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Micromanage my wine pairings?


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#1 voyager

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Posted 06 October 2015 - 04:11 PM

Couldn't find a comparable thread, so here goes.   

 

I'm resurrecting an old workhorse from the 60s to serve in the living room before dinner:   (italian tuna/pickled veggie/tomato) antipasto.    Considering the pickle influence and the red wine vinegar in the "sauce", what do you suggest for wine?    I'm considering a pinot gris or friend.    On base or not?   Haven't the slightest memory of what used to work, or in those days did we care?


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#2 Wilfrid

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Posted 06 October 2015 - 04:14 PM

I think it would suit the period and the dish to take a dry martini.



#3 Sneakeater

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Posted 06 October 2015 - 04:15 PM

Sherry?


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#4 Peter Creasey

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Posted 06 October 2015 - 05:28 PM

Viognier or Muscadet or maybe a dry Riesling.


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#5 voyager

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Posted 06 October 2015 - 05:47 PM

I like all of these suggestions.    Have better viognier and riesling on hand than sherry.    I actually like the martini concept but I think these people are that in between generation that never got off on martinis, now into good wine.    By the way, is there a "martini story" thread here?    I can imagine some lulus.


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#6 joethefoodie

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Posted 07 October 2015 - 03:27 PM

Make 'em a good martini and trust me, they'll "get off."

 

Or a 50/50 Martini.

 

Or a Bamboo.

 

That is, if you want a cocktail.

 

And I could actually see a Negroni going nicely with that antipasto.



#7 voyager

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Posted 10 October 2015 - 05:54 AM

Went with sherry. Stunning! A revelation of "whole is greater than sum etc. Plus one guest almost sobbed as she recalled her Italian nana serving similar antipasto. A great retro.

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not my monkeys.


#8 Neocon maudit

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Posted 05 November 2015 - 05:21 AM

Does Albariño go well with tacos?



#9 Sneakeater

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Posted 05 November 2015 - 05:24 AM

I don't see that myself.


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#10 Sneakeater

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Posted 05 November 2015 - 05:24 AM

What kind of tacos?


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#11 Neocon maudit

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Posted 05 November 2015 - 01:54 PM

We got tacos from Los Gueros ['los gueros' means blondes?] in Bloomfield.  I got carnitas and al pastor. 

 

I decided to try albariño owing to its reputation as a summer wine.  The particular one we got wasn't necessarily the greatest match.  I think something drier would have been more appropriate.



#12 joethefoodie

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Posted 05 November 2015 - 02:02 PM

We're going to be in Rome when Roscioli is doing this tasting:

 

here we are with a historical portrait of Trebbiano, Cerasuolo and Montepulciano.

 

 

Valentini. A historic vertical

 

 

Montepulciano in years: 1990, 1994, 1995, 1997, 2006

Trebbiano in years: 1990, 1992, 1995, 1998, 2000, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2010

Cerasuolo in years: 2006, 2009

 

 

Thoughts? It's 90 euros for the tasting and I'm pretty sure there's at least some food involved.

 

Sounds like a really big hangover is inevitable.



#13 Sneakeater

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Posted 05 November 2015 - 03:10 PM

We got tacos from Los Gueros ['los gueros' means blondes?] in Bloomfield.  I got carnitas and al pastor. 

 

I decided to try albariño owing to its reputation as a summer wine.  The particular one we got wasn't necessarily the greatest match.  I think something drier would have been more appropriate.

 

To tell you the truth, I'm not a big fan of wine with Mexican food to begin with.


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#14 Wilfrid

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Posted 05 November 2015 - 03:12 PM

With Mexican food, as with Indian, I tend to go big, red and fruity.  I think anything else gets lost.  I know there's a pro-Riesling school of thought with Indian food.



#15 Sneakeater

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Posted 05 November 2015 - 03:13 PM

We're going to be in Rome when Roscioli is doing this tasting:

 

here we are with a historical portrait of Trebbiano, Cerasuolo and Montepulciano.

 

 

Valentini. A historic vertical

 

 

Montepulciano in years: 1990, 1994, 1995, 1997, 2006

Trebbiano in years: 1990, 1992, 1995, 1998, 2000, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2010

Cerasuolo in years: 2006, 2009

 

 

Thoughts? It's 90 euros for the tasting and I'm pretty sure there's at least some food involved.

 

Sounds like a really big hangover is inevitable.

 

Well, those are certainly expensive wines.

 

I love the Trebbianos at home -- when I can bring myself to open one.


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