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Explosions at the Boston Marathon


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#31 Rich

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 03:34 PM

"One Saudi interviewed."

 

I may be wrong, but I don't think anyone would report, "one Nebraskan interviewed."  "One Lutheran interviewed."  "One NRA member interviewed."  Perhaps "one Austrian interviewed."

Could even hear them say that no Stone was left unturned.

 

They would never say one Vaticanite was interviewed.



#32 Adrian

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 03:34 PM

"One Canadian interviewed"

on the cbc, they only interview Canadians. because that's the story here.


I think you need to interpret what I'm saying in a reasonable way.


#33 Lex

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 03:45 PM

"One Saudi interviewed."

 

I may be wrong, but I don't think anyone would report, "one Nebraskan interviewed."  "One Lutheran interviewed."  "One NRA member interviewed."  Perhaps "one Austrian interviewed."

 

Of the 19 9/11 hijackers, 15 were Saudis.  People remember that, just like they'd remember if 15 were Swedish grandmothers.


"I don't understand what's wrong with thinking of correlation as a pricing convention the way one thinks of Black-Scholes vol. I mean, vol curves aren't "real" anyway, but nobody uses local vol models to price vanilla options." - Taion
 
"But this is blatant ultracrepidarianism on my part." - Taion

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#34 Nathan

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 03:52 PM

Well, the meaning of domestic is getting kind of blurry.

 

True.  If you were radicalized by Alaqi's Youtube videos and then found the bomb recipe in Inspire is that truly domestic?  (not making any assumptions...I can think of at least three reasonable completely different possibilities as to the perp)

 

I've been able to find online that my ex (Sneakeater knows who I'm talking about) finished the race shortly before the explosions.  I assume that she went off to a recovery corral and didn't go off to the side there....

 

we're very very fortunate that these were quite small devices (considering the densely packed crowd).  the amazing fatality to wounded ratio is a result of the enormous strides that we've made in mascal preparation over the past decade as well as the strides made in trauma care (unfortunately due to IEDs in Iraq and Afghanistan...we're much better at saving people after extremity loss...and city emergency rooms are filled with former military docs and nurses).  add in that the distance running (and triathlon) community has a close intersection with the military and you had a lot of people on the scene with CLS (combat lifesaver training)....thus all the instant tourniquets with people's shirts and belts.  That saved numerous lives.


Blatantly Obvious Disclaimer:

My opinions are obviously my personal opinions. Not yours. Not universal.


#35 Wilfrid

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 04:16 PM

Well, the meaning of domestic is getting kind of blurry.

 

My usage was certainly ambiguous.  I just meant to refer to the mainland United States, not to the provenance of the culprits.



#36 Rail Paul

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 04:20 PM

Well, the meaning of domestic is getting kind of blurry.

 

True.  If you were radicalized by Alaqi's Youtube videos and then found the bomb recipe in Inspire is that truly domestic?  (not making any assumptions...I can think of at least three reasonable completely different possibilities as to the perp)

 

I've been able to find online that my ex (Sneakeater knows who I'm talking about) finished the race shortly before the explosions.  I assume that she went off to a recovery corral and didn't go off to the side there....

 

we're very very fortunate that these were quite small devices (considering the densely packed crowd).  the amazing fatality to wounded ratio is a result of the enormous strides that we've made in mascal preparation over the past decade as well as the strides made in trauma care (unfortunately due to IEDs in Iraq and Afghanistan...we're much better at saving people after extremity loss...and city emergency rooms are filled with former military docs and nurses).  add in that the distance running (and triathlon) community has a close intersection with the military and you had a lot of people on the scene with CLS (combat lifesaver training)....thus all the instant tourniquets with people's shirts and belts.  That saved numerous lives.

 

Yes.

 

There was a mention of this on WNYC this morning. A surgeon who had just finished the race hurried to the medical / triage tent and was amazed at the competence and materials of the people already at work.  Having equipment (wheelchairs, gurneys, stretchers and blankets etc) at the ready made a huge difference in immediate response.


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#37 GordonCooks

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 04:31 PM

Another way of looking at it is that the United States is beginning, still in quite a small way, to resemble the rest of the world.

 

This is exactly how I'm looking at it.

this statement makes little sense to me. what does it mean?

 

I think many Americans have enjoyed the luxury of complacency. Largely unaffected by the religious persecutions, financial perils, and infrastructural failures suffered by much larger populations. Things become quite urgent when they happen on your doorstep.

 

This, of course, is on a scale of varying degree especially for those who have lived in NY for many years.


Jazz is musical improvisation; it is the art of the moment. In the recording of jazz, the inspiration and inventiveness of this moment is made permanent by technology, giving pleasure many years after the performance.

Photography is jazz for the eye. - William Claxton

#38 Adrian

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 04:36 PM

Another way of looking at it is that the United States is beginning, still in quite a small way, to resemble the rest of the world.

 

This is exactly how I'm looking at it.

this statement makes little sense to me. what does it mean?

 

I think many Americans have enjoyed the luxury of complacency. Largely unaffected by the religious persecutions, financial perils, and infrastructural failures suffered by much larger populations. Things become quite urgent when they happen on your doorstep.

 

This, of course, is on a scale of varying degree especially for those who have lived in NY for many years.

I think that's factually inaccurate. Though I'm not going to presume that this is what Wilf meant.


I think you need to interpret what I'm saying in a reasonable way.


#39 Lex

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 04:43 PM

This, of course, is on a scale of varying degree especially for those who have lived in NY for many years.

I've taken to measuring terrorist attacks using 9/11 as my Richter scale.

In WW2 the London blitz killed about 43,000 people. That's 14.3 9/11s.
"I don't understand what's wrong with thinking of correlation as a pricing convention the way one thinks of Black-Scholes vol. I mean, vol curves aren't "real" anyway, but nobody uses local vol models to price vanilla options." - Taion
 
"But this is blatant ultracrepidarianism on my part." - Taion

I have a dream of a multiplicity of pastramis.

"once the penis came out, there was discussions as to why we didn't order the testicles" - Daniel describing a meal in China

#40 Rich

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 04:59 PM

This, of course, is on a scale of varying degree especially for those who have lived in NY for many years.

I've taken to measuring terrorist attacks using 9/11 as my Richter scale.

In WW2 the London blitz killed about 43,000 people. That's 14.3 9/11s.

As much as the London blitz was horrific, it can't be considered a terrorist attack. Both countries were engaged in a declared war.

 

If that's the standard, the attacks on Hiroshima and Nagisaki killed about a million (eventually).



#41 Wilfrid

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 05:20 PM

Historical context from the Times: the 1970s was a big decade for terrorism, which has been on a decline in the US ever since.



#42 Lex

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 05:24 PM


As much as the London blitz was horrific, it can't be considered a terrorist attack. Both countries were engaged in a declared war.
 
If that's the standard, the attacks on Hiroshima and Nagisaki killed about a million (eventually).
 
Call it attacks on civilians.
"I don't understand what's wrong with thinking of correlation as a pricing convention the way one thinks of Black-Scholes vol. I mean, vol curves aren't "real" anyway, but nobody uses local vol models to price vanilla options." - Taion
 
"But this is blatant ultracrepidarianism on my part." - Taion

I have a dream of a multiplicity of pastramis.

"once the penis came out, there was discussions as to why we didn't order the testicles" - Daniel describing a meal in China

#43 Rich

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 05:32 PM


As much as the London blitz was horrific, it can't be considered a terrorist attack. Both countries were engaged in a declared war.
 
If that's the standard, the attacks on Hiroshima and Nagisaki killed about a million (eventually).
 
Call it attacks on civilians.

Civilians can't be specifically targeted. However major cities are fair game, since they house the leadership and strategic commands - and possibly military targets (both offense and defense). If civilians were the target both the United States and Germany would have been brought to trial for war crimes. Neither was, but Germany was brought to trial for war crimes based on the holocaust, which specifically targeted civilians.



#44 Lex

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 05:34 PM

I'm going to politely disagree and leave it at that. No need to make Sneak's job harder.
"I don't understand what's wrong with thinking of correlation as a pricing convention the way one thinks of Black-Scholes vol. I mean, vol curves aren't "real" anyway, but nobody uses local vol models to price vanilla options." - Taion
 
"But this is blatant ultracrepidarianism on my part." - Taion

I have a dream of a multiplicity of pastramis.

"once the penis came out, there was discussions as to why we didn't order the testicles" - Daniel describing a meal in China

#45 GordonCooks

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 05:45 PM

Another way of looking at it is that the United States is beginning, still in quite a small way, to resemble the rest of the world.

 

This is exactly how I'm looking at it.

this statement makes little sense to me. what does it mean?

 

I think many Americans have enjoyed the luxury of complacency. Largely unaffected by the religious persecutions, financial perils, and infrastructural failures suffered by much larger populations. Things become quite urgent when they happen on your doorstep.

 

This, of course, is on a scale of varying degree especially for those who have lived in NY for many years.

I think that's factually inaccurate. Though I'm not going to presume that this is what Wilf meant.

 

The perception is of course, my own,,,and maybe different from those living in a major metropolitan center.


Jazz is musical improvisation; it is the art of the moment. In the recording of jazz, the inspiration and inventiveness of this moment is made permanent by technology, giving pleasure many years after the performance.

Photography is jazz for the eye. - William Claxton