Jump to content


Photo

Kajitsu


  • Please log in to reply
46 replies to this topic

#1 Orik

Orik

    Advanced Member

  • Technocrat
  • PipPipPip
  • 21,007 posts

Posted 22 April 2009 - 08:26 PM

Probably more fairly reviewed by someone who does not get all murderous and suicidal after eating this kind of food, Kajitsu is a vegan Japanese that recently opened on 9th Street (in the space that formerly housed Ebisu).

Actually vegan is a bit of a liberal description, this kind of Buddhist cooking is not meant to be satisfying, rather it is similar to the ultimate conclusion of what Alice Waters et al. are suggesting - it's sustainable, organic, seasonal, healthy, carefully handled and beautifully presented.

It feels like you've eaten less than nothing. Konyaku with kale and radish, cold soba, sesame tofu, mochi, very light broth with turnips... the only thing that registers as food is the vegetable tempura.

It's also not "seasonal" in the strict sense (what's that tomato doing there? where's the asparagus from? I guess just turnips wouldn't cut it). Rather, in keeping with the more reasonable Japanese interpretation of the word, things are supposed to be in season somewhere.


Anyway, highly recommended for your vegan friends who thrive on self denial, a mere curiosity for the rest of the world.
sandwiches that are large and filling and do not contain tuna or prawns

#2 Anthony Bonner

Anthony Bonner

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 13,892 posts

Posted 22 April 2009 - 08:50 PM

QUOTE(Orik @ Apr 22 2009, 04:26 PM) View Post
this kind of Buddhist cooking is not meant to be satisfying


Are you editorializing or is this actually how they approach food?

"This is a battle of who blinks first, and we've cut off our eyelids"


#3 Sneakeater

Sneakeater

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 61,258 posts

Posted 22 April 2009 - 08:55 PM

What is the sound of one lip smacking?
Bar Loser

MF Old

#4 Rich

Rich

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 8,097 posts

Posted 22 April 2009 - 08:56 PM

QUOTE(Sneakeater @ Apr 22 2009, 04:55 PM) View Post
What is the sound of one lip smacking?

thud

#5 Orik

Orik

    Advanced Member

  • Technocrat
  • PipPipPip
  • 21,007 posts

Posted 22 April 2009 - 09:22 PM

QUOTE(Anthony Bonner @ Apr 22 2009, 04:50 PM) View Post
QUOTE(Orik @ Apr 22 2009, 04:26 PM) View Post
this kind of Buddhist cooking is not meant to be satisfying


Are you editorializing or is this actually how they approach food?


Jinmyo is the right person to explain the religious background. It's meant to be satisfying in some other ways, but many of them are not on the plate.

Kyoto style Kaiseki is basically an expansion of this food, but they've added a lot of flavor-carriers, which increases the mass appeal (there's quite a market for the vegan/temple style in Kyoto, but I don't know that they don't go and have burgers or fried fish for dinners after a vegan lunch, I'm sure there'd be many suicides otherwise)
sandwiches that are large and filling and do not contain tuna or prawns

#6 djk

djk

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 529 posts

Posted 23 April 2009 - 12:03 AM

ahaha! thud.

i walked by before it opened and thought it looked pretty. being a pescatarian, i was excited about the possibilities here. but maybe now only after having dinner somewhere else first. thanks.

#7 foodie52

foodie52

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 6,345 posts

Posted 23 April 2009 - 12:17 AM

btw, admins SUCK
[size="4"]Visit our website for updates...Friends of Colombian Orphans

Donations are always gratefully accepted.

#8 TaliesinNYC

TaliesinNYC

    Advanced Member

  • Validating
  • PipPipPip
  • 5,291 posts

Posted 23 April 2009 - 10:00 PM

QUOTE(foodie52 @ Apr 23 2009, 12:17 AM) View Post
btw, admins SUCK



???

#9 TaliesinNYC

TaliesinNYC

    Advanced Member

  • Validating
  • PipPipPip
  • 5,291 posts

Posted 23 April 2009 - 10:02 PM

QUOTE(Orik @ Apr 22 2009, 09:22 PM) View Post
QUOTE(Anthony Bonner @ Apr 22 2009, 04:50 PM) View Post
QUOTE(Orik @ Apr 22 2009, 04:26 PM) View Post
this kind of Buddhist cooking is not meant to be satisfying


Are you editorializing or is this actually how they approach food?


Jinmyo is the right person to explain the religious background. It's meant to be satisfying in some other ways, but many of them are not on the plate.

Kyoto style Kaiseki is basically an expansion of this food, but they've added a lot of flavor-carriers, which increases the mass appeal (there's quite a market for the vegan/temple style in Kyoto, but I don't know that they don't go and have burgers or fried fish for dinners after a vegan lunch, I'm sure there'd be many suicides otherwise)



this description reminds me of omen [the restaurant in soho]

#10 The Scream

The Scream

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 6,186 posts

Posted 24 April 2009 - 07:13 AM

Korean Buddhist food is pretty tasty, no bulgogi, kalbi or pork belly, but still tasty.
Gone fishing for the summer.

#11 beachfan

beachfan

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,383 posts

Posted 24 April 2009 - 07:21 AM

QUOTE(Orik @ Apr 22 2009, 01:26 PM) View Post
Probably more fairly reviewed by someone who does not get all murderous and suicidal after eating this kind of food, Kajitsu is a vegan Japanese that recently opened on 9th Street (in the space that formerly housed Ebisu).

Actually vegan is a bit of a liberal description, this kind of Buddhist cooking is not meant to be satisfying, rather it is similar to the ultimate conclusion of what Alice Waters et al. are suggesting - it's sustainable, organic, seasonal, healthy, carefully handled and beautifully presented.

It feels like you've eaten less than nothing. Konyaku with kale and radish, cold soba, sesame tofu, mochi, very light broth with turnips... the only thing that registers as food is the vegetable tempura.

It's also not "seasonal" in the strict sense (what's that tomato doing there? where's the asparagus from? I guess just turnips wouldn't cut it). Rather, in keeping with the more reasonable Japanese interpretation of the word, things are supposed to be in season somewhere.


Anyway, highly recommended for your vegan friends who thrive on self denial, a mere curiosity for the rest of the world.


Why would you go there, was there any possibility you would like it?

Personally, I'm not a vegetarian, but I love that type of food.

#12 nuxvomica

nuxvomica

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 5,706 posts

Posted 24 April 2009 - 12:04 PM

QUOTE(Orik @ Apr 22 2009, 08:26 PM) View Post
It's also not "seasonal" in the strict sense (what's that tomato doing there? where's the asparagus from? I guess just turnips wouldn't cut it). Rather, in keeping with the more reasonable Japanese interpretation of the word, things are supposed to be in season somewhere.


oh, if i had a dollar for every time i hear a chef say "everything is in season somewhere"
“Eat me,’’ it says. “Eat me and die.’’ -- Jonathan Gold

Everything is always OK in the end. If it's not OK, then it's not the end.

#13 Orik

Orik

    Advanced Member

  • Technocrat
  • PipPipPip
  • 21,007 posts

Posted 24 April 2009 - 01:19 PM

QUOTE(beachfan @ Apr 24 2009, 03:21 AM) View Post
Why would you go there, was there any possibility you would like it?

Personally, I'm not a vegetarian, but I love that type of food.


Friends.

If you love that type of food than this is a restaurant you might want to try, although Kyoya, a couple of blocks away, delivers a much better experience without the religion.
sandwiches that are large and filling and do not contain tuna or prawns

#14 StephanieL

StephanieL

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 10,053 posts

Posted 24 April 2009 - 08:43 PM

It sounds a lot like Hangawi, the vegan Korean place.

"Socialism never took root in America because the poor see themselves not as an exploited proletariat but as temporarily embarrassed millionaires." --John Steinbeck

 

"Insanity runs in my family.  It practically gallops."--Arsenic and Old Lace

 


#15 Wilfrid

Wilfrid

    Advanced Member

  • Admin
  • PipPipPip
  • 84,161 posts

Posted 08 March 2010 - 03:53 PM

Not only nice food, but nice light for photos too.

A review at the Pig.