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#451 voyager

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Posted 22 March 2018 - 03:24 PM

Which style formula and method do you use and recommend?


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#452 Anthony Bonner

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Posted 22 March 2018 - 03:43 PM

 Shocked you'd think we were anything but fashionable.


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#453 Orik

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Posted 22 March 2018 - 03:51 PM

I make a homeopathic loaf with 10000000000% hydration, and fold it like z^2+c. 

 

But when I bake (which like AB I'm less likely to with Bageri, Bakeri, Bien Cuit, etc. available) it's usually 50% rye (with the other half usually bread flour, occasionally some spelt although that usually turns out pretty flat), 65%-ish hydration sourdough, or if it's focaccia and such then I use hoshino yeast and take maybe 2 days in the vegetable drawer to ferment. 


sandwiches that are large and filling and do not contain tuna or prawns

#454 joethefoodie

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Posted 22 March 2018 - 04:09 PM

I try to only buy bread from places with names that start with a "B."  Although an "M" and a "P" work as well.

 

I am trying a first experiment with the new oven, baking steel, and fairly high hydration, no-knead (no fold, either), yeasted flat bread - via Lahey's pizza bianca recipe.  After its initial 12-hour ferment, it looks good...and now it's folded, shaped, and in the fridge.

 

27085528658_b107d5dedc_z.jpg



#455 bloviatrix

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Posted 23 March 2018 - 12:23 AM

I've been finding that when I use the Lahey method my loaves turn out to be as dense as hockey pucks.


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#456 voyager

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Posted 23 March 2018 - 12:32 AM

I've been finding that when I use the Lahey method my loaves turn out to be as dense as hockey pucks.


No, no, no!!! Not my experience. I use the original formula, adjust flours and additives (seeds, nuts, dried fruits, seaweed), let rise overnight, sometimes adjust and extend second rise. I judge when it is ready to bake by its shape and bounce.

These loaves are better than I can locally at $6 plus.


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#457 joethefoodie

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Posted 23 March 2018 - 03:06 PM

So my pizza bianca, hewing to the Lahey method, wasn't as good as the ones we ate daily in Rome (big surprise).

 

The surprise was that it wasn't as good as other attempts I myself have made. Too bad I never write stuff down - like the formula I followed when I made some delicious ones.



#458 voyager

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Posted 23 March 2018 - 03:26 PM

Interesting.    Am sorry since I've been waiting to read your results.      

 

Recently I came across this Focaccia video.    (The way I cook:) I would use the no-knead recipe up through the first rise, turn out, stretch, adding just enough flour to make it workable and proceed with her method of shaping.    This is theoretical and I haven't tried it yet.   Will try to soon,

 


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#459 joethefoodie

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Posted 23 March 2018 - 03:44 PM

Focaccia is so different from pizza bianca though.

The best focaccia Ive made was following a recipe in the Il Fornaio bread book. Uses a biga. Always came out great.

#460 Orik

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Posted 23 March 2018 - 04:01 PM

So my pizza bianca, hewing to the Lahey method, wasn't as good as the ones we ate daily in Rome (big surprise).

 

The surprise was that it wasn't as good as other attempts I myself have made. Too bad I never write stuff down - like the formula I followed when I made some delicious ones.

 

Doesn't the Italian recipe call for brewer's yeast and 00 flour? 


sandwiches that are large and filling and do not contain tuna or prawns

#461 joethefoodie

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Posted 23 March 2018 - 05:31 PM

I don't know if there's a singular Italian recipe, but all the books (including a few specific Roman cookbooks) I've referred to call for active dry yeast, and bread and/or a/p flour.



#462 Suzanne F

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Posted 23 March 2018 - 06:38 PM

I don't know if there's a singular Italian recipe, but all the books (including a few specific Roman cookbooks) I've referred to call for active dry yeast, and bread and/or a/p flour.

 

Are those cookbooks that have been Americanized by the publisher? Or actual Roman cookbooks, in Italian? I ask because Americanizations sometimes change ingredients from those in the original recipe to something more easily obtained in the US. Which is not to say that the recipes are retested; afaik, only Fred Plotkin :wub: tests his recipes both ways.


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#463 Sneakeater

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Posted 23 March 2018 - 06:40 PM

Wouldn't an Italian cookbook just say something like, "make a pizza bianca"?


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#464 voyager

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Posted 23 March 2018 - 07:37 PM

The (or one) problem with trying to nail down local recipes like this one is that even within the community there are as many "real" recipes as there are pizza makers.   Each guaranteed to the the Holy Grail.    Travel a hundred km and the recipes get more varied while the claims for authenticity are as vehement,  

 

You just find a version that meets your expectations and call it good. 


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#465 Orik

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Posted 23 March 2018 - 11:32 PM

Wouldn't an Italian cookbook just say something like, "make a pizza bianca"?


That's Indian.
sandwiches that are large and filling and do not contain tuna or prawns