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So many Exhibitions, So Little Time


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#436 Wilfrid

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Posted 08 March 2019 - 11:08 PM

That would certainly be a good way to explore. I’ve see the later works in dedicated shows. Gagosian Chelsea for example?

Or actually why trust my memory? https://www.pinkpign...avid-smith.html

#437 Wilfrid

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Posted 08 March 2019 - 11:14 PM

By chance, the comments on the David Smith show in that article touch on the idea of late works, and how early death deprives us of them.

#438 Josh Karpf

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Posted 29 March 2019 - 03:45 AM

Verena Sieber-Fuchs, "Garlic Collar," 2012, Museum of Arts and Design, gift of the artist, 2016

 

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#439 joiei

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Posted 08 April 2019 - 07:16 PM

I'm looking forward to this opening.  https://faroutmagazi...JREMrDftHG0wjsA  


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#440 joethefoodie

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Posted 17 April 2019 - 12:03 PM

The shows and museums we visited and revisited in London and Paris were just great.

 

Certainly, having never been to a museum in London, Tate Britain and the National Gallery were both fabulous. The "blockbuster" Van Gogh at Tate, the Vermeers and William Blake, along with this show at the National Gallery: Boilly: Scenes of Parisian Life (an artist I knew nothing about), were quite moving.

 

We did want to immerse ourselves in impressionist and post-impressionist work, so a return visit to the Musée d'Orsay, along with a great day visiting La Fondation Louis Vuitton and the surrounding grounds and gardens. At Louis Vuitton, the show we saw was fantastic - The Courtauld Collection.   Anyone gonna be in Paris over the next few months - it's a must-see if you're a fan of impressionism. 

 

The exhibition presents the collection of the British entrepreneur and art patron Samuel Courtauld, which hasn't been showed in Paris for the past 60 years. 

 “The Courtauld Collection: A Vision for Impressionism” brings together some 110 works, including 60 paintings and graphic pieces, which are mainly conserved in the Courtauld Gallery or in different international public and private collections. It features some of the greatest paintings from the end of the 19th century and from the very beginning of the 20th century

 

These works include "Un Bar aux Folies Bergère" (1882) by Manet, "La Jeune Femme se poudrant" by Seurat (1889-90), "Les Joueurs" de cartesby Cézanne (1892-96), "Autoportrait à l’oreille bandée" by Van Gogh(1889), "Nevermore" by Gauguin (1897), as well as a set of ten watercolours by  J.M.W. Turner which belonged to Samuel Courtauld’s brother, Sir Stephen Courtauld. 

 

 

Samuel Courtauld, and the Courtauld family, made their fortune first in silver, then silk and rayon.  Fortunately, they were also great patrons of the arts, supporters of artists, philanthropists, etc. Samuel also had a pretty damn good eye for art. 



#441 Sneakeater

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Posted 17 April 2019 - 08:10 PM

The Courtauld Gallery in London is a pretty fabulous visit, next time you're around.  (They really pack those paintings in there!)


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#442 Wilfrid

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Posted 17 April 2019 - 11:12 PM

Yes.

I remember a rustic French restaurant in a wing of the building. But I can’t remember what it was called. Somerset House (the building).

#443 joethefoodie

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Posted 18 April 2019 - 11:37 AM

The Courtauld Gallery in London is a pretty fabulous visit, next time you're around.  (They really pack those paintings in there!)

Yeah, I imagine it will be (except now, when most of the stuff is in Paris).  

 

The show at the Vuitton Foundation also had great pictures of their actual house/gallery, back when it was their house/gallery - must have been nice to have a few dozen great impressionist paintings hanging in one's living room.

 

And while it's awe-inspiring to see so much great impressionist painting, walking up to the 2 Vermeer's gave me literal goosebumps. To say nothing of the collection of Rembrandt's the National Gallery holds.

 

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#444 joethefoodie

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Posted 26 May 2019 - 09:56 PM

Whitney Biennial  - will need a visit or two more, but some intriguing stuff. Along with some crap.



#445 bloviatrix

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Posted 28 May 2019 - 01:15 AM

Went to see Camp, the costume institute show at the Met. Meh. 


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#446 Wilfrid

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Posted 28 May 2019 - 04:29 PM

"250 objects dating from the seventeenth century to the present" (Camp).

 

Sounds like a recipe for anachronism.

 

Apparently they currently have a show of guitars too.



#447 joethefoodie

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Posted 01 June 2019 - 02:20 PM

More than guitars, Play It Loud was enjoyable enough. As was the In Praise of Painting: Dutch Masterpieces show (not the cigars), running concurrently.

 

I'm sure you'd like to see this...

 

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Or maybe this...

 

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(That Jan Steen (far left) was quite a character!)



#448 Wilfrid

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Posted 02 June 2019 - 12:29 AM

Yeah, on the one hand I’ll love the guitars show. I enjoyed seeing the guitars in the touring Stones exhibition.

But the stuffy side of me wonders how much it’s part of the Met’s mission (I know, there’s nothing new about this).

#449 Wilfrid

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Posted 02 June 2019 - 12:29 AM

Yeah, on the one hand I’ll love the guitars show. I enjoyed seeing the guitars in the touring Stones exhibition.

But the stuffy side of me wonders how much it’s part of the Met’s mission (I know, there’s nothing new about this).


ETA: oh right, f*** The Beatles.

#450 joethefoodie

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Posted 02 June 2019 - 07:38 PM

But the stuffy side of me wonders how much it’s part of the Met’s mission (I know, there’s nothing new about this).

My guess is the "mission," or at least one of their guiding principles, is to try to make enough money, in order to stay open as much as they do. 

 

One way is with a special exhibit like this, which might appeal to the masses more so than Dutch masterpieces, which was, guess what, uncrowded. Go figure.