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Visit which Willamette Valley wineries?


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#1 Peter Creasey

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Posted 28 July 2013 - 06:17 PM

Which of these Willamette Valley wineries might folks here recommend visiting?

Sokol Blosser
Penner Ash
Domaine Drouhin
Bergstrom
Lange
Lachini
Beaux Freres
Patricia Green
Shea
Monks Gate
Youngberg Hill
Carlton

 

Or perhaps any others?

Thanks!
 


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#2 Rail Paul

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Posted 28 July 2013 - 08:14 PM

Dee and I were delighted with a 2009 visit.

 

Domaine Drouhin was delightful.  We had an introduction from a wine buyer who is known to the winery, but the overall tasting, tour, etc was very nice.  A quick peek at their website suggests they have tours, etc for people of varying interest levels

 

We also visited another winery that had a Celtic influence, maybe an Irish cross on the label? 

 

Have a great time.

 

If you're that close, I'd also suggest a detour down to Newport Oregon. The Rogue brewery is there, as well as some superb crabs, salmon, etc.  Good whale watching, in season, too.


“It must be remembered that there is nothing more difficult to plan, more doubtful of success, nor more dangerous to manage than a new system. For the initiator has the enmity of all who would profit by the preservation of the old institution and merely lukewarm defenders in those who gain by the new ones. ”
Niccolò Machiavelli

#3 GordonCooks

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 11:44 AM

Very partial to Shea and Beaux Freres pinots but have never visited either.


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#4 Lauren

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 06:10 PM

I haven't been to any Willamette Wineries in years but my favorite wines are Domaine Drouhin and Patricia Green. I went to a great wine dinner with Sokol Blosser a few years ago.

 

If you get a chance, head up to Walla Walla. I can provide more recommendations for there.


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#5 Really Nice!

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 09:57 PM

My recollection isn't what it used to be but aren't most of the wineries open only on Memorial Day weekend or thanksgiving weekend?

Anyway, here's a link that may help;
http://willamettewines.com/wineries/

We enjoyed Sokol Blosser and for the first time we had their Evolution Number 9; a poor man's Conundrum. It was good, about $12 a bottle, and was our house white for a while.

My recollection isn't what it used to be but aren't most... Oh, never mind.

#6 tighe

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Posted 30 July 2013 - 05:59 AM

Been years since I visited as well, but always liked WillaKenzie.


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#7 malarkey

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 01:59 PM

Been awhile since I've been there as well but across the way from Drouhin is a lovely winery that has a great view across the valley. Italian style architecture... someone help me out here!


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#8 GordonCooks

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 03:39 PM

Been awhile since I've been there as well but across the way from Drouhin is a lovely winery that has a great view across the valley. Italian style architecture... someone help me out here!

 I know NYSA is close to DDrouhin.


Jazz is musical improvisation; it is the art of the moment. In the recording of jazz, the inspiration and inventiveness of this moment is made permanent by technology, giving pleasure many years after the performance.

Photography is jazz for the eye. - William Claxton

#9 Rail Paul

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Posted 25 October 2015 - 09:42 PM

The owners of our favorite Stuart FL hanging out place sent an email "postcard" from YoungBerg Hill, a winery in McMinville, Oregon. They'll be back at the Pelican Landing in a few weeks.

 

Well regarded maker of pinot noir

100 wineries within 20 minutes

On site bed and breakfast

Tesla charging station

 

 

http://www.youngberghill.com/


“It must be remembered that there is nothing more difficult to plan, more doubtful of success, nor more dangerous to manage than a new system. For the initiator has the enmity of all who would profit by the preservation of the old institution and merely lukewarm defenders in those who gain by the new ones. ”
Niccolò Machiavelli

#10 Rail Paul

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Posted 01 October 2016 - 07:14 PM

The Wall Street Journal updates its touring guide to the Willamette Valley wineries and restaurants.

 

 

The greatest Newberg attractions, however, lie outside of downtown. That’s where you’ll find the Allison Inn & Spa, the valley’s only glamorous, Napa-style resort. It boasts both a fancy, garden-to-table restaurant (Jory) and a modern spa. A number of notable wineries also have Newberg addresses, including Brick House Vineyard, Bergström Wines and Roco Winery, all located in the hills. Larger Newberg wineries, like Rex Hill and August Cellars, are found along the highway.

August Cellars is actually a consortium of small producers. One of them, Tyson Crowley, was recommended to me by David Millman, of Domaine Drouhin Oregon in Dayton, so I stopped by for a chat and a taste of some very good Chardonnays and Pinot Noirs. (Mr. Millman’s recommendation is the sort of collegiality regularly practiced here—something I haven’t always encountered in more fashionable wine locales). Mr. Crowley, who only makes a small amount of wine each year, conducts tastings in his barrel room as the August Cellars tasting room only offers a few of his wines.

 

 

 Tina’s, a popular dinner spot in Dundee, the restaurant serves classic dishes such as seared duck breast and poached salmon Troisgros.

 

Dundee is also home to some of the other most popular restaurants in the Willamette Valley (the Dundee Bistro, Red Hills Provincial Dining) and some of its top wineries (Argyle, Erath, Lange Estate). One of the most recent additions, Purple Hands Winery, opened its new tasting room the week of my visit. I was tipped off to the news by Karen Utz, owner of Black Walnut Inn & Vineyard, a stylish, Tuscany-meets-Oregon bed-and-breakfast where I spent two nights.

The workers were putting the finishing touches on the space, and Purple Hands winemaker and owner Cody Wright was pouring his own Pinots when I stopped by for a tasting. Mr. Wright is descended from Oregon winemaking royalty; Ken Wright, whom Wine Spectator called “a master of Pinot Noir,” is his father, and Roco Winery’s Mr. Soles is his stepfather. But he’s humble about his connections: “Just because I am who I am doesn’t mean my wines are any good.” In fact, they’re very good, especially the 2014 Holstein Vineyard Pinot Noir ($50).

 

 

 

Many interesting suggestions., and many small vineyards.

 

 

http://www.wsj.com/a...ches-1474552071


“It must be remembered that there is nothing more difficult to plan, more doubtful of success, nor more dangerous to manage than a new system. For the initiator has the enmity of all who would profit by the preservation of the old institution and merely lukewarm defenders in those who gain by the new ones. ”
Niccolò Machiavelli

#11 Peter Creasey

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Posted 02 October 2016 - 12:58 AM

Paul,  good article, especially since it highlighted the world-class Allison Inn...except, it is suspect as it (I believe) failed to mention Antica Terra.


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. . "for the discreet and refined enjoyment of uncommon wine . .
. . . . and victuals and the companionship accruing thereto" . . . .

#12 Rail Paul

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 10:17 PM

Antica Terra gets good exposure in this article about the"new" Oregon wine trail.  Maggie Harrison even has a picture in the article, looking pensive. The success of Domaine Drouhin has legitimized the area to the French, so wine makers and Euro are flowing in. There's also a growing presence of Chard growers.

 

 

But after spending 10 days here in late July, visiting winemakers, tasting an awful lot of bottles and, incidentally, speaking at the International Pinot Noir Celebration, I can’t help but conclude that Oregon is right now the single most exciting winemaking area in the United States.

That is not to say that great things are not happening in the rest of the country. I am fascinated by what producers are achieving all over California; in Walla Walla, Wash.; and in the Finger Lakes region of New York. Great wines are being made in Michigan, in Vermont, in Texas and beyond

Collectively speaking, nowhere else does the level of quality seem so high, the perspectives so diverse or the experimentation so fierce as it is in Oregon right now.

 

Here in the Willamette Valley, pinot noir is the dominant story, and it is hard to argue with its success. Pioneers like The Eyrie Vineyards, arguably the first to succeed with pinot noir in the 1970s, and Domaine Drouhin Oregon, whose founding in 1987 by the renowned Burgundy house Joseph Drouhin gave international credibility to the region, have grown and evolved, humming along on success after success.

 

https://www.nytimes....ref=dining&_r=0


“It must be remembered that there is nothing more difficult to plan, more doubtful of success, nor more dangerous to manage than a new system. For the initiator has the enmity of all who would profit by the preservation of the old institution and merely lukewarm defenders in those who gain by the new ones. ”
Niccolò Machiavelli

#13 Peter Creasey

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Posted 15 September 2017 - 12:21 AM

I have frequently said that our tasting at Antica Terra was the best tasting I've ever been privileged to encounter.

 

Their facility (at that time, at least) was totally off-putting, but once inside it all made total sense and then the wines and light fare were extraordinary.  Maggie wasn't present at the time of our visit, unfortunately, but still the tasting stands out in my mind as the best among many, including events in Burgundy, Napa, Sonoma, etc.


_________________
. . . . . . . . . . . . . Pete/Houston
SOAC . . .
. . "for the discreet and refined enjoyment of uncommon wine . .
. . . . and victuals and the companionship accruing thereto" . . . .