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Austin--where to eat now?


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#46 Wilfrid

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Posted 27 October 2017 - 02:07 PM

Good tip, thanks.

 

I am forever car-less, of course.



#47 Steven Dilley

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Posted 27 October 2017 - 11:11 PM

I actually could get to Franklin with my schedule next week.  Annoying.

 

I don't see how I'm not getting to Bufalina this time.

 

Micklethwait and La on the BBQ list; possibly Terry Black's.

 

LA BBQ recently moved, and its current setup is a bit more user-friendly.  Very good, as always.  And let me know if you're swinging by.

 

I _still_ need to get out to Snow's.


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#48 Wilfrid

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Posted 29 October 2017 - 01:42 AM

I will be swinging by; just need to figure out which night.

#49 Wilfrid

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Posted 05 November 2017 - 12:33 AM

Micklethwait was good, even very good, but I've still had better brisket (to my taste) at private events. Theirs was incredibly moist and tender, a bit too rich, but not as smoky as I expected. Sausage was excellent.

Drinks: Austin is all in on reservation only cocktail bars. I talked my way into The Roosevelt Room for an hour; had to book ahead and give credit card details for Midnight Cowboy --probably for 1 to 2 drinks. New York started this, right?

#50 Wilfrid

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Posted 05 November 2017 - 12:36 AM

While I'm here, the LBJ Library does a great job of conjuring an era. The Blanton Museum has some worthwhile surprises, although most of the collection is Reina Sofia-style very good minor art.

Bullock museum of State history: grand building. Temporary exhibit on Prohibition would make anyone thirsty.

#51 joethefoodie

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Posted 06 November 2017 - 02:03 PM

I talked my way into The Roosevelt Room for an hour; had to book ahead and give credit card details for Midnight Cowboy --probably for 1 to 2 drinks. New York started this, right?

Yeah, maybe Milk & Honey (or was London first)? I think there was also one in San Francisco, whose name fails me at this time, but was probably after M & H.

 

The Blanton Museum has some worthwhile surprises, although most of the collection is Reina Sofia-style very good minor art.

 

I love that minor Guernica.



#52 Wilfrid

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Posted 21 December 2017 - 05:27 PM

Finally getting the Pink Pig up to date, starting with Austin.



#53 Sneakeater

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Posted 23 December 2017 - 07:01 AM

Reading your response to eating Texas brisket in Texas for the first time, I'm reminded of the bootlessness of the claims that New York is now developing its own style of barbecue, equal in quality to the barbecue of the South, such that New York is now one of the major barbecue centers of the nation.

 

Nobody -- nobody honest, anyway -- who's eaten barbecue in its indigenous regions would ever believe that anything you can get in New York even comes close.

 

I don't think there's something genetic at work here.  And I don't really believe that indigenous cuisines are incapable of transfer to other regions.

 

So something else must be at play here.

 

I hate to say it, but I'm tempted to think that all things we don't like about Southern barbecue -- thinking of Texas in particular, the long waits, the limited availability -- might in fact be necessary to the quality of the product they're able to produce.

 

I hope I'm wrong.


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#54 Suzanne F

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Posted 23 December 2017 - 10:32 PM

Reading your response to eating Texas brisket in Texas for the first time, I'm reminded of the bootlessness of the claims that New York is now developing its own style of barbecue, equal in quality to the barbecue of the South, such that New York is now one of the major barbecue centers of the nation.

 

Nobody -- nobody honest, anyway -- who's eaten barbecue in its indigenous regions would ever believe that anything you can get in New York even comes close.

 

I don't think there's something genetic at work here.  And I don't really believe that indigenous cuisines are incapable of transfer to other regions.

 

So something else must be at play here.

 

I hate to say it, but I'm tempted to think that all things we don't like about Southern barbecue -- thinking of Texas in particular, the long waits, the limited availability -- might in fact be necessary to the quality of the product they're able to produce.

 

I hope I'm wrong.

 

Those things are necessary to the perception of quality--why would anyone wait so long for something that isn't great? the assumption that scarcity = quality--but have nothing to do with the product itself.


I don't actually know what a handbasket is -- but whatever they are, singer-songwriters are in the first ones going to hell. -- Sneakeater, 29 March 2018 - 12:06 AM

 

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#55 Sneakeater

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Posted 23 December 2017 - 10:45 PM

I get that.  But in the particular case at hand, the quality is so obviously, easily perceptibly higher, it isn't a case of convincing yourself of anything.  The difference isn't subtle.

 

Why do YOU think it's so much better?  There's no reason you couldn't make barbecued brisket that good in New York.  It just isn't done, for some reason.


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#56 Anthony Bonner

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Posted 24 December 2017 - 12:21 AM

Lower overheads mean potentially higher quality inputs, lower throughput demand, and a longer break in period to get up the quality curve.

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#57 Wilfrid

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Posted 24 December 2017 - 01:02 AM

New York occasionally produces long waits and running out.

But you're right. The first time I went to Memphis I understood the absolute difference in quality.

#58 Suzanne F

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Posted 24 December 2017 - 04:03 PM

Lower overheads mean potentially higher quality inputs, lower throughput demand, and a longer break in period to get up the quality curve.

 

And maybe also longer experience held by the staff in charge day to day, with the development of greater knowledge of dealing with the vagaries of product, conditions, etc.


I don't actually know what a handbasket is -- but whatever they are, singer-songwriters are in the first ones going to hell. -- Sneakeater, 29 March 2018 - 12:06 AM

 

notorious stickler -- NY Times
deeply annoying and nitpicking -- Molly O'Neill, One Big Table