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Adam Platt: "Where to Eat 2009"


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#1 Wilfrid1

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Posted 05 January 2009 - 11:58 PM

I did enjoy the lengthy review of 2008, thinly disguised as a preview of 2009, in New York magazine. Adam Platt takes the byline, but the cynic in me did wonder whether other hands had been in the pot. After all, Platty surely can't mean every word of this...

Duck goulash at Dovetail. Sounds nice, but why is it a "country delicacy"? It sounds Hungarian and less than delicate to me.

Momofuku Ko isn't "harder to crack than Fort Knox", or I'd be a very rich man. Oh, okay, re-calibrate my hyperbole monitor. Done.

The price of dinner at Ko is compared favorably with the "city's other great omakase restaurant, Masa". Ko is an omakase restaurant? I guess it means that there's only one menu, the chef's choice. Maybe there are only two such restaurants in the city, and if so we know which one's cheaper. But it's not an obvious way to look at it (how about, Ko is more expensive than Degustation a few minutes walk away?).

Speaking of omakase, I was surprised to learn that "haughty Japanese food snobs used to idle away their time at refined sushi institutions like Morimoto, Soto and Sushi Zen..." Morimoto is refined? And how long does it take to become an institution these days? Soto serves good sushi indeed, but it's made by one of the assistant chefs: Soto-san himself prepares more complex cold appetizers, his wife prepares hot food in the kitchen. And Sushi Zen. Yes, not the most obvious example, is it?

I note also that paella at Socarrat is "hoisted to the table in giant cast-iron salvers". I assumed they'd just be using the regular paellera, or paella pan as one might say. But no, "salvers" no less.

Equally startling, Elettaria's status as a "little" restaurant. My goodness, what does that make Dirt Candy or Gigot or Graffiti? Elettaria is postiviely spacious, rambling even, by Village standards. But then again, Adour is an example of a restaurant with a "stripped-down" look, and where does that leave Double Crown? My memory of shimmering glass-bead curtains must be faulty. At least it's not beige, because Platty is "tired of" the "tobacco barn" trend - except where he likes to "slouch at the long, tobacco-colored bar" of Char No.4.

But hey, kudos for saltuing Allegretti's "carefully rendered Provencal treats" this time around, without a lot of implausible fuss about Westchester grandmothers or vast baronial fortunes (hyperbole, check) which bedevilled his October review. And high five over Five Napkin Burger, a favorite with his eight-year old daughter; my likewise loved the burger at Nice Matin, so I'm sure she'll like it here too.

Burp.
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#2 Sneakeater

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Posted 06 January 2009 - 12:05 AM

QUOTE(Wilfrid @ Jan 5 2009, 11:58 PM)  
Sounds nice, but why is it a "country delicacy"?


There's a possible answer to that in Hamlet. But I always thought more of uni along those lines.

QUOTE(Wilfrid @ Jan 5 2009, 11:58 PM)  
And Sushi Zen. Yes, not the most obvious example, is it?


That place sure has been getting a lot of hype lately, hasn't it? Maybe they hired a new publicist.
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#3 Wilfrid1

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Posted 06 January 2009 - 12:22 AM

Unnecessary, as the snobby cognoscenti pack it nightly.

(You know, I honestly don't believe Platt would come up with that, but he should be checking it.)

I shall pass swiftly over the question of kippers.
Elect-a-lujah

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If the author could go around the place hitting random readers with a rubber hammer, the Pink Pig would still be worth a visit.

#4 Guest_Aaron T_*

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Posted 06 January 2009 - 12:30 AM

QUOTE(Wilfrid @ Jan 5 2009, 03:58 PM)  
Duck goulash at Dovetail. Sounds nice, but why is it a "country delicacy"? It sounds Hungarian and less than delicate to me.


I had never made the connection between delicacies and delicate. If goulash is a special dish of renown in Hungary, I would refer to it as a Hungarian delicacy, regardless of how dainty it is or is not.

#5 nuxvomica

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Posted 06 January 2009 - 12:36 AM

don't get me started rolleyes.gif
“Eat me,’’ it says. “Eat me and die.’’ -- Jonathan Gold

Everything is always OK in the end. If it's not OK, then it's not the end.

#6 rozrapp

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Posted 06 January 2009 - 01:18 AM

QUOTE
The great hubcap-size veal alla Milanese is my favorite dish at Joe and Jason Denton's trendy new establishment, Bar Milano....


Seems odd that Platt included this since Bar Milano is no more.

#7 Wilfrid1

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Posted 06 January 2009 - 02:31 AM

QUOTE(Aaron T @ Jan 5 2009, 07:30 PM)  
QUOTE(Wilfrid @ Jan 5 2009, 03:58 PM)  
Duck goulash at Dovetail. Sounds nice, but why is it a "country delicacy"? It sounds Hungarian and less than delicate to me.


I had never made the connection between delicacies and delicate. If goulash is a special dish of renown in Hungary, I would refer to it as a Hungarian delicacy, regardless of how dainty it is or is not.


Mm. We need a thread on differences between delikat, deli, delicacy, delicate, etc. ... I mean, you're not wrong at all, but I am not planning to do the research right now. I always found it funny that something like a gala pie could be called a "delicacy" in the context of British food. Yes, right, but...delicate?



My eyes, the goggles do not work!!!

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If the author could go around the place hitting random readers with a rubber hammer, the Pink Pig would still be worth a visit.

#8 Wilfrid1

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Posted 06 January 2009 - 02:34 AM

QUOTE(rozrapp @ Jan 5 2009, 08:18 PM)  
QUOTE
The great hubcap-size veal alla Milanese is my favorite dish at Joe and Jason Denton's trendy new establishment, Bar Milano....


Seems odd that Platt included this since Bar Milano is no more.


Other than my mental picture of Platt dictating the outlines of the piece - Winston Churchill style - to a hall full of scribes, who then scuttled off to cast its final form, I can also conceive it being something that was written by him over an extended period (and still could have been checked).
Elect-a-lujah

***Every Monday***At the Sign of the Pink Pig.

If the author could go around the place hitting random readers with a rubber hammer, the Pink Pig would still be worth a visit.