in between bits of deviled grilled lamb kidneys with a sauce he and Fritz had invented, he explained why it was that all you needed to know about any human society was what they ate. If you knew what they ate you could deduce everything else--culture, philosophy, morals, politics, everything. I enjoyed it because the kidneys were tender and tasty and the sauce is one of Fritz's best, but I wondered how you would make out if you tried to deduce everything about Wolfe by knowing what he had eaten in the past ten years. I decided you would deduce that he was dead."
We eat so many shrimp, we got iodine poisonin

#12 Wilfrid1

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Posted 21 September 2004 - 08:44 PM

We can assume Wolfe spent a lot of time conducting horizontal tastings before choosing a supplier. The very first novel in the series opens with Wolfe tasting a vast selection of bottled beers, his regular supply having been terminated. Also, since his closest friend (or, as some have speculated, his secret brother) Marko Vukcic was the properietor of an upscale restaurant, Wolfe might have had access to some of his suppliers.

One thing which always puzzled me about Wolfe was his apparent lack of interest in wine. Medicinal brandy is always available in a crisis, but what he drank with dinner is left vague. Perhaps his regime of eight or nine beers before and after dinner made it hard to fit in a bottle claret. Archie, we can assume, drank milk.

As we all know, the only alternative to dining at home which Wolfe would contemplate was Marko's restaurant. One can't help but wonder, however, whether he was tempted to visit The Four Seasons in its early days, or whether he would have approved of Gramercy Tavern. Although his preference in food leans toward the rich and elaborate, he was a great booster for American produce and traditional American dishes (although usually presented in a luxurious version). One would think he might have read James Beard with approval.
Elect-a-lujah

***Every Monday***At the Sign of the Pink Pig.

If the author could go around the place hitting random readers with a rubber hammer, the Pink Pig would still be worth a visit.

#13 Priscilla

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Posted 21 September 2004 - 09:43 PM

Even away from home and suppliers delivering heart's desire to the door, Nero did more than OK. Like in a cabin in The Black Mountain where he prepared pasta with anchovy and tomato and garlic and olive oil from the cupboard, basil and parsley from the garden, and Romano cheese "from a hole in the ground" Remembering a local custom, almost certainly from boyhood, he knew where the cheese was likely kept. I loved that.

#14 guajolote

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Posted 22 September 2004 - 12:51 PM

which book was it where nero and fritz were trying to make the perfect corned beef hash? one of the clients (a woman entered the kitchen :D ) told him the secret was adding chitterlings.

#15 NeroW

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Posted 22 September 2004 - 08:14 PM

which book was it where nero and fritz were trying to make the perfect corned beef hash? one of the clients (a woman entered the kitchen :D ) told him the secret was adding chitterlings.

Corned beef hash experimentation was in Cordially Invited to Meet Death, one of the short stories (I think from Five of a Kind? but I am not sure).

The female client, Maryella, tells Fritz that his hash is 1). too finely ground, 2). too heavy on the potatoes in proportion to the meat, and 3). missing chitlins.

Wolfe then orders his chitlins (2 lbs.) from Kretzmeyer.
We eat so many shrimp, we got iodine poisonin