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Congee Village


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#1 cabrales

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Posted 16 January 2005 - 01:44 PM

If members go to Congee Village, one item to consider sampling is the cooking of rice with various ingredients (e.g., preserved duck, which is different from roast duck; alternatively, chicken with salted fish) in a bamboo box. There are at least 5-6 varieties of this dish, and the bamboo does imbue the rice with a certain rich, smoky-almost flavor that is interesting.

#2 jinmyo

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Posted 16 January 2005 - 02:35 PM

That's interesting.

cabrales, are the boxes actually constructed boxes or made from sections of large bamboo?
"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

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#3 cabrales

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Posted 16 January 2005 - 04:19 PM

They are constructed. I doubt there would be that many bamboo with mid-sections large enough to make the boxes.

#4 helena

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Posted 16 January 2005 - 04:48 PM

Do you think that rice is double-steamed? I mean cooked initially, then other ingredients are added and everything is steamed together?
There is a discussion on a similar subject going on eG right now.
I was looking at those cute small bamboo steamers at Marshalls trying to imagine how they could be used so maybe i should get them for individual portioned steamed rice (as well as steamed curry).
"farangs are full of surprises. It's the erudition that impresses her, not the quality of the evidence." Bangkok 8

#5 cabrales

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Posted 16 January 2005 - 04:51 PM

To clarify, this is not rice that has been placed inside a bamboo steamer. This is rice that is in a closed, elongated box made of bamboo that is in direct contact with, and encloses, the rice. This is not steamed rice. It is rice cooked inside a box made of bamboo.

#6 omnivorette

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Posted 16 January 2005 - 04:52 PM

I know this isn't quite related - but I know a woman from Vietnam who has a shop in London - she sells boxes made of cinnamon wood (?) which are amazingly fragrant, and she puts rice in them and lets it sit for a while, and serves the rice that way at the table and the rice gets infused with the cinnamon. Lovely.
"It seems a positively Quixotic quest to defend food from being used as any kind of social signifier, as if it could avoid the fate of each other component of our everyday lives." -Wilfrid

#7 jinmyo

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Posted 16 January 2005 - 04:53 PM

Sounds nice.

Helena, sure, you can line a small bamboo steamer with banana leaf or such.
"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

#8 helena

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Posted 16 January 2005 - 05:23 PM

To clarify, this is not rice that has been placed inside a bamboo steamer.  This is rice that is in a closed, elongated box made of bamboo that is in direct contact with, and encloses, the rice. This is not steamed rice. It is rice cooked inside a box made of bamboo.

cabrales, i perfectly understand this. i'm just coming with the alternatives :rolleyes:
but where i do need clarification is when you say not steamed but cooked what do you mean by this: baked?
"farangs are full of surprises. It's the erudition that impresses her, not the quality of the evidence." Bangkok 8

#9 cabrales

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Posted 16 January 2005 - 05:33 PM

I'm not sure how it was cooked. Perhaps the bamboo box (closed) was steamed. But it's hard to tell. The rice inside definitely didn't have the sense of steamed rice in the conventional sense. It had a cooked aspect that was fairly particular to the bamboo box.

http://www.menupages...Menus/EV057.pdf

Menupages lists the rice as having been "baked in a bamboo pot" (see bottom of second-to-last column).

My dining companion and I spent only $20/person for:
-- Rice in the bamboo box
-- "Typhoon shelter"-style 2 small crabs (flesh was not fresh, but saucing based on very small dried shrimp was appropriate; overall dish was not)
-- Congee, with accompanying fried crullers (sp)
-- Shared shark's fin soup (under $15) -- not appropriate, but this outcome is to be expected given the pricing level

#10 Lippy

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Posted 16 January 2005 - 05:39 PM

It could be a particular kind of rice, too. I found this description on-line:

Bamboo Rice

Aromatic rice from China that is made from short grain white rice which has been infused with the chlorophyll taken from young bamboo plants. As the rice is milled the chlorophyll is added, making the rice high in vitamin B. It is rice that can be served as a risotto, as a sushi rice, as a side dish with fish or pork, or as an ingredient in rice desserts.

The rice in the dish served at Congee Village is definitely a short-grain, almost sticky rice.

#11 Vanessa

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Posted 16 January 2005 - 05:43 PM

I know this isn't quite related - but I know a woman from Vietnam who has a shop in London - she sells boxes made of cinnamon wood (?) which are amazingly fragrant, and she puts rice in them and lets it sit for a while, and serves the rice that way at the table and the rice gets infused with the cinnamon. Lovely.

Ahem?

v
...it actually comes down to what thrills you - Hugh Johnson

authenticity is a fog that recedes just when you think you may be getting near it - R Schonfeld

The most political act we do on a daily basis is to eat - Prof J Pretty

this city without boundaries we all share - zigzackly


#12 omnivorette

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Posted 16 January 2005 - 05:56 PM

http://www.ceramic-m...n_furniture.htm

There's the showroom address, and some photos.
"It seems a positively Quixotic quest to defend food from being used as any kind of social signifier, as if it could avoid the fate of each other component of our everyday lives." -Wilfrid

#13 Vanessa

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Posted 16 January 2005 - 06:03 PM

Thanks. But who knows what 7-9 Kensington, London means :rolleyes:

v
...it actually comes down to what thrills you - Hugh Johnson

authenticity is a fog that recedes just when you think you may be getting near it - R Schonfeld

The most political act we do on a daily basis is to eat - Prof J Pretty

this city without boundaries we all share - zigzackly


#14 omnivorette

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Posted 16 January 2005 - 06:09 PM

Give 'em a call?
"It seems a positively Quixotic quest to defend food from being used as any kind of social signifier, as if it could avoid the fate of each other component of our everyday lives." -Wilfrid

#15 ranitidine

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Posted 16 January 2005 - 06:23 PM

Ah, Congee Village. My introduction to Cathy and Rose (in their former identities), Eyebrows (in his former identity) meets the extended family, Wilfrid gets to the church on time. And to think, it couldn't have been that long ago, really.
"Say not the struggle nought availeth...."
Arthur Hugh Clough, 1819-1861

Arise ye prisoners of starvation
Arise ye wretched of the earth