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Mighty Quinn's (East Village BBQ)


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#1 Wilfrid

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Posted 24 December 2012 - 04:37 PM

If I'd made it to Fletcher's, as I'd hoped, maybe I'd have skipped Mighty Quinn's.  After all, I just went to Brisket Town.  But on a rainy night on Second Avenue, its lights beckoned.

 

It rates, I think, as pretty good.  It's certainly in the right place to do a good trade: heaps of meat at fair prices.  It also bucks the trend by offering swift, smooth, friendly service.

 

More at the Pig.



#2 Lex

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Posted 24 December 2012 - 05:20 PM

I was surprised at the efficiency of the place, especially since the Smorgasburg outpost makes a fetish out of inefficiency.  The counter was fully staffed and there was none of the hipster dreaminess that can turn even the simplest transaction into a 5 minute Portlandia sketch.

 

Behind the counter at the start of the line stood a friendy bearded fellow whose only job seemed to be to explain the 7 meat choices to the novice BBQ customers.  A sort of BBQ sommelier. 

 

At the storefront outpost of Mighty Quinn's I had the brisket sandwich, a bigger version of the one they sell at Smorgasburg.  The same one that can be obtained by waiting on a 30 minute line.

 

6956656878_5e6c18d4f0_z.jpg

 

The storefront outpost of MQ has the tremendous advantage of allowing you to walk up and get your sandwich in about 4 minutes and then sit down like a civilized human and enjoy it with a beer.  You don't have to wolf it down standing on a beerless sun blasted dust plain.

 

How was it?  It was a nice sandwich but if David's pastrami or Mile End's smoked meat rate as 10s, this was a 6 or a 7 at best. 

 

I wouldn't take this as a critical knock on Mighty Quinn, it's really a concession that I am fundamentally unable to appreciate BBQ.  I am missing the BBQ gene.  Too bad - it's my loss.

 

Shelby Foote once said that Gen. U.S. Grant was totally unable to appreciate music.  He knew only 2 songs.  One was "Yankee Doodle" and the other one wasn't.  That summarizes my abilities to judge BBQ.


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I have a dream of a multiplicity of pastramis.

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#3 Sneakeater

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Posted 24 December 2012 - 09:16 PM

Fletcher's also has one of the Barbecue Sommelier guys at the head of the counter.

 

It's a good idea.


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#4 Orik

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Posted 24 December 2012 - 09:46 PM

What's this called? The old jew?

 

http://www.pinkpigny...d08c0970b-800wi


sandwiches that are large and filling and do not contain tuna or prawns

#5 Orik

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Posted 24 December 2012 - 09:52 PM

How was it?  It was a nice sandwich but if David's pastrami or Mile End's smoked meat rate as 10s, this was a 6 or a 7 at best. 

 

I'll try avoid getting into the intricate differences between pastrami, "smoked meat", and texas brisket, but I agree with you they relate this way (that is, MQ's stuff is nothing to write home about, although mostly it's not terrible, and even when it is terrible they sell it anyway)


sandwiches that are large and filling and do not contain tuna or prawns

#6 Sneakeater

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Posted 24 December 2012 - 10:16 PM

What's this called? The old jew?

 

http://www.pinkpigny...d08c0970b-800wi

I tried to "like" this post, but the button won't let you push itself.


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#7 Wilfrid

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Posted 24 December 2012 - 10:32 PM

I was tempted to comment on that sausage.



#8 Sneakeater

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Posted 24 December 2012 - 11:00 PM

You'd need the strength of ten to resist.


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#9 Suzanne F

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 11:44 PM

Piece in NY Times "At the Table"


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#10 Stone

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 02:03 AM

I stopped by with a friend for dinner tonight.  The joint was jumping at 7:30.  It was pretty good, but not great.

 

I ordered single orders of brisket (lean), ribs and sausage.  The brisket was a tad firm/dry.  Not bad, but I know brisket can be better.  :)  The ribs were nice and meaty with a good rub.  The sausage also good, and not too greasy.  (The Kraeusz or whatever at Hill Country is inedible to me.)  I think each single portion is $8, and they were decent sized, but not large.  My ribs came from the end, so they weren't as big as my friend's portion.  My one real problem was that they sprinkled some coarse ground salt over everything before serving.  They've already got a spicy rub on them, and I found this overbearing to the point of unpleasantness.  I also had a small order of beans, which was very good.  

 

The whole mess cost $34, including a $7 draft porter (in a plastic cup!). It was a copious amount of food.  I think just two might have been too small.  

 

Its good bbq.  Nothing special, but certainly better than the dreck I had at my last trip to Hill Country.  It's been too long since I visited Blue Smoke or Daisy May.  I don't really remember how they compare.


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#11 Wilfrid

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 03:24 AM

Fair summary, although we didn't have the mad salt sprinkling. 

 

I do prefer the fatty Kreuz sausages, but I know I shouldn't.  You need to get to BrisketTown to see the real competition.



#12 foodie52

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 02:03 AM

Wow: did you know that was a Bob Dylan song??? http://en.wikipedia...._(Mighty_Quinn)


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#13 Sneakeater

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 06:28 AM

Were you boycotting radio in 1968, foodie?

 


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#14 Sneakeater

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 06:34 AM

(It strikes me as tempting fate to name a barbecue joint after a song whose best line is, "Just ain't my cup of meat.")


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#15 Rail Paul

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 10:48 PM

Not to distract from the Pete Wells two star discussion, but here's one comment from the NYT review:

 

 

Recently I started a fantasy barbecue league. Now I’m building my dream New York City barbecue restaurant with elements from all over town. I’ve got the soundtrack and the corn pudding from Hill Country; the pickles and chili mac from Fletcher’s; the pork belly and beers from Fette Sau; the beans, pulled pork, brisket and both kinds of ribs from Mighty Quinn’s; the enthusiasm, atmosphere and cheese from BrisketTown.

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.c...anted=2&_r=0


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