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The Platt Thread


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#46 TaliesinNYC

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Posted 05 June 2010 - 04:54 PM

QUOTE
But the most notable changes at Annisa 2.0 take place on the plate. With its mannered size and mingling of classical and fusion influences (Lo, who is Asian-American, trained with Guy Savoy and David Bouley, among others), the original Annisa was an almost perfect expression of the dainty fine-dining sensibilities of the nineties. Now that sensibility has been refocused with a whole fresh range of recipes and ingredients. “This thing’s the #*@$ bomb!” declared one of the jaded Wall Street high rollers at my table as he tasted our little predinner amuse, which consisted of a single escargot sunk in a thimble-size pastry cup filled with a fiendishly delicious substance called bacon cream. It was followed by a slightly overflavored Korean version of steak tartare (served with sweet chile and diced Asian pear), and a cup of hot, silken Japanese egg custard, called chawan mushi, folded with morels, crisped lotus root, and nuggets of fresh uni. The chef’s famous foie gras soup dumplings are still on the appetizer menu (although they weren’t as soupy as I recall), but now you can complement them with curls of fresh barbecued squid (soaked in lemongrass and Thai fish sauce, and set over a bed of edamame and boiled peanuts) and an inventive seasonal riff on steamed clams, which Lo composes with fried clam necks seized in a light tempura batter, clam bellies with chive buds, and a cool disk of clam tartare sprinkled with garlic chive sauce.

The entrées tend to be less aggressively Asian in their influences, and only one of them (an excessively sweet combination of fluke, caviar, and beets) received less than rave reviews from the crowd of tasters at my table. As an homage to the haute-barnyard movement, Lo serves up a plump segment of chicken breast crisped on its exterior, stuffed with a delicately gamy preparation of pig’s trotter and chanterelles, and served with a sherry truffle-oil sauce. My order of grilled squab over puréed fava beans was slightly overcooked, but no one complained about the perfectly pink veal tenderloin, which is garnished with crispy sweetbreads, artichokes, and hidden little deposits of fresh oysters. The butter-poached lobster I sampled (pink lobster, green sweet-pea flan, greener ramps) had an almost peachy sweetness to it, and so did the fillet of sable, which Lo marinates in miso in the time-honored Nobu style, balances on a block of crispy silken tofu, and sets in a steamy bonito broth scattered with drifts of popping, ruby-red flying-fish roe.



Three for Annisa.


http://nymag.com/res.../reviews/66274/

#47 Wilfrid

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Posted 05 June 2010 - 05:28 PM

A very positive and compelling review, I thought.

#48 TaliesinNYC

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Posted 11 August 2010 - 04:39 PM

Since Sifty is off this week...

But with Richter’s help, Pelaccio is the first to combine the classic salty-sweet flavor profile of the East with the bulky, messy, down-home goodness of authentic American barbecue. His excellent Bobo chicken (named for the famed upstate chickens favored by Chinatown restaurants) is half a bird, smoked by Richter and his minions, cut in quarters, and served with a tangy Vietnamese-style dipping sauce made with chopped cucumber, red onion, and chiles. The lamb shoulder is wood-smoked, then pulled off the bone and served, the way they do it in Muslim restaurants in Kuala Lumpur and Xi’an, with wedges of toasted pita and a bowl of garlic-flavored goat yogurt garnished with sprigs of mint.


It seems Adam agrees with him.


http://nymag.com/res.../reviews/67376/

#49 TaliesinNYC

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Posted 14 September 2010 - 07:22 PM

Adam doesn't care for Terroir TrBeCa, much less for the ill-named Il Matto.\


But like lots of master chefs, he’s been cultivating a more populist small-plates repertoire lately, one designed to facilitate the consumption of beer, profitable cocktails, and, of course, wine. There are fourteen types of cheese available at the new Terroir outlet (compared with eight at the original); a profusion of sandwiches, salads, and assorted finger foods (try the fried risotto balls with oxtail); and even a steak entrée, cut from dry-aged Creekstone beef.

Like the original Terroir, the menu at Terroir Tribeca is an antic document filled with numerous sections and subsections (there are eight), along with a tasting option of unspecified price and content called “Just Put Your Ass in the Seat and Let Us Feed You.” This food isn’t designed to be transcendent, but if you choose wisely, it’s possible to put together a decent meal.



But the real chaos at Il Matto takes place on the plate. Chef and co-owner Matteo Boglione pairs olive-crusted sea scallops with almond foam, folds his flat-tasting lasagne with spelt, and touches curls of octopus with an unfortunate substance called “lard cream.” Some of these concepts actually work (the pappardelle with osso buco ragù is laced with an inventive bone-marrow zabaglione, for instance), but the real problem lies in the execution. The recipient of a dish called “peanut crusted chicken” claimed it tasted like “a mixture of drywall and peanut butter,” the foie gras–stuffed beef tenderloin was stringy, and my tuna entrée was cooked to an unpleasant grayness and set on the plate with a dreckish black-olive sauce and the remnants of a hairy artichoke heart. If you survive this gauntlet of self-conscious, inconsistent grub, you will be rewarded with some interesting desserts. The quirkiest is a mille-feuille built with slivers of eggplant. The most satisfying is an old-fashioned tiramisu, which is soaked, mercifully, with plenty of Amaretto.



http://nymag.com/res.../reviews/68048/

#50 Daisy

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Posted 14 September 2010 - 07:26 PM

Platt describes Marco Canora as a 'master chef' who is lately come to the small plates thing. Uh, Craftbar?

And the review struck me as more positive than Taliesin makes it out to be.
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#51 Wilfrid

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Posted 08 October 2010 - 03:34 PM

Not Platty, but Lisa Taddeo in last week's NYM (I am behind) shares credit with her editor, I suppose, for introducing us to Fergus Anderson of St John [sic].

She can't be blamed, I suppose, if Jonathan Waxman is prepared to say:

"We were desperate for the gastropub experience,” says Barbuto chef Jonathan Waxman. “It’s such an English sensibility, to drink beer and eat at the bar..."

The reverse is the case. As far as meals go (not pork pies and sandwiches), there is nothing English about eating at the bar. That's what Americans do. It took me some time to recover from the culture shock of seeing lines of people at ordinary bars hunched over their dinners. English people, even - in fact especially - in gastropubs generally eat at tables. Bars are for drinking.

I am also cautious about Taddeo's assertions that chef Bloomfield grew up eating pig's feet and pig's ears. Maybe that's what she told her - but it would be quite rare to find anyone of Bloomfield's age eating anything like that growing up. Unless her dad was a butcher maybe. Yes, the English do eat liver and kidneys more than Americans, but I didn't eat a pig's foot until I went to Germany, and didn't even see pig's ears (except on a pig) until I went to Spain.

If English butchers now carry pig's ear for sale, it will be a recent result of foodie-ness. Thank Fergus Anderson and Gary Roads. :lol:

#52 nuxvomica

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Posted 08 October 2010 - 05:59 PM

which is why i can't (and don't) read this stuff. seeing the accompanying image of St. April was enough


actually, i was surprised she went for it. she always seemed very level-headed and modest.
“Eat me,’’ it says. “Eat me and die.’’ -- Jonathan Gold

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#53 Sneakeater

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Posted 30 December 2010 - 03:30 AM

So Adam Platt has named Tien Ho one of the best (or maybe the best) new NYC chefs of 2010.

I'm glad to see Chef Ho get recognition, of course.

But could anyone with any knowledge at all call him "new"?

The ignorance of the NYC Food Journalism Establishment continues to amaze me.
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#54 nuxvomica

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Posted 30 December 2010 - 01:46 PM

So Adam Platt has named Tien Ho one of the best (or maybe the best) NYC chefs of 2010.

I'm glad to see Chef Ho get recognition, of course.

But could anyone with any knowledge at all call him "new"?

The ignorance of the NYC Food Journalism Establishment continues to amaze me.

:lol:

welcome to my life.

guess you don't even try to open another weekly publication that covers food/restaurants and bars?
“Eat me,’’ it says. “Eat me and die.’’ -- Jonathan Gold

Everything is always OK in the end. If it's not OK, then it's not the end.

#55 nuxvomica

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Posted 30 December 2010 - 01:56 PM

this is more about the magazine than Platt per se and and online rather than print but still - the recent Xmas & NYE dining guides focused on places in the 20s and below (in Manhattan) and Brooklyn. because nothing of culinary interest ever happens anywhere else in this town. Perfect reflection of what the writers know and where they go themselves (except for the occasional "hosted" trip to Daniel, etc.)
“Eat me,’’ it says. “Eat me and die.’’ -- Jonathan Gold

Everything is always OK in the end. If it's not OK, then it's not the end.

#56 oakapple

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Posted 31 December 2010 - 09:14 PM

So Adam Platt has named Tien Ho one of the best (or maybe the best) new NYC chefs of 2010.

I'm glad to see Chef Ho get recognition, of course.

But could anyone with any knowledge at all call him "new"?

The ignorance of the NYC Food Journalism Establishment continues to amaze me.

Although Platt is one of the most clueless food writers around, I think even he realizes that Ma Peche wasn't Tien Ho's first job in the restaurant industry. The convention is to refer to a chef as "new" when he is in charge for the first time, however long he may have toiled as someone else's underboss.
Marc Shepherd
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#57 Sneakeater

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Posted 01 January 2011 - 01:53 AM

He was just as "in charge" of Ssam Bar as he is of Ma Peche.
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#58 oakapple

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Posted 28 February 2011 - 03:47 PM

Here's a really moronic "scratchpad" from the Plattster today, reviewing the new Indian restaurant Junoon:

Three stars for ambition and the varied menu, minus one star for the stilted surroundings.

Now, it so happens I don't think Junoon is a three-star restaurant anyway, so he happens to arrive at the right rating (two stars) by accident. But that "stilted room" is simply a very nice room, albeit not the faux farmhouse that Platt would probably prefer to dine in.

I'm getting rather tired of critics deducting stars for elegant rooms that happen not to be their cup of tea.
Marc Shepherd
Editor, New York Journal

#59 Sneakeater

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Posted 28 September 2015 - 09:09 PM

At least Adam Platt's daughter seems actively interested in eating in restaurants.


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#60 Lex

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Posted 28 September 2015 - 09:20 PM

I thought that review was particularly lame.  Platt, whatever his faults, is a professional critic.  His 15 year old daughter is not.  McGarry, OTOH, is charging $160 for his tasting menu.  Those are adult prices, not amateur teenage cook prices.  Platt should have reviewed the place.  Turning over the reins to his 15 daughter was a device for him to avoid obviously pulling his punches or overpraising a pop up that doesn't deserve it.

 

McGarry didn't open a pop up that caters to 15 year old tastes - he opened an adult place at adult prices.


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