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Gougères


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#1 TaliesinNYC

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Posted 17 June 2011 - 08:39 PM

So.

There's a version that uses salt-packed anchovies in one of Alice Waters' cookbooks. My problem -- the recipe makes 40 small/20 large gougères.

Does the dough freeze well, do you think? These don't transport all that well, otherwise I'd bring them to work in a heartbeat.

#2 GG Mora

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Posted 17 June 2011 - 11:02 PM

So.

There's a version that uses salt-packed anchovies in one of Alice Waters' cookbooks. My problem -- the recipe makes 40 small/20 large gougères.

Does the dough freeze well, do you think? These don't transport all that well, otherwise I'd bring them to work in a heartbeat.

The dough does not freeze well. Baked gougeres/cream puffs/etc. freeze reasonably well and can be reheated in the oven. They won't have that just-baked steam release, though.

#3 Suzanne F

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 02:31 AM

True. But they'll still be delicious.

Make dough, bake all, let cool (or they'll be mush when thawed/reheated), freeze. Pop a few frozen ones in the toaster oven to go with cocktails. What time should I show up? :lol:

Actually, I'd think they would transport okay, as long as you packed them carefully. But are your coworkers worthy of them?

I don't actually know what a handbasket is -- but whatever they are, singer-songwriters are in the first ones going to hell. -- Sneakeater, 29 March 2018 - 12:06 AM

 

notorious stickler -- NY Times
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#4 Lippy

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 01:57 PM

Make dough, bake all, let cool (or they'll be mush when thawed/reheated), freeze. Pop a few frozen ones in the toaster oven to go with cocktails.

Yes, I used to do it often, when not dieting.

#5 Shaya

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 03:17 PM

I think they transport quite easily, I often take them to dinner parties.

#6 TaliesinNYC

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 06:25 PM

When I say they don't transport well, I mean, they'll be cold by the time I get to work. I don't know what a cold gougère tastes like but I'm almost willing to bet it's not quite the same as fresh out of the oven.

I was thinking that a better solution would be to cut the recipe in half.

AW's recipe is:

1/2 cup water
3 T. butter (presunably unsalted)
1/2 T. salt
1/2 cup flour
2 eggs
2-3 anchovies or 3 oz. Gruyere cheese, grated -- she gives two variations

so half would be

1/4 cup water
1 1/2 T. butter
1/4 T. salt
1/4 cup flour
1 egg
1 salt-packed anchovy, soaked in milk, then filleted and chopped

Think that would work? I *really* don't bake all that much.

#7 TaliesinNYC

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 06:27 PM

True. But they'll still be delicious.

Make dough, bake all, let cool (or they'll be mush when thawed/reheated), freeze. Pop a few frozen ones in the toaster oven to go with cocktails. What time should I show up? :lol:

Actually, I'd think they would transport okay, as long as you packed them carefully. But are your coworkers worthy of them?



Hey, it occurs to me that the next time there's a gathering at your place, I could bring these.

I'll be my own guinea pig this time out. :P

#8 Really Nice!

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 07:09 PM

Which book is it from? I have four (Cafe, Menu, Veg, and Green Kitchen) and I don't see it. I was looking to see if she describes how small 'small' is. I think you might be better off making the whole recipe and freezing what you don't use because you might be surprised how few half the recipe makes.

When I was in catering we used to serve profiterole's, which is a gougère minus the cheese, and they were filled with a mixture of cream cheese, bay shrimp, green onions, lemon juice, salt and pepper. We served them cold, which I didn't like because the crust would soften after a few hours of refrigeration.

#9 splinky

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 07:42 PM

Which book is it from? I have four (Cafe, Menu, Veg, and Green Kitchen) and I don't see it. I was looking to see if she describes how small 'small' is. I think you might be better off making the whole recipe and freezing what you don't use because you might be surprised how few half the recipe makes.

When I was in catering we used to serve profiterole's, which is a gougère minus the cheese, and they were filled with a mixture of cream cheese, bay shrimp, green onions, lemon juice, salt and pepper. We served them cold, which I didn't like because the crust would soften after a few hours of refrigeration.

there's a recipe for gougeres without anchovy in her the art of simple food. but it uses 1/2 teaspoon of salt rather than a half tablespoon listed above. half a tablespoon would be a lot of salt in those recipe proportions, even without the anchovy

“One thing kids like is to be tricked. For instance, I was going to take my little nephew to Disneyland, but instead I drove him to an old burned-out warehouse. 'Oh, no!', I said, 'Disneyland burned down.' He cried and cried, but I think that deep down he thought it was a pretty good joke. I started to drive over to the real Disneyland, but it was getting pretty late.”
~Jack Handey

*proud descendant of cheese eating surrender monkeys*

 


#10 TaliesinNYC

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 08:25 PM

yeah, ooops, 1/2 t.

thanks splinky

#11 prasantrin

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 10:36 PM

Dorie Greenspan says it's better to scoop them out, freeze them, and bake from frozen. I've baked them from frozen before, and my gougeres were beautiful.

#12 splinky

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 10:47 PM

i think i want to take a crack at gluten free gougeres. if they work, chocolate eclairs will be next

“One thing kids like is to be tricked. For instance, I was going to take my little nephew to Disneyland, but instead I drove him to an old burned-out warehouse. 'Oh, no!', I said, 'Disneyland burned down.' He cried and cried, but I think that deep down he thought it was a pretty good joke. I started to drive over to the real Disneyland, but it was getting pretty late.”
~Jack Handey

*proud descendant of cheese eating surrender monkeys*

 


#13 splinky

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Posted 19 June 2011 - 12:59 AM

gluten free gougeres

“One thing kids like is to be tricked. For instance, I was going to take my little nephew to Disneyland, but instead I drove him to an old burned-out warehouse. 'Oh, no!', I said, 'Disneyland burned down.' He cried and cried, but I think that deep down he thought it was a pretty good joke. I started to drive over to the real Disneyland, but it was getting pretty late.”
~Jack Handey

*proud descendant of cheese eating surrender monkeys*

 


#14 Suzanne F

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Posted 19 June 2011 - 02:30 PM

gluten free gougeres


Are they anything like pao de queijo (made with cassava flour)? That's kind of what they look like.

I don't actually know what a handbasket is -- but whatever they are, singer-songwriters are in the first ones going to hell. -- Sneakeater, 29 March 2018 - 12:06 AM

 

notorious stickler -- NY Times
deeply annoying and nitpicking -- Molly O'Neill, One Big Table


#15 splinky

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Posted 19 June 2011 - 02:45 PM


gluten free gougeres


Are they anything like pao de queijo (made with cassava flour)? That's kind of what they look like.

similar, these are made with sweet (glutinous)and brown rice flour and have a slightly better mouth feel to me. i see lots pate a choux in my future. you need a flour with high amylopectin and amylase content tempered with a protein rich flour. if i do it again, i will add one more egg, and use a smaller disher to get the round shape. also, i did not use an egg wash or cheese on the outside. still, it was a fun experiment

“One thing kids like is to be tricked. For instance, I was going to take my little nephew to Disneyland, but instead I drove him to an old burned-out warehouse. 'Oh, no!', I said, 'Disneyland burned down.' He cried and cried, but I think that deep down he thought it was a pretty good joke. I started to drive over to the real Disneyland, but it was getting pretty late.”
~Jack Handey

*proud descendant of cheese eating surrender monkeys*