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#466 joethefoodie

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Posted 24 March 2018 - 12:56 PM

The (or one) problem with trying to nail down local recipes like this one is that even within the community there are as many "real" recipes as there are pizza makers.   Each guaranteed to the the Holy Grail.    Travel a hundred km and the recipes get more varied while the claims for authenticity are as vehement,  

 

You just find a version that meets your expectations and call it good. 

Not that there are only 2 or 3 places making what many consider the iconic pizza bianca of Rome (and 100km away, they're probably not making pizza bianca), but most people with knowledge of that city's dining situation often point you to:

 

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Forno Campo de' Fiori, or...

 

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Antico Forno Roscioli, where your pizza bianca (on the right) can be stuffed with any sort of deliciousness you desire (in this case, mortadella), and is eaten outside on whatever table or upside down barrel you can find.



#467 joethefoodie

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Posted 24 March 2018 - 12:59 PM

Kenji's recipe is probably pretty good.



#468 Orik

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Posted 24 March 2018 - 01:13 PM

 

Wouldn't an Italian cookbook just say something like, "make a pizza bianca"?


That's Indian.

 

 

The Italian would say "buy pizza bianca" 


sandwiches that are large and filling and do not contain tuna or prawns

#469 Orik

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Posted 24 March 2018 - 01:15 PM

Kenji's recipe is probably pretty good.

 

I doubt it.

 

Turns out I remembered correctly about the yeast:

 

http://www.identitag...icetta.html?p=0


sandwiches that are large and filling and do not contain tuna or prawns

#470 joethefoodie

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Posted 24 March 2018 - 02:48 PM

I'm no chemist, but...

 

"Remember that brewer's yeast and baking yeast are the same strain of yeast fungi, but they grow at different speeds. ... You will require less of the dry active yeast, which is made for a rapid one-rise recipe..."



#471 joethefoodie

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Posted 24 March 2018 - 02:51 PM

Whereas the addition of malt is interesting, as the Lahey recipe (and any number of others) calls for sugar.  And a number of them call for milk, too.

 

But - I'm not in Rome, and I'm baking in a home oven, which obviously that recipe (from Roscioli, thanks by the way) has been converted to work in - as pizza bianca is generally baked in something like 6' slabs, right on the oven floor.



#472 Orik

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Posted 24 March 2018 - 04:19 PM

I'm no chemist, but...

 

"Remember that brewer's yeast and baking yeast are the same strain of yeast fungi, but they grow at different speeds. ... You will require less of the dry active yeast, which is made for a rapid one-rise recipe..."

 

The same strain but the bubbles don't end up looking the same because of the rate of fermentation. 

 

And yes, the reason why it's not really a great home baked good is that it's thin and cooked in those slabs at roscioli and that other place. (it's like I made pita once but then figured I can only fit one at a time on the stone, which makes it a PITA)

 

Focaccia is a bit more reasonable due to thickness. 


sandwiches that are large and filling and do not contain tuna or prawns

#473 joethefoodie

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Posted 24 March 2018 - 05:58 PM

Yes - we agree?!

 

I've ordered that Roscioli book English version - interested to see if the recipe is the same.

 

And I've had moderate success in the past -  but as I mentioned above, don't remember what recipe/method used - or perhaps it was a mix of a number of recipes, and baked on parchment on a stone, then moved directly to stone.

 

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#474 Suzanne F

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Posted 24 March 2018 - 06:09 PM

Love that it looks like a tongue is sticking out.


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#475 joethefoodie

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Posted 04 April 2018 - 11:58 AM

Another batch of dough, rested for 48 hours in fridge after initial fermentation, but baked in the steam oven...

 

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#476 voyager

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Posted 04 April 2018 - 02:00 PM

Very nice!


It's not my circus,

not my monkeys.


#477 voyager

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Posted 06 April 2018 - 07:43 PM

We cancelled a little celebratory dinner party scheduled for tonight because of threatened flooding, not wanting to put guests in harm's way.   But bread was set.   One plain country loaf and one raisin, intended for foie gras and cheese courses.    

 

So what can you do?   Have a little bread and butter while it's warm.

 

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(Foie gras shelved for a sunnier day.)


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#478 StephanieL

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Posted 16 April 2018 - 07:56 PM

For a brunch we went to yesterday, N made an enormous (belated) Easter bread, using a mixture of bread flour and KAF white whole wheat flour.  A little bit of spice went into the bread, along with rum-soaked dried fruit, but not much sugar, because running down the middle of the bread was (firm) rum custard, made with Bird's custard powder.  Cinnamon-orange glaze on top.


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#479 joethefoodie

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Posted 25 October 2018 - 06:24 PM

Significant Eater is no fan of the lowly banana.  And certainly not when they look like this...

 

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But that's how I like them when I'm making one of these...

 

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It's my standard, slightly bastardize banana bread recipe from Nick Malgieri's How to Bake

 

I have a fondness for Nick, as he was my instructor for pastry and baking back at the old Peter Kump's NY Cooking School, my alma mater 



#480 bloviatrix

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Posted 26 December 2018 - 01:36 AM

Last year a friend served us an amazing bread from Orwashers that was studded with cranberries, raisins and pistachios and redolent of orange zest. Shortly thereafter I discovered the recipe and have been wanting to try it. I finally had the time yesterday and I got to use the bread proofing setting on my oven! The recipe produces 4 loaves, so i baked off two and the other two are shaped and in the freezer. I've got to say, it's pretty damn good.


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