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Which is better? Farmed or wild fish...


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#46 mitchells

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Posted 09 October 2014 - 04:54 PM

While on a Tab Benoit music cruise around Manhattan, Tab wanted to know why no one on board had a fishing pole. When told about the quality or lack thereof of what is swimming in the East River and the Hudson, he said where he comes from, people have a lot of experience making all sorts of crap taste good! That's why Tabasco was invented in Louisiana.



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#47 Sneakeater

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Posted 09 October 2014 - 05:44 PM

There's crap and there's deadly crap.
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#48 joethefoodie

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Posted 09 October 2014 - 07:41 PM

Actually, I think I'd eat a striped bass caught in the East River. I just wouldn't buy it from a guy, out of a bucket, on E. Broadway...

 

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#49 Sneakeater

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 04:18 AM

Wild.


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#50 Rail Paul

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Posted 16 November 2014 - 12:10 AM

The Wall Street Journal has a weekender article about farmed fish.  Lots of statistics.

 

56% of all shrimp are farmed, many of these in southeast Asia

42% of all fish consumption comes from farmed sources

90% of all Atlantic salmon are farmed

 

bluefin tuna experiments in Japan are proving successful, after 20 years of typhoons, breeding mistakes, etc

 

Toyota is now a powerful presence in fish farming.  With that company's kaizen approach, survival for hatched tuna is now about 1 in one hundred, up from one in 30 million for eggs hatched in the ocean

 

Mitsubishi, another player, expects to sell 40 tons of tuna this year from its tuna ranch.

 

There's growing concern that the fish genetics may be at risk, as the lines derive from a single breeding in 2002. Efforts to broaden the genetic base by bringing in wild bluefin have been unsuccessful

 

http://online.wsj.co...ates-1415984616


Dreams come in all sizes, shapes, and colors.

#51 Anthony Bonner

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Posted 16 November 2014 - 12:33 AM

That 90% farmed salmon number sounds low.

"This is a battle of who blinks first, and we've cut off our eyelids"


#52 Rail Paul

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Posted 16 November 2014 - 03:01 PM

That 90% farmed salmon number sounds low.

 

You're correct.  I mis-remembered the Atlantic  salmon number, which should be 99%. Per the article.


Dreams come in all sizes, shapes, and colors.

#53 Orik

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Posted 16 November 2014 - 03:08 PM

I just saw a list of highly regarded restaurants in Japan that use farmed fish:


sandwiches that are large and filling and do not contain tuna or prawns

#54 Rail Paul

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Posted 16 November 2014 - 03:54 PM

I just saw a list of highly regarded restaurants in Japan that use farmed fish:

 

The article mentioned that some of the bluefin is so fatty that the fish farmers had to modify the  diet.


Dreams come in all sizes, shapes, and colors.

#55 Rail Paul

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Posted 28 October 2015 - 10:01 PM

Quartz picks up the early 2015 report on mis-labeled fish.  Same facts, nice graphics.  Salmon is likely to be Atlantic farmed, regardless of what the menu says.  That chinook might be chum.

 

 

Because farmed salmon is produced in much higher volumes and is generally of lower quality, it’s cheaper, undercutting the price on wild-caught salmon. Mislabeling exacerbates the price on fishermen’s prices, says Christa Hoover, executive director of the Copper River/Prince William Sound Marketing Association, which represents major salmon fishing communities in Alaska.

“If the consumer is unsure that the wild salmon in a seafood case is in fact Copper River sockeye, for instance, it is much easier to purchase a lower cost farmed salmon fillet, reducing the sales of wild salmon,” she says, “and of course reducing the demand reduces the ex-vessel price paid to fishermen.”

Thanks in part to lax demand from American consumers, the US exports about 70% of its wild salmon catch, while simultaneously importing a higher volume of salmon—most of it farmed.

 

http://qz.com/535208...ctually-farmed/


Dreams come in all sizes, shapes, and colors.

#56 Anthony Bonner

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Posted 29 May 2018 - 02:45 PM

Just laughing at the ooh and aah'ing on instagram at a way too small farmed turbot on a newly opened tasting restaurant in town.

 

Like just eat a flounder or something. At that size, there is nothing turbot-y about that turbot.


"This is a battle of who blinks first, and we've cut off our eyelids"