Jump to content


Photo

eating in Japan


  • Please log in to reply
818 replies to this topic

#16 nuxvomica

nuxvomica

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 5,706 posts

Posted 22 April 2011 - 11:04 PM

Ishikawa was a maybe, saw some not-very-enthusiastic reviews, didn't have Kojyu or Edition at all, both look good. We're thinking of a long weekend in Kyoto so we'll probably budget some Kaiseki there as well. Have you been to Creations de Narasawa?

if you're going to Kyoto, maybe this piece on Kyoto will be useful , including food here- by a friend who lived there (and also used to work FOH at 15 East & Ducasse)

no idea how useful/useless Michelin Kyoto/Osaka/Kobe is, they gave a lot of stars out when the launched in 2010 (iirc)

also, another friend wrote Food Sake Tokyo, but i see you've already found her blog

both married to chefs, although chefs don't eat out so much :lol:
“Eat me,’’ it says. “Eat me and die.’’ -- Jonathan Gold

Everything is always OK in the end. If it's not OK, then it's not the end.

#17 prasantrin

prasantrin

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 7,322 posts

Posted 23 April 2011 - 12:04 AM

@nux--Yukari Sakamoto is your friend? Cool. She's always been very helpful and knowledgeable. Seems like she'd be fun to eat with!

I've not been to Creations de Narisawa. I was curious about it, but some very reliable Chow members nixed it. It's mostly furreners in Japan for short visits who rave about it, I was told.

For Tokyo, are you considering Tokyo-posts of French restaurants? I had an excellent meal at Michel Troisgrois, but I know you go to France relatively frequently, so it might not be something in which you're interested.

Is Tapas Molecular Bar on your list? It was kind of fun, but I didn't think the food was memorable at all.

In Kyoto, Ten-you is still my favourite tempura place (in the article to which nux linked, it's transliterated as Ten'yu, but on restaurant's business cards and other literature, it's Ten-you). It's just so typically Kyoto, and I much preferred it to Tempura Kondo in Tokyo. It's owned by the Tawaraya folks (of the famous ryokan).

I'd love for you to visit O-men, too. I've always wondered if the NYC branch was much different from the Kyoto branches (I've only been to the one off Shijo--not the one in Gion, but the one closer to Teramachi or thereabouts). Famous for their udon, but I like their other stuff better (I'm not a big fan of udon, though).

Also, Okariba in Kyoto. I never got to go there, but I recommended it to Peter Green (eG) and he enjoyed it. Basashi, wild boar, crickets, bees. . . what more could you want? You can find his post about it here http://egullet.org/p1555036 and the bento.com listing is here http://www.bento.com...ai/search4k.php . Certainly not a posh place, though.

#18 Orik

Orik

    Advanced Member

  • Technocrat
  • PipPipPip
  • 21,698 posts

Posted 23 April 2011 - 12:30 AM

Troisgrois is on the maybe list (haven't been to the French one in five years now). Given how good the French food was last time (Austral, L'Osier, that basque pork place) I have to imagine they can be excellent. Not sure about Gagnaire - it's his second time around in Tokyo but I always get the impression if he's not physically present his places just don't work. I hear what you're saying about Narisawa.

Luxeat was going all gaga about Kanamean Nishitomiya and their kaiseki.

Thanks for all the info! (yes, tapas molecular bar was on the list)

Looks like we'll even have a somewhat usable kitchen.

eta: okariba bento link is actually http://www.bento.com...i/rev/7143.html
sandwiches that are large and filling and do not contain tuna or prawns

#19 prasantrin

prasantrin

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 7,322 posts

Posted 23 April 2011 - 01:08 AM

Are you interested in an exclusive beef place in Kobe that only accepts reservations from people with introductions? I read about it years ago in Kateigaho International (beautifully produced magazine if you haven't seen it), and the article mentioned that readers could make reservations there if they mentioned Kateigaho. I have all the issues up to Spring/Summer 2010, so if you're interested, I could find the magazine and look up the information (everything is still in storage, but it's all fairly organised so I think I could find it relatively easily).

Is Kahala in Osaka on your list? It was always on mine, but I never got around to going there.

#20 prasantrin

prasantrin

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 7,322 posts

Posted 23 April 2011 - 11:44 AM

Another idea!

You could go to Eataly in Daikanyama and do a comparison with Eataly in NYC. Might be interesting, although perhaps not so interesting for you since a friend said the food was not so good plus there was a cover charge for dining there. Still. . .

#21 Orik

Orik

    Advanced Member

  • Technocrat
  • PipPipPip
  • 21,698 posts

Posted 23 April 2011 - 10:42 PM

Another idea!

You could go to Eataly in Daikanyama and do a comparison with Eataly in NYC. Might be interesting, although perhaps not so interesting for you since a friend said the food was not so good plus there was a cover charge for dining there. Still. . .


Maybe, although frankly I haven't eaten or bought anything in Eataly nyc yet, too many tourists. Maybe I'll need to eat in Tokyo first Posted Image

Any idea why Michelin took Edition Koji S.'s stars away?


Other places in the yes and maybe lists:


sushiko honten
mizutani
harukata
kizushi
sushi saito
araki
sawada
sushi kanesaka
sushi kazui
isshin (mostly as it's very close to the apartment there)


Ryugin
waketokuyama
nihonbashi yukari
ginza toyoda
tsukiji tamura
kanda
koju
yukimura
hishinuma
kondo
aoyama esaki
kikunoi

troisgros
aronia
edition koji
quintessence
Aka Oni (red devil) Izakaya - Sangenjaya Tokyo

lauburu

marcassin

le bourguignon

a ta guele

sandwiches that are large and filling and do not contain tuna or prawns

#22 AaronS

AaronS

    Advanced Member

  • Admin
  • PipPipPip
  • 5,646 posts

Posted 27 April 2011 - 08:02 PM

gastromondaile has a bunch of reviews, and if you look in the archives there's a piece where David Kinch recommends places in tokyo. never been to tokyo, but friends that I trust who have eaten pretty well thought tapas bar was worth going to.

#23 Orik

Orik

    Advanced Member

  • Technocrat
  • PipPipPip
  • 21,698 posts

Posted 27 April 2011 - 10:40 PM

gastromondaile has a bunch of reviews, and if you look in the archives there's a piece where David Kinch recommends places in tokyo. never been to tokyo, but friends that I trust who have eaten pretty well thought tapas bar was worth going to.



Yes, I saw dekay's reports, it's sort of amusing how last time we went there was simply no information available (except Zagat, which only published one edition) and now it's a contest between bloggers for who breaks into the most restaurants where they're not at all welcome. I've got about 120 places on the list, which I'm afraid means four meals a day if we just stay in Tokyo, five if we take some side trips... and reservations are difficult. Yesterday I had the funniest one ever - the person on the other side was extremely friendly and helpful, but spoke limited English and there was just no way he'd get the spelling of my name from English letter names or military alphabet... spur of the moment improvisation led me to say K like Kohada, U like Uni, S like... at this point we were both pretty much bursting with laughter.

I couldn't think of any Japanese fish names starting with an R.


sandwiches that are large and filling and do not contain tuna or prawns

#24 prasantrin

prasantrin

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 7,322 posts

Posted 27 April 2011 - 10:51 PM

re: Edition Koji Shimomura. . . do you read Japanese? Someone on Chow pointed out a blog that said

裏をとったワケではありませんが、私が小耳に挟んだところによれば、エディション・コウジ・シモムラに打診があったようです。
ただし、そのままでは昇格できない、内装などのテコ入れが必要と言って来たのです。
巨額の投資と引き換えに星を得る・・・天秤にかけた結果、『No』という判断を下したとか。
ミシュランがそんな指南までやっているとは驚きでした。
特定の店だけにこんな話しを持ちかける、これってヤラセじゃないか?
これまたフェアでない話しです。


I can't understand some of the kanji (ok, a lot of the kanji), but I think in order to go up in stars, the restaurant would have had to make a lot of changes (costing a lot of money), so it was either stay at the number of stars they were, or possibly drop a star. So they declined to be in the guide.

But it's all speculation, I think (remember, my translation is likely way off, too)

eta--re: david kinch. When I went to Aronia, Akiko (Chef Takazawa's wife) mentioned that they are "good friends". I don't know how well David speaks Japanese, but I know Takazawa-san doesn't speak much English, so I don't really know how close they really are (Akiko speaks English smashingly well, however, and she usually takes very good care of the furreners who dine there). But I think I heard David Kinch thinks highly of Takazawa-san. (Maybe you can ask Pim for more info?)

#25 Orik

Orik

    Advanced Member

  • Technocrat
  • PipPipPip
  • 21,698 posts

Posted 28 April 2011 - 12:00 AM

I've been negotiating game birds with Akiko via email :)

eta: pra-- yes, the little I can understand refers to huge investment, but there's a number of other places that have disappeared. If it's the same chef I assume it's also the same food.
sandwiches that are large and filling and do not contain tuna or prawns

#26 Adrian

Adrian

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 9,855 posts

Posted 28 April 2011 - 01:45 PM

Yes, I saw dekay's reports, it's sort of amusing how last time we went there was simply no information available (except Zagat, which only published one edition) and now it's a contest between bloggers for who breaks into the most restaurants where they're not at all welcome.


For better or worse, I think that you can thank Michelin for that. Whether the guide is accurate or not, I think it spurred a ton of interest in Japan by offering an accessible baseline by which the international dining types could start planning their visits.

I think you need to interpret what I'm saying in a reasonable way.


#27 Eatmywords

Eatmywords

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 649 posts

Posted 28 April 2011 - 02:18 PM

Should you be in the area, the mall above Shibuya station has a food court with several eateries (don’t be put off) one of which a Tonkatsu restaurant called Maisen. It was recommended by Raji (of EG) and it did not disappoint. Best rosu (fatty) katsu we ever had. (fyi, this was 3yrs ago)

#28 prasantrin

prasantrin

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 7,322 posts

Posted 02 May 2011 - 11:52 AM

http://josephmallozzi.wordpress.com/ is another blog for Japanese eating. His experiences are a couple of years back, but he ate a lot in a short period of time. (He used to post in eG, too, but I don't think he does much now.).

#29 Orik

Orik

    Advanced Member

  • Technocrat
  • PipPipPip
  • 21,698 posts

Posted 27 May 2011 - 03:12 PM

Should you be in the area, the mall above Shibuya station has a food court with several eateries (don't be put off) one of which a Tonkatsu restaurant called Maisen. It was recommended by Raji (of EG) and it did not disappoint. Best rosu (fatty) katsu we ever had. (fyi, this was 3yrs ago)


Maisen seems to be one of two Tonkatsu restaurants that are recommended often, the other being Butagumi:

http://www.timelessf...7/butagumi.html

I'm sort of torn between disbelief that pork schnitzel is going to be good enough that I'll want to have it instead of something else and the thought that it might be that good after all.

In a city known for some extremely difficult reservations (although most of them are easier at the moment because people are allergic to caesium 137), I think Sushi Mitani takes the cake - they are booked solid for the next six months Posted Image
sandwiches that are large and filling and do not contain tuna or prawns

#30 Eatmywords

Eatmywords

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 649 posts

Posted 27 May 2011 - 04:09 PM

From the blogger and what I remember, Maisen, being in a mall obviously offers less of an experience but considerably less expensive, easy to get into (no res required) and in a very central location.

We thought it was a good call after a couple days of kaiten sushi, ramen and yakitori. But yea, if you’re not into katsu to begin with. Assuming you’re there a while why not one good meal of this type?

We didn’t do any hi end sushi (this was the first leg of a long somewhat budgeted trip). Tho we did do the touristo thing at the Tsukiji market and ate at Sushi Dai at 8am. That was the best sushi we had in Japan. I’d be curious to see firsthand how the market has suffered/recovered.