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Storing Digital Photos


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#31 mitchells

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 06:20 PM

Do Wilf's dark photos take up less space?



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#32 Lex

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 06:30 PM

Do Wilf's dark photos take up less space?

 
He prefers to call it photographie noir.


"I don't understand what's wrong with thinking of correlation as a pricing convention the way one thinks of Black-Scholes vol. I mean, vol curves aren't "real" anyway, but nobody uses local vol models to price vanilla options." - Taion
 
"But this is blatant ultracrepidarianism on my part." - Taion

I have a dream of a multiplicity of pastramis.

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#33 taion

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 08:58 PM

I'm saying that if you're storing thousands or tens of thousands of JPEGs, I'd recommend using something equivalent to Dropbox over storing external HDDs in safe deposit boxes, as your offsite backup solution.


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#34 Rail Paul

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 09:30 PM

Thanks for all the additions to Abby's thread. The Shutterfly plus storage drives method works well for us because we can make sharing easy. That's a big consideration, since we have several people dipping into the archive.

I also have more than a thousand boxes of color slides which I need to scan and store after I get the current project done.
Dreams come in all sizes, shapes, and colors.

#35 Lex

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 09:48 PM

I also have more than a thousand boxes of color slides which I need to scan and store after I get the current project done.


That sounds like a huge job. I'll bet there are places where you could get someone to scan them for you. The down side of that is the slides could get lost. Maybe hire a high school kid on summer vacation and do it in house.
"I don't understand what's wrong with thinking of correlation as a pricing convention the way one thinks of Black-Scholes vol. I mean, vol curves aren't "real" anyway, but nobody uses local vol models to price vanilla options." - Taion
 
"But this is blatant ultracrepidarianism on my part." - Taion

I have a dream of a multiplicity of pastramis.

"once the penis came out, there was discussions as to why we didn't order the testicles" - Daniel describing a meal in China

#36 Rail Paul

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 11:01 PM

 

I also have more than a thousand boxes of color slides which I need to scan and store after I get the current project done.


That sounds like a huge job. I'll bet there are places where you could get someone to scan them for you. The down side of that is the slides could get lost. Maybe hire a high school kid on summer vacation and do it in house.

 

 

 

Yes, I've considered both options.  I'm leaning toward a two part solution.  based on an informal test run of a few 36 slide boxes, I think about 1/3 can be discarded right away.  Use my slide projector to review the slides, a few boxes at a time. Discard the culls, and then scan the remainder.  I'll probably spring for a better slide scanner than the  Epson V90 which I currently have. Maybe something which has an auto-feed device, so I can remove a few steps.


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#37 taion

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Posted 10 May 2017 - 04:01 PM

In general film labs can do this sort of scanning for you, and they'll have like Noritsu or Frontier minilab scanners that will be better than home scanners.

 

They charge through the nose for this sort of thing, though – especially the better film labs. Is it worth it? Probably not – especially the pricier options, since their main customer base consists of wedding and portrait photogs that shoot print film, where there's a bit more subjective judgment involved on the part of the operator, and there's a pretty large spread on scan quality (though this includes processing) across different labs.

 

The same variability probably won't show up for scanning slides.


I didn't tip at Per Se either.