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So many Exhibitions, So Little Time


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#16 backstory

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Posted 13 March 2009 - 09:10 PM

QUOTE(Rail Paul @ Mar 13 2009, 01:10 PM) View Post
MFA in Boston, opening this weekend:


Titian, Tintoretto, Veronese: Rivals in Renaissance Venice


QUOTE
The show is about three such personalities: Tiziano Vecellio, or Titian; Jacopo Robusti, known as Tintoretto; and Paolo Caliari, called Veronese. All three shot off sparks as they reforged painting as a medium. And all three had feverishly competitive overlapping careers.

These masters of 16th-century Venetian painting were no Holy Trinity. They were a discordant ménage-a-trois bound together by envy, talent, circumstances and some strange version of love.

This is the story the exhibition tells through 56 grand to celestial paintings — no filler here, not an ounce of fat — sorted into broad categories (religious images, portraits, belle donne) and arranged in compare-and-contrast couplings and triplings to indicate who was looking at whom, and why, and when.


NY Times


here too

definitely planning to go.

In the end, it's all a rental. - hollywood

#17 bloviatrix

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Posted 13 March 2009 - 09:31 PM

Opening sunday at the Jewish Museum Reclaimed: Paintings from the Collection of Jacques Goudstikker through August 2.

QUOTE
This exhibition presents rarely-seen Old Master paintings drawn from the collection of Jacques Goudstikker, a preeminent art dealer in Amsterdam prior to World War II. In 1940, Goudstikker was forced to flee war-torn Europe with his family, yet died in a tragic accident while escaping the Nazi invasion. He left behind approximately 1,400 works of art in his gallery, which were looted by Reichsmarschall Hermann Göring. After years of unsuccessful attempts to recover these paintings, his family recently reclaimed 200 paintings from the Dutch government. Nearly fifty of the finest pieces—including Dutch Old Master works and Italian and Northern Renaissance paintings—have been selected for a touring exhibition that will showcase the eye of Jacques Goudstikker and emphasize the importance of both the artworks and their historic restitution. Photographs and documents, including Goudstikker’s gallery inventory notebook, will illuminate Goudstikker’s fascinating story.


I attended a conference last year about the reclamation of looted art after war and one of the panels was devoted to the Goudstikker collection. It's an amazing story and the collection is reputed to be spectacular.
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#18 helena

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Posted 10 May 2010 - 02:10 AM

Red Grooms @Bryn Mawr's college: just 30-something works but it's a real treat... "If there’s anyone more American than Red Grooms, you’ll have to show me. Mark Twain, maybe..."


"farangs are full of surprises. It's the erudition that impresses her, not the quality of the evidence." Bangkok 8

#19 Chambolle

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Posted 10 May 2010 - 04:20 AM

This talented woman, and friend, finally gets some well-deserved recognition after five long years of work on this photographic project.

She comes from a talented, creative family of scientists, artists and intellectuals. Her sister was a Bruni dining partner. She, her sister and her parents are very talented chefs, arguably in ascending order, per she. I have enjoyed many a meal that her parents have whipped up, often chez Chambo. Her mom could have starred in Julie and Julia a generation ago.

Why not check out her stuff if you are in that SF neighborhood and tell us what you think.

Let me tell you something that you already know - it's brutally difficult to be a striving artist in New York City.

#20 AaronS

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Posted 13 May 2010 - 03:12 AM

I just got tickets to see Cre-Master 4 & 5 and hear Barney talk with the curator of the New Museum.

#21 Carolyn Tillie

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Posted 13 May 2010 - 03:15 AM

QUOTE(AaronS @ May 12 2010, 08:12 PM) View Post
I just got tickets to see Cre-Master 4 & 5 and hear Barney talk with the curator of the New Museum.


THIS Barney?


#22 AaronS

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Posted 13 May 2010 - 03:38 AM

I'll pay extra if he shows up in that suit.

#23 Lippy

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Posted 13 May 2010 - 02:14 PM

The late Monet paintings at the Gagosian are worth a visit, the only problem being that they make you lose your enthusiasm for anything else you might look at the same day.

#24 bloviatrix

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Posted 14 May 2010 - 01:30 AM

QUOTE(AaronS @ May 12 2010, 11:12 PM) View Post
I just got tickets to see Cre-Master 4 & 5 and hear Barney talk with the curator of the New Museum.

In '03, a friend's husband took their then 2 1/2 year old to the Guggenheim to see the Cre-master cycle. It was one of those times that I was actually to know she was culturally illiterate.
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#25 Lippy

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Posted 16 May 2010 - 05:43 PM

The current fashion exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum incorporates pieces from the Brooklyn Museum's collections that have been given (sort of) to the Met. The exhibit is titled, "American Woman:Forging a National Identity" but it is just as much a compact historical review of French high fashion and its influence from 1890 - 1930. That being said, it's a great exhibit that utilizes evocative painted backdrops, film clips and artifacts like lamps and furniture from the Museum's collection to put the clothes in context. An exhibit that genuinely illustrated the title of the show would, of course, focus on "sportswear" by American designers and would reach back even further, to the invention of Levi's. No such clothing after the Gibson Girl pieces are present and it's easy to see that such an exhibit would not be nearly as interesting in terms of pure jaw-dropping fashion.

#26 helena

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Posted 17 May 2010 - 02:35 AM

Steve Tobin's Steelroots at the Morton Arboretum - a great reward for a business trip to the otherwise boring destination...

turbulence


orangutan in love

"farangs are full of surprises. It's the erudition that impresses her, not the quality of the evidence." Bangkok 8

#27 bloviatrix

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Posted 23 May 2010 - 04:32 AM

We walked over the Jewish Museum today, which is open for free on Saturdays, for the Curious George Saves the Day: The Art of H.A and Margret Rey show. Was quite fascinating. The show featured many letters written between H.A. Rey and his various publishers, as well as drawings, sketches, and prints.
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#28 Sneakeater

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Posted 23 May 2010 - 08:12 PM

I loved the Scull exhibition at Acquavella. But I think it's about to close.
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#29 Carolyn Tillie

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Posted 23 May 2010 - 10:45 PM

Just got home from the San Francisco Fine Art Fair. It isn't Art Basel (well, what it?) and there was hardly anything ground-breaking or, for that matter, very controversial, but it was still nice to be able to go to one place in the city and see LOTS of galleries' holdings. Practically no installation work and I could count the video work on one had (Art Basel had a ton of that stuff). Very little foreign either, which surprised me, except from the larger galleries. I'll pull some pictures from the camera later and show some of the more interesting bits.

#30 Wilfrid

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Posted 23 May 2010 - 11:28 PM

QUOTE(bloviatrix @ May 23 2010, 04:32 AM) View Post
We walked over the Jewish Museum today, which is open for free on Saturdays, for the Curious George Saves the Day: The Art of H.A and Margret Rey show. Was quite fascinating. The show featured many letters written between H.A. Rey and his various publishers, as well as drawings, sketches, and prints.


I was there today with the Munchkin. I knew zero about Curious George or his creators, so that was fascinating.

Also quite new to me were the two major religious pieces by Gottlieb and Motherwell.