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#3946 voyager

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 10:50 PM

 

Except champagne.

Which reminds me: I can find the authentic tiny brown shrimp in dried form in Chinatown. I suppose I'd need to soak them a long time. Anyone worked with Chinese dried shrimp?

Yeah - they're pretty darn salty, if memory serves me right.  And a little weird.  Might be soaked like you do salt cod - a few changes of water.

 

Seriously dislike.   Or perhaps more truthfully, seriously don't understand.    Desalinate, yes.   Or maybe just use an anchovy and call it good.


<p>A tavola non s'invecchia.

#3947 AaronS

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 02:24 AM

I've seen dried shrimp used in things like curry pastes in se asian cookbooks, I doubt soaking them will give you a good result.

#3948 Sneakeater

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 03:05 AM

Now that spiced potted shrimp used as a pasta sauce, over spaghetti.  Seared/sautéed Tuscan kale on the side.

 

Boy did I have a promising pairing for this.

 

Corneilissen MunJebel # 5

 

Two questions here:  (1) Can Corneillisen wines age?  (2) Can orange wines age?

 

Happily, this one did (very carefully stored, of course).  There's still tons of acid here, make no mistake.  But the fruit and the minerals have made better friends; although the minerals still predominate, the fruit blends in with them.  Other than all that acid, there are few weird flavors poking around in the background (or the foreground, for that matter).  This is a good, albeit "interesting", wine -- and it was just great with the food.

 

My hope was to leave half a bottle to drink with the remainder of the potted shrimp in a day or so, this last time on the traditional toast again.  I'm enjoying this wine enough that this hope is unlikely to be realized.


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#3949 Sneakeater

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 03:07 AM

For the last few years, I've shied away from the "weird", extremely non-interventionist wines of Corneilissen and Abe Schoener.  Lately, though, I've been returning to them.  And I have to say I've been remembering what I found appealing about them in the first place.


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#3950 Sneakeater

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 03:10 AM

I mean, what's interesting is that you really do taste fruit here -- something this wine was never noted for in its salad days.

 

I think this is an example of a wine's putting on dimensions with age -- which is not what you'd necessarily expect a wine like this to do.


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#3951 Sneakeater

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 03:59 AM

BTW, I bow to Wingding for finding a good Aglianico for less than $15.  I find the prices to be creeping up and up.


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#3952 Sneakeater

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 04:10 AM

OK, I'll stop now, but . . . .

 

This MunJebel is a prime example of a wine you'd expect to suck without food.  But I'm having no problem pouring successive glasses to drink long after my food is gone.  At this extended age (for a wine like this) this is just good.


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#3953 joethefoodie

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 12:55 PM

I've seen dried shrimp used in things like curry pastes in se asian cookbooks, I doubt soaking them will give you a good result.

 

Yes - the very small ones are often ground up into a powder for some Chinese dishes. But I've also seen them sprinkled onto rice rolls and in some soups. And eaten whole, as snacks. 



#3954 Sneakeater

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Posted 16 March 2017 - 04:50 AM

Some rabbit wrapped in bacon left over from a recent restaurant meal.  In a sagey cream sauce, over anneloni (better pasta through physics!).  Sautéed Tuscan kale along with spinach also left over from the restaurant meal on the side.

 

I knew I wanted with this something (a) Italian, (b) genetically related to Syrah, but (c ) lighter.

 

2010 Foradori Teroldego

 

What is there to say about this celebrated wine?  That it went perfectly with this food, with its low tannins, high acid, and unique fruit-n-spice?  That while it's consistently good, in good vintages like 2010 it's even better?  That Elisabetta Foradori is one of the great winemakers in the world?  That her cheaper cuvée is her better one?

 

We can say all those things.  Bottoms up!


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#3955 Sneakeater

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 04:15 AM

The end of this batch of potted shrimp.  The end of the doggie-bagged string beans in pesto (thanks, D!).  Not the end of the German potato salad.

 

A repetitious pairing.

 

Bodegas Guiterrez Colosia Fino Sherry "Amerigo Vespucci"

 

A very attractive Fino.  Has the seaside tang of a Manzanilla, almost.  Very yeasty (not that there's anything wrong with that).  Less nutty than some -- and maybe more olivey.

 

Yeah, very attractive.


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#3956 prasantrin

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 06:27 PM

I've seen dried shrimp used in things like curry pastes in se asian cookbooks, I doubt soaking them will give you a good result.

Yeah, use them for making curry paste or if you're feeling rich, xo sauce. I've seen it used in some Chinese dishes, like as a last minute addition to stir fried gailan (thrown in at the end, just a little before plating).

They're the reason I can't eat Thai curries anymore. They are almost always included in commercial pastes, even if not listed in the ingredients.

#3957 wingding

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 09:02 PM

Some rabbit wrapped in bacon left over from a recent restaurant meal.  In a sagey cream sauce, over anneloni (better pasta through physics!).  Sautéed Tuscan kale along with spinach also left over from the restaurant meal on the side.

 

I knew I wanted with this something (a) Italian, (b) genetically related to Syrah, but (c ) lighter.

 

2010 Foradori Teroldego

 

What is there to say about this celebrated wine?  That it went perfectly with this food, with its low tannins, high acid, and unique fruit-n-spice?  That while it's consistently good, in good vintages like 2010 it's even better?  That Elisabetta Foradori is one of the great winemakers in the world?  That her cheaper cuvée is her better one?

 

We can say all those things.  Bottoms up!

The cheaper red is def. better. Love the Fontanasanta,but it has gotten too expensive...


G*d is in the details...

#3958 wingding

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 08:02 PM

More love for ingredienti Italiani....Montoli beans with my favorite Sicilian olive oil;Virage Polifemo,made from Tonda Iblei olives from the Monte Iblei. Lamb and tomato ragu with anchovies...and a deep dark blend from Umbria;Fongoli Montefalco Rosso. Fennel,olive and blood orange salad...


G*d is in the details...

#3959 Sneakeater

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Posted 24 March 2017 - 04:14 AM

Montreal steak.  With fried potatoes and collard greens.

 

With a dish like that, you could either go big or go small.  Being a Modern Wine Drinker, I went small.

 

2015 Brendan Tracey Wah-Wah Rouge

 

A textbook natural wine complements this meal, because the fizz and the acid cut through the fat and stand up to the smoked-meat spice.  Moreover, this particular one has 25% Cot (or Malbec) in it to complement the beef -- the rest being that light Loire grape, Grolleau, to go along with the spice.

 

This is a good wine of its type.  You can taste the fruit, along with the natural stuff that goes so well with steak seasoned like smoked meat.  It would be good with a burger, too (note to self).  It's not as light as it first seems like it's going to be.  (That's a good thing.)

 

Very useful.


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