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#10861 Sneakeater

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Posted 15 September 2019 - 02:19 AM

Two.
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#10862 Sneakeater

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Posted 15 September 2019 - 02:20 AM

Plus the McGough & McGear project, of course.
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#10863 Wilfrid

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Posted 15 September 2019 - 03:31 AM

I always felt Gorman was the talent. Like Chas Smash or Bez.

#10864 Sneakeater

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Posted 15 September 2019 - 05:52 PM

Bach: Concertos for 2, 3 & 4 Harpsichords/Concerto for Flute, Violin & Harpsichord (Mortensen/Pinnock/Spaans/Mohlin/Bircher/Kraemer//Concerto Copenhagen)

Jerusalem Quartet: The Yiddish Cabaret (Korngold: String Quartet No. 2//Schulhoff: Five Pieces for String Quartet//Leonid Desyatnikov: Yiddish -- 5 Songs for Voice and String Quartet)

Aldous Harding: Designer

Kate Moore: Dances and Canons (Saskia Lankhoorn)
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#10865 Sneakeater

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Posted 16 September 2019 - 02:55 AM

You made me re-listen to the first This Heat album last night, and I didn’t remember there were some rockist guitar moments in it. Okay, maybe Frippy, but still rockist. Charles Hayward is remarkably restrained in the cause of industrial austerity.

 

This is actually a sort of general thing I've noticed.  If you listen to records that are early examples of some style you had thought was highly disruptive, they as often as not sound surprisingly like the style they supposedly superseded.

 

Listen to the first Mothers of Invention album, for example:  a lot of it sounds a lot like LA garage rock.  The first Captain Beefheart album sounds a lot like LA garage blues-rock.  But both were hailed (or reviled) upon release as disruptive breakthroughs.

 

Or, for another example, the first Soft Machine album.  An awful lot of it now sounds like mid/late-'60s British rock.

 

I don't think it's so much that the artists' visions hadn't crystalized yet on these early works.  I think it's more that it's harder to transcend your surroundings than you think.  I often think that the later music of artists like this sounds different not because they've more fully realized their styles, but rather because their own influence has helped cause the surrounding music to change (in the case of almost every one of these artists -- not Beefheart -- not for the better), and they're just reflecting that.


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#10866 hollywood

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Posted 16 September 2019 - 02:59 AM

Hey, we've got some big garages out here.


Then that happened.

 

I traveled to Tijuana to smack the federali

Who packing avocado toast like Mario Batali--Black Thought


#10867 Sneakeater

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Posted 16 September 2019 - 04:26 AM

Mozart:  Piano Concertos Nos. 5, 6 & 8 (Schiff//Végh/Camerata Academica des Mozarteum Salzburg) (the liner notes to this huge box of Schiff's Mozart recordings set up a sort of battle of the bands between Schiff and Perahia/Uchida/Lupu, and I have to say that I prefer Perahia/Uchida/Lupu; but I also say that, especially at these ridiculously reduced prices, I don't have to choose) (also, the conducting of Sandor Végh is like PERFECT)

 

Beethoven:  String Quartets Nos. 1, 4 & 6 (Artemis Quartet)

 

The Suso/Glass Quartet:  Introducing the Suso/Glass Quartet

 

Ty Segall:  First Taste

 

Mason Bates:  Digital Loom

 

Quartette Oblique:  Quartette Oblique

 

Tchaikovsky:  18 Pieces/Chopin:  Nocturne No. 20 (Pletnev)


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#10868 Wilfrid

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Posted 16 September 2019 - 03:45 PM

 

You made me re-listen to the first This Heat album last night, and I didn’t remember there were some rockist guitar moments in it. Okay, maybe Frippy, but still rockist. Charles Hayward is remarkably restrained in the cause of industrial austerity.

 

This is actually a sort of general thing I've noticed.  If you listen to records that are early examples of some style you had thought was highly disruptive, they as often as not sound surprisingly like the style they supposedly superseded.

 

Listen to the first Mothers of Invention album, for example:  a lot of it sounds a lot like LA garage rock.  The first Captain Beefheart album sounds a lot like LA garage blues-rock.  But both were hailed (or reviled) upon release as disruptive breakthroughs.

 

Or, for another example, the first Soft Machine album.  An awful lot of it now sounds like mid/late-'60s British rock.

 

I don't think it's so much that the artists' visions hadn't crystalized yet on these early works.  I think it's more that it's harder to transcend your surroundings than you think.  I often think that the later music of artists like this sounds different not because they've more fully realized their styles, but rather because their own influence has helped cause the surrounding music to change (in the case of almost every one of these artists -- not Beefheart -- not for the better), and they're just reflecting that.

 

 

I think it's also hard to put yourself in the position of the audience for the music when it first appeared.  Anyone listening to the Sex Pistols now would understandably wonder what was so new about them, following the Small Faces and The Who.  But in the context those first singles were released, they were disruptive.  If one regards PiL as the equivalent of late Pistols, I think your last point applies well.



#10869 Sneakeater

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Posted 17 September 2019 - 02:09 AM

Mozart:  Piano Concertos Nos. 9 & 17 (Schiff//Végh/Camerata Academia des Mozarteum Salzburg)

 

Spectrum:  Refractions:  Thru the Rhythms of Time 1989-1997 (shoot me:  I LOVE this stuff)

 

Bill Frissell/Thomas Morgan:  Epistrophy

 

Respighi:  Sinfonia Drammatica/Belfagor (Neschling/Orchestre Philharmonique Royal de Liège) (essentially junk)

 

Jeri Southern:  The Warm Singing Style of Jeri Southern:  The Complete Decca Years Vol. 3 1957

 

Joseph Payne:  'The Queens's Command':  Masterpieces of Elizabethan Keyboard Music (by Gibbons/Bull/Tisdale/Farnaby/Dowland/Byrd)

 

Edward Thomas:  Anna Christie (Basile/Estabrooks/Hermalyn/Long/Pirozzi//Wachner/NOVUS NY) (OK, even I recognize that my Melanie Long obsession is getting a bit unhealthy)


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#10870 Sneakeater

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Posted 17 September 2019 - 02:50 AM

Well, at least I didn't fly out to Whitefish, Montana this summer.


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#10871 Sneakeater

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Posted 17 September 2019 - 10:19 PM

Beethoven:  String Quartets Nos. 2, 3 & 5 (Artemis Quartet)

 

Suk:  Asrael/Fairy Tale (Bélohlávek/Czech Philharmonic)

 

Dave Douglas & Brass Ecstasy:  Rare Metals

 

Matmos:  Plastic Anniversary


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#10872 Sneakeater

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Posted 18 September 2019 - 12:40 AM

OMG I’m now sitting at the next table to Melanie Long.
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#10873 Sneakeater

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Posted 18 September 2019 - 12:41 AM

God give me strength.
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#10874 Sneakeater

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Posted 18 September 2019 - 05:04 AM

FALSE ALARM. It wasn’t Melanie. It was my other current NYC opera singer obsession.


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#10875 Sneakeater

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Posted 18 September 2019 - 09:34 PM

Stravinsky: Perséphone (Staples/Chevilier//Salonen/Finnish National Opera Orchestra, Chorus & Children's Chorus)

Joan Morris & William Bolcom: The Girl on the Magazine Cover: Songs of Irving Berlin

Rossini: Il Barbiere di Siviglia (Callas/Alva/Gobbi//Galliera/Philharmonia Orchestra & Chorus)

Celestine's Original Tuxedo Jazz Orchestra/Sam Morgan's Jazz Band: Recorded in New Orleans 1925-1928: The Complete Recordings in Chronological Order

Lianne La Havas: Blood
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