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Would you eat cricket flour?


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#1 Rail Paul

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Posted 24 March 2016 - 02:26 AM

Bitty foods is based on the principle that people will eat cricket flour, and will like it.

 

The company produces a milled cricket flour, high in protein, and sustainably raised. The flour is used in baking, and in several crackers called Chiridos.

 

 

http://bittyfoods.com/pages/chiridos


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#2 Orik

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Posted 24 March 2016 - 02:43 PM

I see great Arlan Galbraith style opportunity in cricket farming.


sandwiches that are large and filling and do not contain tuna or prawns

#3 Wilfrid

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Posted 24 March 2016 - 04:08 PM

Cochineal still used as a colorant?

#4 Daniel

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Posted 24 March 2016 - 04:57 PM

if only we could find a way to make rat and bed bug powder, the kids from Williamsburg could be farmers. 


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#5 Orik

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Posted 24 March 2016 - 06:17 PM

City Cuy™


sandwiches that are large and filling and do not contain tuna or prawns

#6 Neocon maudit

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 12:43 AM

My co-worker who even lifts has been complaining throughout the week about the ridiculous price of cricket flour [$20 for a quarter-pound bag??].  Ivy Leaguers will sell you ground up insects for $3 per two-ounce bar.  It seems possible to get more protein per pound from chicken and perhaps for less $, even if paying Le Coq Rico prices.



#7 voyager

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 01:36 AM

Bitty foods is based on the principle that people will eat cricket flour, and will like it.

 

The company produces a milled cricket flour, high in protein, and sustainably raised. The flour is used in baking, and in several crackers called Chiridos.

 

 

http://bittyfoods.com/pages/chiridos

Shoot...if you can eat andouillette, cricket flour brownies should be a piece of cake.


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#8 Sneakeater

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 02:36 AM

I just spent a week eating crickets . . . .


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#9 Sneakeater

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 02:36 AM

(OK, grasshoppers.)


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#10 Orik

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 12:36 PM

 When a moderately kosher colleague asked me if there'd be anything for him to eat in Mexico, I don't think he was expecting chapulines as the answer.

 


sandwiches that are large and filling and do not contain tuna or prawns

#11 Josh Karpf

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Posted 26 February 2019 - 02:43 PM

Why Not Eat Insects? by entomologist Vincent M. Holt, 1885

 

https://books.google...epage&q&f=false

 

"How can the farmer most successfully battle with the insect devourers of his crops? I suggest they be collected by the poor as food, thus pleasantly and wholesomely varying their present diet while, at the same time, conferring a great benefit on the agricultural world."

 

With at least one recipe!



#12 Wilfrid

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Posted 27 February 2019 - 12:53 AM

Been a while since I had a good cricket. I think it was at Black Ant. Had ants too, of course.

#13 Sneakeater

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Posted 27 February 2019 - 01:00 AM

Recently at Oxomoco.
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