Jump to content


Photo

The Rest of Us


  • Please log in to reply
5380 replies to this topic

#5131 Wilfrid

Wilfrid

    Advanced Member

  • Admin
  • PipPipPip
  • 86,539 posts

Posted 19 July 2019 - 09:10 PM

I want butifarra.



#5132 Sneakeater

Sneakeater

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 64,525 posts

Posted 19 July 2019 - 09:25 PM

Spanish AND Portuguese!
Bar Loser

MF Old

#5133 Orik

Orik

    Advanced Member

  • Technocrat
  • PipPipPip
  • 22,107 posts

Posted 19 July 2019 - 09:39 PM

Morcilla Andaluza is a very good, no nonsense version, but the truth is everything goes well with La Bota 30


sandwiches that are large and filling and do not contain tuna or prawns

#5134 Sneakeater

Sneakeater

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 64,525 posts

Posted 19 July 2019 - 10:37 PM

It’s crazy. It just LOVES food.
Bar Loser

MF Old

#5135 Sneakeater

Sneakeater

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 64,525 posts

Posted 22 July 2019 - 02:48 AM

Fried flounder.  As I've said before, for all the childhood memories this fish invokes for me, I might as well call it madeleinefish.  With leftover housemade down-and-dirty faux sauce gribiche.  Steamed sugar snaps on the side.

 

The reason I ate fried flounder so much as a child is that my mother's mother was Austrian -- and Austrians love their fried whitefish.

 

So while they wouldn't be drinking it with flounder, I opened a bottle of a very localized wine whose local drinkers surely have it with fried whitefish all the time.

 

2016 Jutta Ambrositsch Gemischter Satz "Satellit"

 

I love these Viennese (usually white) field blends beyond all reason.  And Jutta Abrositsch is the best current maker (at least if you tend toward natural wines).  This is everything one of these wines should be:  fresh, crisp, lip-smackingly delicious.  (No complexity whatsoever -- a summer quaffer par excellence.)

 

And as good with fried flounder (and steamed sugar snaps, for that matter) as could be.


Bar Loser

MF Old

#5136 Sneakeater

Sneakeater

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 64,525 posts

Posted 23 July 2019 - 03:51 AM

It would be idle to pretend that aged ribeye and Barolo is a "The Rest of Us" dinner.  But I couldn't find the general elitist wine-with-dinner thread and didn't feel like starting a new one.  So sue me.  (Maybe we can call this entry "The Rest of Us Ballers".)

 

I reverse-seared the steak.  This is a good way to cook steak for sure -- although I think I probably didn't sear it enough.  I cooked the steak a little beyond medium rare because I was eating it with a very old wine (with depleted tannins), and I didn't want the wine to be overpowered by a rare steak with a lot of unrendered fat.

 

I had a tiny bit of housemade Perpetual Chimichurri with the steak (again, wanted to avoid overpowering the wine with too much chimichurri:  save that for an overripe Argentine Malbec) and some seared garlic scapes (they were seared enough).  On the side, a Sicilianish cauliflower/spinach/tomato semi-hemi-demi-stew I sort of made up.

 

I certainly didn't make up the pairing of ribeye steak and Barolo.  But clichés are often clichés for a reason.

 

1964 Marcarini Barolo

 

This is from before there was a Trad v. Modern Barolo controversy, cuz they hadn't yet invented Modern.  There's no vineyard designation, because nobody made single-vineyard Barolos back then.

 

Marcarini Barolos have a great sentimental pull for me, because the very first Barolo I ever drank was a Marcarini (from a later vintage than this one:   one of the good early '70s vintages, '70 or '71).  Of course, back in the mid-'80s, that wine wasn't as majestically old as this one is now.

 

1964 was a big, somewhat hard (but great) vintage.  So it has all the ingredients for successful aging.  Now I'm not going to say that this wine is as fresh, as vibrant, as it must have been in, say, 1976.  What I'm going to say is that it provides a very delicious, satisfying, even moving experience, its frailty being what makes it moving.  Which is not to say there isn't any fruit.  There's lots of it -- but in that old-wine way, it's melded with the secondary flavors, the famous Barolo tar and roses (one of those wine clichés that, when you drink the wine, turn out to be absolutely on point), and let's not forget truffles and mushrooms.  So what you get is a single (albeit long-lasting) integrated blast of the Alpine foothills -- tinged with nostalgia.

 

I should have played Meet the Beatles while I drank this.  Or called up my (formerly) little brother and reminisced about when he was four (he was a lot cuter then).  But really, the wine was enough.


Bar Loser

MF Old

#5137 Sneakeater

Sneakeater

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 64,525 posts

Posted 23 July 2019 - 03:53 AM

And wow this is another wine you can just taste opening up as time passes.  I gave it a couple of hours' decant -- but it should have been more.


Bar Loser

MF Old

#5138 Sneakeater

Sneakeater

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 64,525 posts

Posted 23 July 2019 - 04:17 AM

There's no vineyard designation, because nobody made single-vineyard Barolos back then.


Actually, tiny tiny print on the label -- nobody old enough to have this wine could read it without pain -- specifies Brunate. But the print is so tiny it comes across as a formality rather than a selling point.


Bar Loser

MF Old

#5139 Sneakeater

Sneakeater

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 64,525 posts

Posted 23 July 2019 - 04:27 AM

Oh, I see that in 2016, Eric Asimov called this wine "a bit strident".  I can live with it.


Bar Loser

MF Old

#5140 Wilfrid

Wilfrid

    Advanced Member

  • Admin
  • PipPipPip
  • 86,539 posts

Posted 23 July 2019 - 10:58 PM

You are making me relive the 1954 Rioja I opened for my birthday, with which I too did not play any Beatles. Maybe I should have given it some Elvis. It opens and opens, but you know it’s going to expire so you drink it.

#5141 Sneakeater

Sneakeater

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 64,525 posts

Posted 23 July 2019 - 11:23 PM

Yeah, that's it exactly.


Bar Loser

MF Old

#5142 Sneakeater

Sneakeater

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 64,525 posts

Posted 24 July 2019 - 03:17 AM

More spigarello soup.

 

Then, huevos rotos con patatas y chistorra.  This was unbelievably good, but I can see how I fucked it up in one respect.  Fortunately, there's more chistorra.

 

La Bota 30 de Manzanilla Pasada "Capataz Rivas"

 

This was even better with this than with the chorizo and lentils.  I mean, eggs, right?

 

Unfortunately, it's gone now (or about to be).  The pairing for the next batch won't be as perfect, I predict.


Bar Loser

MF Old

#5143 Sneakeater

Sneakeater

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 64,525 posts

Posted 27 July 2019 - 05:30 AM

I took the leftovers of the cauliflower/spinach stew I had as a side dish a few nights ago (other ingredients included tomatoes, alliums, raisins, pine nuts, and chili peppers, to give you an idea of what it was like) and used it as a Sicilianish pasta topping.  I added some bottarga, cuz why wouldn't I? (And bread crumbs, of course -- but this is getting MUCH too boring.)  I put it on gigli pasta, cuz that's my fave.

 

FIRST COURSE:  Head cheese (Morscher's) with baguette and coarse mustard, and some radishes.  I can't speak for Orik or Wilf, but I think this Morscher's natural head cheese is quite good (especially for something that cost almost nothing that I can eat at home whenever I want).  I feel bad for Seth Gordon's cat for having to forgo it.

 

(This coursing stuff really works.  Or would work, had I remembered to turn on the burner under the pasta water as I ate the head cheese.)

 

2017 Eduardo Torres Acosta Versante Nord Uve Bianche

 

Now that Arianna Occhipinti has priced herself out of the reasonable-wine range, the thing to do is turn to her boyfriend.  He's from Tenerife, and came to Sicily initially as Arianna's intern.  (You know how things go.)  Now he grows his own grapes on Mount Etna, and vinifies them in Arianna's facility.

 

This is a blend of four Sicilian grapes I've never (knowingly) heard of (OK:  Minella, Carricante, Cataratto, and Albanello -- you all know them like the backs of your hands, right?).  It's luscious.  Very tart fruit at start, very very herbaceous follow-up.  You just WANT to drink this.  It's like the definition of "moreish".


Bar Loser

MF Old

#5144 Sneakeater

Sneakeater

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 64,525 posts

Posted 27 July 2019 - 05:38 AM

Now that I think of it, I think I've heard of Carricante.


Bar Loser

MF Old

#5145 Sneakeater

Sneakeater

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 64,525 posts

Posted 30 July 2019 - 05:59 AM

In my experience, Roberta's serves right up to its midnight closing time. But not tonight. My very hungry pizza-loving date and I arrived from a concert that had run overtime at 11:49, and Roberta's was done in the dining room. They were still doing takeout from the new takeout counter down the street. I wanted to find another restaurant that was open, but my very hungry pizza-loving date insisted on taking out a pie back to my apartment.

So, Roberta's Big Stinky pie, with some purslane I sautéed with lots of lemon zest. (The pizza was NOT better for its ride to GAP.)

2012 Brovia Barbera d'Alba "Ciaböt del Fi"

This is a really fab Barbera. Strong cherry lead-off, then a good lasting finish of herbs and minerals.

We finished the bottle with dessert.
Bar Loser

MF Old