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Cookware, the basics again


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#76 joethefoodie

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Posted 04 February 2017 - 04:53 PM

They can certainly be a pain in the ass to season, though cooking in them and properly cleaning, drying and oiling will eventually get them seasoned. There's also the oven method and the stove-top method, similar to wok and/or cast iron seasoning.

 

Advantages are that they will be naturally nonstick once seasoned properly, they are lighter than cast iron and they heat up and cool down much more quickly than cast iron.

 

They're much different than stainless lined pans, such as All-Clad, which are not nonstick.

 

They look cool once seasoned.

 

More on the De Buyer pans here. 



#77 splinky

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Posted 04 February 2017 - 05:15 PM

i love my debuyer crepe pan. i thought i'd like the expensive demeyere one more but once seasoned the debuyer gets the job done no muss no fuss


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#78 Sneakeater

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Posted 30 June 2017 - 07:07 PM

Not having gone on about them for a while, I just want to note how much I'm still loving my All-Clad Copper Core cookware.

 

The improvement in my cooking has actually been noticeable.


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#79 Sneakeater

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Posted 30 June 2017 - 07:58 PM

I see from reading the internets that the line is considered hopelessly middle-brow.

 

But if you're a real-life cook who wants both improved conductivity and ease of cleaning, they are a good way to go.


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#80 joethefoodie

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Posted 01 July 2017 - 12:37 PM

I think another reason your cooking has gotten better (not that any of us have tried any of it), is, well, because you're cooking!



#81 Lex

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Posted 01 July 2017 - 04:06 PM

I think another reason your cooking has gotten better (not that any of us have tried any of it), is, well, because you're cooking!

 

I think so too.


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#82 Rail Paul

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Posted 01 July 2017 - 06:07 PM

Malcolm Gladwell proposed the 10,000 hour rule. Do anything for that length of time and you'll probably do OK.

Cooking is no different. What would it taste like if I used Panko crumbs? Or, would this recipe work with a drum fish?
Dreams come in all sizes, shapes, and colors.

#83 voyager

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Posted 01 July 2017 - 07:26 PM

Not entirely buying the 10,000 hour maxim. As husband often separates pro from novice, some people agave done a job 200 times while others have done it once 200 times, learning nothing in the process.

It's not my circus,

not my monkeys.


#84 Sneakeater

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Posted 02 July 2017 - 04:26 AM

Watching myself make dinner tonight, I came to the firm conclusion that it's the cookware.


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#85 mongo_jones

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Posted 28 March 2019 - 12:30 AM

so after all these years i'm finally considering some good cookware, namely all-clad copper core. any reason to get anything beyond the following:

 

12 inch fry pan

5 qt saute pan

2 qt saucier

 

are the 12 inch fry and the 5 qt saute pan replicating each other. what would i use the 12 inch fry pan for that i couldn't just use the 5 qt saute pan for with the lid off? better to get a smaller fry pan instead? something else?


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#86 joethefoodie

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Posted 28 March 2019 - 12:08 PM

Not to discourage anyone from owning All Clad Copper core, but they (All-Clad) have some really great marketing going on, and is 5 ply really necessary, with that very thin layer of copper stuck in there?

 

You can get a Falk almost 2 quart saucier for only slightly more than the All-Clad; I think they're worth the investment. 

 

If you're stuck on All Clad, however, why not just go with their classic stuff? The copper is not really adding much, other than something good to look at.



#87 mongo_jones

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Posted 28 March 2019 - 01:51 PM

but i missed the falk sale. how can i buy their stuff now?


my annoying opinions: whisky, food and occasional cultural commentary

 

current restaurant review: house of curry (sri lankan in rosemount, mn)

 

current whisky review: glen ord 28

 

current recipe: white bean curry with green peppers

 

 

facts are meaningless. you could use facts to prove anything that's even remotely true!
~homer simpson


 


#88 joethefoodie

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Posted 28 March 2019 - 03:14 PM

but i missed the falk sale. how can i buy their stuff now?

Wait for the next sale - they do have a couple of pieces on sale in their "try me" area, but limit to one piece.

 

Seriously, if you want to actually cook with copper stuff, it ain't the all clad copper-core.



#89 mongo_jones

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Posted 28 March 2019 - 03:42 PM

now, i'm thinking one of the cheaper all-clad lines. is there any benefit to tri-ply over bi-ply? is that third stainless steel layer good for anything beyond looks?


my annoying opinions: whisky, food and occasional cultural commentary

 

current restaurant review: house of curry (sri lankan in rosemount, mn)

 

current whisky review: glen ord 28

 

current recipe: white bean curry with green peppers

 

 

facts are meaningless. you could use facts to prove anything that's even remotely true!
~homer simpson


 


#90 AaronS

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Posted 28 March 2019 - 04:52 PM

I have the all-clad tri-ply stuff and they look and work the same as they did the day I got them, despite using them to deep fry, burning the hell out of something I forgot I was cooking, etc, etc.

I’d think the ease of moving the 12 skillet around with one hand makes it worth having in addition to the sauté pan even though the cooking surface is the same. I do have some cast iron skillets for cooking meat that give better results than the all clad skilled would with things like steak.