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Edi & the Wolf


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#16 Sneakeater

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Posted 05 January 2011 - 09:55 PM

You know, I suppose it's worth mentioning that food was extremely slow in coming out of the kitchen.
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#17 Wilfrid

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Posted 06 January 2011 - 08:09 PM

I have walked by the place, and seeing the gigantic sign - completely inappropriate for the block - went to take a look. No menus in the windows, no indication of what cuisine it serves, just a huge empty room.

Not going to get much walk-in custom this way.

Edi & The Wolf:

Sounds like we are all pretty much agreed on the menu. Light and delicate is not what the look of the place says. I also have to say I didn't like their cucumber salad any better than one I can make.

#18 Sneakeater

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Posted 06 January 2011 - 08:21 PM

So you beat my aunt as well.
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#19 Sneakeater

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Posted 06 January 2011 - 08:22 PM

There's an advantage to having grown up in a family of bad cooks. I'm very easily impressed.
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#20 oakapple

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 06:19 PM

I dined there on Friday evening (blog post here). I loved both items I had, the pork belly (so light it could almost be called a salad) and the Wiener Schnitzel (a classic, but very well made).

The space seems almost like a deliberate over-reaction to the somewhat cold and aloof style of Seäsonal, and I write that as one who likes Seäsonal. If you didn't know the background, you would not think that the same two guys are behind both restaurants. (A friend who is in the industry told me she heard that they are going to close Seäsonal for a very brief make-over, to make the space warmer and more welcoming.)

I agree with Wilfrid that if you just walk by, you have no idea what kind of place it is. Of course, they wouldn't be the first ones to build a restaurant that is deliberately difficult to notice.
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#21 Wilfrid

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 07:07 PM

"Ample portion"? Not 'arf, mate. You got two schnitzels; I only got one. :o

#22 Daisy

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 07:11 PM

You need to start showing up at restaurants wearing your monocle.
Sardines aren't for sissies.---Frank Bruni
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The mistake one makes is to react to what people post rather than to what they mean.---Dr. Johnson
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#23 Anthony Bonner

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 07:18 PM

You need to start showing up at restaurants wearing your monocle.

don't forget the ascot and beret - tells the staff you mean business

(at stumptown @ the ace hotel over the hols - fedora + ascot + handlebar moustache on an employee)

"This is a battle of who blinks first, and we've cut off our eyelids"


#24 oakapple

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 07:39 PM

"Ample portion"? Not 'arf, mate. You got two schnitzels; I only got one. :o

It's not uncommon to see portion sizes adjusted in a restaurant's early days. The extra schnitzel made a difference, and I was out of there for $40 (before tip), which has to be reckoned a bargain these days.
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#25 The Princess

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 07:42 PM

I was in there with BF at 11:30pm last friday night and ordered Spaetzle and Raviolis plate. I like the ravioli with comes with nice bitter greens, roasted cauliflower and shaved parmesan cheese. The Spaetzle was hot and tasty, although the portions were so large that after a while I got a little bored. BF thought his beer, a dark stout, was nice but not earth shattering. The service was really friendly. The place was packed at midnight. Nothing we ate was food I couldn't make at home, but at 11;30Pm, I just want someone else to make it. It's definitely a place we will add for late night munchie food, and dessert cravings.

#26 Adrian

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Posted 31 January 2011 - 04:10 PM

Generally enjoyed a meal here on Thursday night. Absolutely love the look of the place - the wood, the metal, the rope over the bar, the light "seeping" through the wood planks on the ceiling, the communal tables, the ingenious copper pot sink - if for no other reason than it has the kind of finished, meticulous nonchalance that is so hard to find anywhere outside of the real, authentic New York (meaning, obviously, the world below the Ace Hotel, but north of Canal St, and including the real Brooklyn). I felt much the same way about the crowd (young! and old! and so well put together! ). As comfortable and as happy as I felt sitting there, I do wonder if I will look back at a scene like this down the line and think "Did I really like it when the room was carefully designed to look like an FIT student's idea an old German beerhall basement? Did I really think I looked good in those raggedy Nudie jeans?" But no matter, I lap this stuff up now.

As for the food, I'll echo the general sentiment and remark at how delicate everything was. A pickle plate didn't have bracing acidity or sourness, it tasted like the vinaigrette had subtly become a part of the beet, radish, and turnip. I loved it. The landjager sausage was remarkable because it looked so pretty on the slate slab with the dash of mustard and neat pile of pickle and unremarkable in every other way. The flatbread with speck and horseradish had the more assertive, rustic flavor that you would expect given the decor. It was crisp and porky and very satisfying.

Mains were, again, surprisingly delicate. My girlfriend's egg dish was presented with the kind of finesse that you'd expect of a restaurant owned by people sporting a macaroon uptown. The egg, and the pasta and squash dish our friends had, showed a delicate balance: some sweetness, some acid, some crunch. The only misstep was that the white from the soft poached eggs was a little too runny; the kitchen had not discarded the loose part of the white (uptown, that would go in the inspector's report). My schnitzel itself was fine, but the potato salad, cucumber salad, and lingonberry jam were perfect. The acid was right, the salt was right, the texture was right. It's not a hard trick, you can do it at home, but one that's messed up far too frequently.

Desserts were good enough but not a strong point. This was the one point of the meal where we wanted something more substantial. The apple-cream cake was too light. It shouldn't be the kind of dessert that everyone feels healthy about eating. The crepe with chocolate, hazelnut and schlag was better.

In sum, if I still lived in the hood, I would go all the time. I love the space and I love that they're serving food in that sort of rough, rustic space that is well presented, well seasoned, and light. I felt that while the room was of the moment, the food very much wasn't. It was too refreshing, too light. And that made me happy.

Comp disclosure: the draft line was busted so we got free bottles of beer.

I think you need to interpret what I'm saying in a reasonable way.


#27 oakapple

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Posted 31 January 2011 - 04:20 PM

As comfortable and as happy as I felt sitting there, I do wonder if I will look back at a scene like this down the line and think "Did I really like it when the room was carefully designed to look like an FIT student's idea an old German beerhall basement?

Actually, the inspiration is a Heuriger, or Austrian wine-tavern. I believe I read that the designer is Austrian, and the chefs certainly are. So rather than being an FIT student's rendition, it might actually be the real thing, or at least something approaching it.
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#28 Adrian

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Posted 31 January 2011 - 04:29 PM


As comfortable and as happy as I felt sitting there, I do wonder if I will look back at a scene like this down the line and think "Did I really like it when the room was carefully designed to look like an FIT student's idea an old German beerhall basement?

Actually, the inspiration is a Heuriger, or Austrian wine-tavern. I believe I read that the designer is Austrian, and the chefs certainly are. So rather than being an FIT student's rendition, it might actually be the real thing, or at least something approaching it.


Yes, Austrian, you're right. I'm sure it's a pretty good approximation (although it didn't really look like any place I was at when I was in Austria far too long ago to render a valuable judgment), but it's also a downtown Manhattan 2010 approximation, even if the designer is Austrian. I don't think many authentic Heuriger have LED lights between the ceiling planks to create the effect of being in a basement or use exposed metal piping to such great design effect (or use a tophat as a lampshade). It's kind of got a McNally or Friedman feel - you take an established, old world concept, run it through the downtown chic machine, throw in some reclaimed object as a design detail and all of a sudden it's cool. And I love that.

I think you need to interpret what I'm saying in a reasonable way.


#29 Sneakeater

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Posted 31 January 2011 - 04:31 PM

Adrian, I love these posts, but I'm sure you meant "chic machine".
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#30 Adrian

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Posted 31 January 2011 - 04:33 PM

Adrian, I love these posts, but I'm sure you meant "chic machine".


Ha! Not if it's funded by oil money. Edit made above.

I think you need to interpret what I'm saying in a reasonable way.