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#2401 Anthony Bonner

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Posted 22 February 2015 - 05:32 PM

Yeah. But the frappato used to be on the low 20s here.

"This is a battle of who blinks first, and we've cut off our eyelids"


#2402 Sneakeater

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Posted 23 February 2015 - 06:10 AM

Roast wood pigeon on toast. Steamed brussels sprouts on the side. And -- what the hell -- some leftover M. Wells Steakhouse foie gras gnocchi, just to make sure this dinner was rich enough.

Of course I overseasoned and overcooked the pigeon. And it was STILL fucking great.

As Wingding said, next stop: pigeon stock!

Thanks to RF for giving me the pigeon. When he cooked it, it was resplendent. Mine was only shockingly good (for something I cooked).

I used some held-back Brancaia Tre in cooking the bird. But it was pretty obvious what I was going to drink with it.

2007 Domaine Bachelet Cote de Nuits-Villages

Not a great year. But, in a way, a year like that is when a great producer like this can show their stuff in their lower-level wines. (As is well known, in lesser vintages, sometimes the lower-level wines get more of the better grapes, as producers select rigorously to preserve the quality of their senior cuvees.)

Anyway, this isn't a wine anyone will get excited about. But it is one that anyone will enjoy very greatly. You drink a nice Burgundy and you wonder why you ever drink anything else. Well, one reason rhymes with "lice". (Another clue: it's the last name of the keyboard player for the Animals.) But you can see why Burgundy has conquered the wine world. It's as profound as Barolo -- but easier. Indeed, it's easier than anything. It's like Mozart: very deep, but very enjoyable on the surface. But it's a lot funkier than Mozart.

Indeed, Burgundy is so hip that you can't imagine the natural winemakers getting any traction there. Sure, they revolutionized Beaujolais. But the only thing you could do to make Burgundy better would be to make it cheaper.

Anyway, I quite like this wine. I think this is my last bottle. I bid it a fond farewell.
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#2403 Sneakeater

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Posted 24 February 2015 - 05:47 AM

Leftover pappardelle with pork shank/leek ragu. Sauteed Savoy cabbage on the side.

A bang-up pairing.

2013 Ampeleia Unlitro

Few know that the divine Elisabetta Foradori is involved with a concern that makes wine in the Maremma with non-native French grapes (Grenache, Carignan, Mourvedre, Cab Franc, Merlot). Of course their wines are biodynamic and all, but still: non-native French grapes.* Elisabetta being Elisabetta, however, their wines -- or rather the one wine of theirs I previously tried, the moderately pricy Kepos -- are simply excellent.

Even fewer know that the Ampeleia concern makes a cheap wine: Unlitro, sold (duh) by the liter, $19.99 at Passage de la Fleur. I didn't know about it until I stumbled upon it on the shelves there. ("I call it the Beaujolais of Italy," Fifi said when I told him of my happy surprise at its existence.)

Ampeleia's website says this wine consists of Grenache, Carignan, and Alicante Bouschet (aged in cement). Passage says it also contains Sangiovese, Mourvedre, and Marselan. In a blend like this, who can know?

Sure is tasty, though. Bright and brambly. No discernible tannins. Acid. That barnyard aftertaste some of us love in natural wines.

Not much to think about here. But a lot to enjoy on the way down. (Not with any food that's too heavy, though.)

You heard that it's $19.99 for a liter, right?

______________________________________________________________
* Their website seeks to elide the issue by referring to what they grow as grapes "[o]riginating from the Near East" that "are often found in Mediterranean farmlands." Bullfuckingshit. These are French grapes not native to Tuscany.
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#2404 Sneakeater

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Posted 24 February 2015 - 05:57 AM

Yeah. But the frappato used to be on the low 20s here.


The Intelligent Drinker would say that it's inevitable that good winemakers will be recognized by the market -- but that it's no big deal because there are always new ones to discover while they're still cheap.

My problem is that I tend to stay with my favorites. I mean, I haven't even abandoned Ganevat yet -- and God knows his prices have skyrocketed.

But I'm on the verge, in that case.
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#2405 Patrick

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Posted 24 February 2015 - 08:01 AM

Ganevat is interesting enough(depending on the cuvee) for me to begrudgingly suffer price increases. He is quickly going the way of Overnoy in terms of availability and price. Gahier and Octavin still make good enough wines that i wouldn't be sad not to pay those prices. 

 

On the other hand, I've yet to taste anything from Arianna that would make me think it can sustain the continual price increases. Then again, I prefer the COS wines to hers.   



#2406 Anthony Bonner

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Posted 24 February 2015 - 11:03 AM

I actually prefer the COS wines too.


But I think you guys are crazy to pay the current market for Ganevat and its only laziness that keeps me from selling my overnoy

"This is a battle of who blinks first, and we've cut off our eyelids"


#2407 Sneakeater

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Posted 24 February 2015 - 01:53 PM

I prefer COS, too. I think Arianna makes good inexpensive wines. No matter how much they charge for them, that's still what they are.
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#2408 Patrick

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Posted 24 February 2015 - 05:58 PM

I actually prefer the COS wines too.


But I think you guys are crazy to pay the current market for Ganevat and its only laziness that keeps me from selling my overnoy

I understand, but a lot of this price sensitivity is due to these bottles having been cheap before. I think Ganevat(whites especially) is genuinely fantastic. They are currently priced in the same range as good village burgundy which I don't think is entirely unreasonable. Its not like the price increases for Allemand.

I can just imagine how people that were buying burgundy in the 80s or early 90s must feel now.

#2409 Sneakeater

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Posted 24 February 2015 - 06:02 PM

That's the way I've been viewing Ganevat (whites especially), too.

Unlike Arianna's wines, they make sense to me as expensive wines. They were just underpriced before.
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#2410 Anthony Bonner

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Posted 24 February 2015 - 10:40 PM

I'll price him out for you when I'm in Tokyo next month.

"This is a battle of who blinks first, and we've cut off our eyelids"


#2411 splinky

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Posted 25 February 2015 - 04:39 AM

Riesling Kabinett, Gunderloch, "Jean-Baptiste" - 2012 at the Rainbow Room this evening. i think i need a case of this. what might be some nice pairings for this?


“One thing kids like is to be tricked. For instance, I was going to take my little nephew to Disneyland, but instead I drove him to an old burned-out warehouse. 'Oh, no!', I said, 'Disneyland burned down.' He cried and cried, but I think that deep down he thought it was a pretty good joke. I started to drive over to the real Disneyland, but it was getting pretty late.”
~Jack Handey

*proud descendant of cheese eating surrender monkeys*

 


#2412 Chambolle

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Posted 25 February 2015 - 02:15 PM

2007 Domaine Bachelet Cote de Nuits-Villages

Not a great year. But, in a way, a year like that is when a great producer like this can show their stuff in their lower-level wines. (As is well known, in lesser vintages, sometimes the lower-level wines get more of the better grapes, as producers select rigorously to preserve the quality of their senior cuvees.)

 

Do you think this may have been the case with the Cote de Nuits-Villages ?



#2413 joethefoodie

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Posted 25 February 2015 - 02:35 PM

Riesling Kabinett, Gunderloch, "Jean-Baptiste" - 2012 at the Rainbow Room this evening. i think i need a case of this. what might be some nice pairings for this?

A giant bratwurst?



#2414 Sneakeater

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Posted 25 February 2015 - 02:41 PM

Pork chops or roast. East Asian food. Indian food. Chicken or turkey or Guinea hen. Scallops. White fish. Sushi. Corn.
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#2415 Sneakeater

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Posted 25 February 2015 - 03:19 PM

Fruity sauces. Salty sauces. Spicy sauces.
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