Jump to content


Photo

Costco Rotisserie Chicken


  • Please log in to reply
113 replies to this topic

#46 hollywood

hollywood

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 22,946 posts

Posted 22 September 2010 - 07:30 PM

Posted Image

I think it's gonna take a lot more than that. :P

I got that gin in my system
Somebody's gon' be my victim.

 

Big Freedia


#47 flyfish

flyfish

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 9,771 posts

Posted 22 September 2010 - 07:57 PM

I don't think it's dangerous or anything, just really curious about the dynamics of $6 eggs vs chicken that's minutes away from being shipped off to Mexican KFC.

Is there any evidence supporting your suggestion that Costco has a policy of roasting close-to-expiry chicken? Chickens seem to, er, fly out of our Costco. I would be very surprised if they had enough old ones kicking around to roast.

I'll buy you a 24 pack of beer if that's not how it's done.

(Would have to be Canadian beer... because you know we say that American beer is like making love in a canoe)

Is that the usual grocery store practice (to roast then when near the expiry date) or just your feeling about Costco?
I used to be eye candy but now Im more like eye pickle"
Neil Innes

Your father is going deaf. I cant hear a word he says!
My mom

I hope to set an example, you know, for children and stuff."
Captain Hammer

#48 Rail Paul

Rail Paul

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 18,600 posts

Posted 22 September 2010 - 08:02 PM

Costco has enormous pull in a lot of markets, so I doubt chicken would be much different.

They're the largest seller of fine Champagne in the US, by a healthy margin. They move shiploads of wine, often with razor thin margins.

When Costco received wine shippers and importers in 2009, Alois Lageder flew from Italy to Seattle for the presentation. I suspect they could get a flock of Tysons, Perdues, Pilgrims, etc to show up when they ask for proposals on chicken.

“Jazz musicians just get better and better as the years go by. I think chefs are the same way. You know who you are.”

 

...Jonathan Waxman


#49 Anthony Bonner

Anthony Bonner

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 9,425 posts

Posted 22 September 2010 - 08:09 PM

(Would have to be Canadian beer... because you know we say that American beer is like making love in a canoe)


I know this one - the canoe tips
Why not mayo?

#50 Orik

Orik

    Advanced Member

  • Technocrat
  • PipPipPip
  • 16,781 posts

Posted 23 September 2010 - 02:18 PM

Is that the usual grocery store practice (to roast then when near the expiry date) or just your feeling about Costco?



Yes, it is common practice to divert chicken that's somehow unappealing towards processed or "spiced" chicken products, Costco isn't special this way.

My gut feeling was that Costco isn't really running on "razor thin" margins here (why would they?), and that they're not selling you the best chicken in the world for that price but I was curious about the statements about how great it was and found the answer in salt, sugar, msg, and water. Based on the list of additives and the percentage of added water (seems very high even compared to crappy chicken brands that usually manage to add 15% or so) I'd say this is now more than a gut feeling. I don't know that much about the chicken market but an analogy from the fish and seafood industry would be with the lowest grade frozen seafood from China/Thailand that's meant do be used in fried fish sticks and such - great moisture retention, not much flavor, and whatever flavor there is gets supressed by spices, batter, and oil.

Unless Costco is really trying to minimize its profits, I would think this is dyed, bleached chicken from one of the brands that score very low on taste tests (Perdue? Tyson?) that's marketed to costco for the express purpose of selling as spiced/rotisserie chicken - it's not that costco is run like a grocery store where the manager decides to cook up old merchandise, but rather that it buys chicken that's already designated to be sold fully cooked, just as KFC or other fried chicken chains might do.
I never said that

#51 Stone

Stone

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 14,442 posts

Posted 23 September 2010 - 02:56 PM

I've checked the nutrition label on-line and don't see anything about msg added. According to a Yelp post:

Ingredients: whole chicken,water,salt,sodium phosphated,modified food starch, sugar,carrageenan,soy lecithin,flavorings and xanthan gum.
"No Preservatives,MSG, Gluten, Artificial Flavors or colors." Yep, thats from the label.


I also haven't seen anything to suggest that the .5 g sugar and 460 mg sodium per 3 oz is out of line for any prepared chicken.

#52 Orik

Orik

    Advanced Member

  • Technocrat
  • PipPipPip
  • 16,781 posts

Posted 23 September 2010 - 02:59 PM

You're right, AB suggested that the modified food starch was MSG, possibly it's yet another moisture retention aid.

Isn't sodium phosphate a preservative?

eta: WalMart rotisserie chicken has no sugar (that is less than 0.5g / 3oz), but more salt and more fat, as they don't reach the same sort of water retention. I think it's Tyson's, so Costco's probably Perdue :)
I never said that

#53 flyfish

flyfish

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 9,771 posts

Posted 23 September 2010 - 03:05 PM

it's not that costco is run like a grocery store where the manager decides to cook up old merchandise, but rather that it buys chicken that's already designated to be sold fully cooked, just as KFC or other fried chicken chains might do.

Ah, I may be dim but I'm slow. That was the point I was missing - thanks!
I used to be eye candy but now Im more like eye pickle"
Neil Innes

Your father is going deaf. I cant hear a word he says!
My mom

I hope to set an example, you know, for children and stuff."
Captain Hammer

#54 Anthony Bonner

Anthony Bonner

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 9,425 posts

Posted 23 September 2010 - 03:10 PM

You're right, AB suggested that the modified food starch was MSG, possibly it's yet another moisture retention aid.

Isn't sodium phosphate a preservative?

eta: WalMart rotisserie chicken has no sugar (that is less than 0.5g / 3oz), but more salt and more fat, as they don't reach the same sort of water retention. I think it's Tyson's, so Costco's probably Perdue :)

could be but modified food starch is such a vague term - it could be anything from from a sweetener, to a flavoring, to a thickener. Depends what enzyme you are using to modify the corn starch. Technically modified food starch where you've hydrolyzed the starch into some glutamate rich compound might not be MSG, but it is functionally the same thing. Probably metabolically as well.
I would think the food gums are the main moisture retention aids.

ETA: yes sodium phosphate is a preservative
Why not mayo?

#55 Stone

Stone

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 14,442 posts

Posted 23 September 2010 - 03:13 PM

I still don't understand what you've got against moist chicken, which I assume is what you mean by "water retention aid." Would it be better if the "water retention" was the result of brining per a recipe in the Zuni Cookbook? If an injected, food starched, water-retained chicken tastes good, who cares why? Last I heard, water is good for us, which explaines why almost every woman in Manhattan is carrying a bottle of it right now.

And I'm not sure how you know how much water Walmart's chicken retains, since I'm guessing you've never seen one. But that's just a guess.

#56 Suzanne F

Suzanne F

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 15,908 posts

Posted 23 September 2010 - 03:14 PM

That bothered me when AB said it. Modified food starch is not the same as MSG. MSG is free glutamic acid; modified starch is just that: natural starch that has been processed to change its properties. Could be for texture or moisture retention.

I try never to dine with other people. It just makes things so much easier. -- Anthony Bonner, March 28, 2014

 

notorious stickler -- NY Times
deeply annoying and nitpicking -- Molly O'Neill, One Big Table


#57 Anthony Bonner

Anthony Bonner

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 9,425 posts

Posted 23 September 2010 - 03:18 PM

That bothered me when AB said it. Modified food starch is not the same as MSG. MSG is free glutamic acid; modified starch is just that: natural starch that has been processed to change its properties. Could be for texture or moisture retention.

that is one variant of modified food starch yes, but it is also something that can be found on a long list of euphimisms for MSG.

Here is a link: http://www.truthinla....org/nomsg.html

BTW - I have absolutely no problem with glutamate as a flavor enhancer. I fucking love umami.
Why not mayo?

#58 Orik

Orik

    Advanced Member

  • Technocrat
  • PipPipPip
  • 16,781 posts

Posted 23 September 2010 - 03:21 PM

I still don't understand what you've got against moist chicken



Nothing. In fact I think it'd be best if there was no chicken in there at all, just water and spices!

And I'm not sure how you know how much water Walmart's chicken retains, since I'm guessing you've never seen one. But that's just a guess.



What's not fat, not protein, and not carbs?
I never said that

#59 Stone

Stone

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 14,442 posts

Posted 23 September 2010 - 03:24 PM

But it tastes good. That's what the folks at the beginning of the thread say. If the added water merely bulked up the chicken for appearances while diluting the flavor, I'd agree with the criticism. Am I wrong that the purpose of brining meats is to get water and sodium into the meat so that when moisture is inevitably lost during cooking there still remains enough for a moist finished product? Isn't brining one of the great foodie secrets, now that "sealing in the juices" has been debunked?

#60 Anthony Bonner

Anthony Bonner

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 9,425 posts

Posted 23 September 2010 - 03:24 PM


And I'm not sure how you know how much water Walmart's chicken retains, since I'm guessing you've never seen one. But that's just a guess.



What's not fat, not protein, and not carbs?

phlogiston
Why not mayo?