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The Pete Wells Thread


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#5176 voyager

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Posted 12 May 2017 - 11:59 PM

That squid ring thing fell flat for me too, though my wife loved it. Not sure why. The only other thing I didn't like was that they pushed the plates on you so fast that we were out in under an hour (and totally stuffed). My favorite dish was a pork jowl, I think braised and then fried, with a barley risotto. We also had an excellent dessert, a panna cotta that had some crispy ginger things on it, though my memory of it is a few weeks old. I thought the food was very good, and for the price, unheard of.

 

This is a problem at small plate kitchens if your order happens to hit the order station in a slack period.    The best kitchens triage the order into a civilized menu.   Others send them out higgley piggley in a tsunami of soon forgotten plates..    Sad because some outstanding inspirations get lost in the train wreck.  


"A meal without wine is called breakfast."   Camille Fourmont


#5177 Wilfrid

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Posted 13 May 2017 - 12:05 AM

Higgledy piggledy.

:cruelpedant:

#5178 voyager

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Posted 13 May 2017 - 12:37 AM

Higgledy piggledy.

:cruelpedant:

Thanks.    I wrote off the cuff, never a good idea.

 

But note also, "Subject: Re: Etymology of "higgly piggly"
Answered By: pinkfreud-ga on 30 Oct 2006 16:49 PST

   
Higgly-piggly (often spelled "higgledy-piggledy" or "higly-pigly")
first appeared in print (using the spelling "higledi-pigledie") in
1598, in John Florio's "World of Wordes," a dictionary. The exact
history of the term is unknown, but most sources speculate that the
disorderly appearance and behavior of pigs may be related.

....""higly-pigly, adv = HIGGLEDY PIGGLEDY
1664 Homer à la Mode (N.), Just as neighbors higly-piglie, Let their
beasts graze, but then can quicklie... spy 'em from ev'ry one's i'th
town" "

"A meal without wine is called breakfast."   Camille Fourmont


#5179 Wilfrid

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Posted 13 May 2017 - 09:51 PM

Love it. :)

#5180 voyager

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Posted 13 May 2017 - 10:58 PM

Would have avoided all this had I just written "wily nily".   ;)


"A meal without wine is called breakfast."   Camille Fourmont


#5181 Lex

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Posted 13 May 2017 - 11:20 PM

Would have avoided all this had I just written "wily nily".   ;)


Just do what I do. Smile and wait. Sooner or later Wilf will make a mistake and you'll step out from behind a tree and patiently point it out.
"I don't understand what's wrong with thinking of correlation as a pricing convention the way one thinks of Black-Scholes vol. I mean, vol curves aren't "real" anyway, but nobody uses local vol models to price vanilla options." - Taion
 
"But this is blatant ultracrepidarianism on my part." - Taion

I have a dream of a multiplicity of pastramis.

"once the penis came out, there was discussions as to why we didn't order the testicles" - Daniel describing a meal in China

#5182 Suzanne F

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Posted Yesterday, 02:56 PM

We restaurant critics do more than fill our mouths and then flash our greasy thumbs up or down. We try to assess the way a place fits into its context, including its environment. Part of this is simply sorting out whether, say, a new Sichuan restaurant in Queens is as good as, better than or different from all the other Sichuan restaurants nearby. We ask whether it’s providing something the location doesn’t already have, and whether it makes sense there. These are separate questions: Queens might not have an overpriced, incompetent Sichuan restaurant, but that doesn’t mean opening one is a good idea. You don’t need to eat at Noma Mexico to know Tulum doesn’t have anything like it. But does it make sense there?
 
. . . At this point in his career, Mr. Redzepi could sell out a weenie roast in Death Valley. What I find hard to run through my critical algorithms, though, is the idea of a meal devoted to local traditions and ingredients that is being prepared and consumed mostly by people from somewhere else.
 
The Noma philosophy, from the start, was rigorously local. Mr. Redzepi drew a circle around the Nordic region and gathered almost all his ingredients from inside it, with rare exceptions. Noma founded a next-level locavorism that is widely if not always intelligently imitated, and one of its legacies is the notion that restaurants with global ambitions must demonstrate a strong attachment to their location.
 
This “sense of place” expectation animates a lot of the jousting behind the annual list of the World’s 50 Best Restaurants, among other things. And it has led to a strange new sight: dining rooms where expensive celebrations of the local environment are enjoyed largely by tourists.

 

Read on: "Why I'm Not Reviewing Noma Mexico"


[B]ragging rights are a side effect of hype. -- Sneakeater, 4 January 2017 - 02:21 PM

 

notorious stickler -- NY Times
deeply annoying and nitpicking -- Molly O'Neill, One Big Table


#5183 voyager

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Posted Yesterday, 03:10 PM

 

....it has led to a strange new sight: dining rooms where expensive celebrations of the local environment are enjoyed largely by tourists.

 
 

 

I hardly find this unusual at all in the last 20 years.   Starting with Chez Panisse, Stars, Hawthorne Lane up to Benu and friends.   None of these places could have existed without the custom of visitors.    Maybe it's just that we began celebrating local abundance earlier than other locales.   


"A meal without wine is called breakfast."   Camille Fourmont