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Caribbean Food


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#1 joethefoodie

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Posted 30 October 2015 - 12:58 PM

The Times is on it. But it's a "new movement..."

 

 

For decades, New Yorkers have dug into the rice and beans of Dominican diners and the yellow-orange Jamaican beef patties sold at pizzerias.

 

But the diverse queue of customers at the Food Sermon, in a gentrifying neighborhood that has long been home to a vibrant West Indian community, is the latest sign that the next place to spark New York City’s culinary interest may just be the Caribbean, a catchall term for the islands of the West Indies and the Caribbean Sea, as well as coastal countries like Belize and Guyana. More than 1.5 million New Yorkers can trace their roots to the region, where the cooking is often spectacularly bright, complex and flavorful.

 

 

 

 

 



#2 Wilfrid

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Posted 30 October 2015 - 02:41 PM

I haven't read the article yet, but my immediate reaction is that it's like identifying a movement for European food.  There are a number of utterly disparate cuisines in the Caribbean.  Jamaican food is no more like Dominican food than French is like Italian.
 

spectacularly bright, complex and flavorful

 

 

:waffle:



#3 Orik

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Posted 30 October 2015 - 02:50 PM

Caribe laden stodge. 


sandwiches that are large and filling and do not contain tuna or prawns

#4 Wilfrid

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Posted 30 October 2015 - 02:56 PM

Caribe laden stodge.

 
Yep.   :)

#5 GerryOlds

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Posted 30 October 2015 - 03:21 PM

Best piece of news in that article is that Glady's is opening a 4,000 sqft second location.



#6 Sneakeater

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Posted 30 October 2015 - 03:25 PM

I have to go to Glady's, and I'm sure I'll like it.  But I have such a conceptual problem with white people opening an upscaled Caribbean restaurant in Crown Heights.


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#7 Wilfrid

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Posted 30 October 2015 - 03:36 PM

And The Rolling Stones.  :D



#8 Sneakeater

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Posted 30 October 2015 - 03:38 PM

They didn't actually move to Chicago.


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#9 splinky

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Posted 30 October 2015 - 03:52 PM

I have to go to Glady's, and I'm sure I'll like it.  But I have such a conceptual problem with white people opening an upscaled Caribbean restaurant in Crown Heights.

isn't rhode island the caribbean of the northeast?


“One thing kids like is to be tricked. For instance, I was going to take my little nephew to Disneyland, but instead I drove him to an old burned-out warehouse. 'Oh, no!', I said, 'Disneyland burned down.' He cried and cried, but I think that deep down he thought it was a pretty good joke. I started to drive over to the real Disneyland, but it was getting pretty late.”
~Jack Handey

*proud descendant of cheese eating surrender monkeys*

 


#10 Wilfrid

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Posted 30 October 2015 - 03:54 PM

I think my conceptual problem is the broadbrush approach to Afro-Caribbean and Latino cuisines and cultures (within which there are multiple further divisions) being casually lumped together as "Caribbean."



#11 Sneakeater

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Posted 30 October 2015 - 03:59 PM

I don't disagree with you in the least bit.  But note that that article seems to be focusing on Jamaican/Trinadidi(/Guadaloupe/etc.) and Haitian food, and not the more Latino food of the Dominican Republic and Cuba.


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#12 Wilfrid

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Posted 30 October 2015 - 04:13 PM

Yes I agree that's the main thrust.  Not sure why it needs to wave hello to the DR and "Spanish colonists" in passing, and then dive into Puerto Rican food and mofongo at the end.



#13 GerryOlds

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Posted 30 October 2015 - 04:13 PM

I had the exact same thought going in, but some of the food's blessedly affordable. Half jerk chicken for $9, sizable portion of jerk pork for $8.50. The white people who opened it were pretty conscious about trying to appeal to both longtime neighborhood residents and the gentrifiers.



#14 Wilfrid

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Posted 30 October 2015 - 04:44 PM

Those prices aren't bad in the abstract, but I don't believe you'll pay $9 for half a jerk chicken in Jamaican places.  Indeed, you'll get a whole chicken for that (or less) in local Dominican or Jamaican joints.



#15 Wilfrid

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Posted 02 January 2017 - 02:20 PM

I hadn't realized (because I hadn't thought about it) that there was a concentration of casual Caribbean restaurants in Canarsie.  Haitian and Jamaican.  Worth a stroll around.