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#31 Sneakeater

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Posted 06 July 2016 - 05:49 AM

This is going to sound titanically stupid and overblown (and self-pitying), but most weeks I feel like the only thing that gives my life meaning is going to the Greenmarket to shop. I wouldn't give that up for anything.
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#32 joethefoodie

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Posted 06 July 2016 - 12:06 PM

Nothing wrong with that, though you do seem to do a bunch of other things which are meaningful.  Food is life.



#33 Abbylovi

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Posted 06 July 2016 - 01:04 PM

I love greenmarket shopping too and still do it at least once a week. In addition to what I said before, my CSA also allows me to take a long, beautiful bike ride - another one of my great loves.


It is better to have beans and bacon in peace than cakes and ale in fear.

#34 Abbylovi

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Posted 06 July 2016 - 01:05 PM

Oh and any collard recipe recs?


It is better to have beans and bacon in peace than cakes and ale in fear.

#35 Daniel

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Posted 06 July 2016 - 01:57 PM

i want the peanut butter collards on this page

 

http://www.saveur.co...-Greens?image=0


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#36 Suzanne F

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Posted 06 July 2016 - 02:09 PM

Oh and any collard recipe recs?

 

The book I'm working on right now suggest using them in place of tortillas to make burritos. For prep, she says:

 

Cut the thick stems from the collard leaves with scissors or a knife so the leaves look like round tortillas. With a fork, mash the center veins to make them more pliable. (Mashing the center vein is the big secret to collards being awesome wraps.)

 

Personally, I think they could use a very light steaming (or nuking) to soften them, too. Awfully chewy raw.

 

Or you could use them to make kimchi.


I don't actually know what a handbasket is -- but whatever they are, singer-songwriters are in the first ones going to hell. -- Sneakeater, 29 March 2018 - 12:06 AM

 

notorious stickler -- NY Times
deeply annoying and nitpicking -- Molly O'Neill, One Big Table


#37 rozrapp

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Posted 06 July 2016 - 04:24 PM

There was a restaurant here, Millesieme (I'm blanking on the name--near Madison Square, in a hotel, well-known French chef; they featured Oakapple's review in their literature; closed now) that did a Ceasar salad with grilled romaine, possibly grilled red romaine? I was skeptical, but it was delicious.

 

ETA: I remembered the name!

 

Millesime (note the correct spelling) is still open.  It's in the Carlton Hotel, on the corner of Madison Ave. & 29th St.  The grilled romaine is still on the menu. 

 

The restaurant in the Carlton that closed was the formal one whose name escapes me though I'm sure we can count on oakapple to remember it.



#38 Suzanne F

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Posted 06 July 2016 - 04:48 PM

Thanks for the corrections. That grilled romaine was surprisingly good.


I don't actually know what a handbasket is -- but whatever they are, singer-songwriters are in the first ones going to hell. -- Sneakeater, 29 March 2018 - 12:06 AM

 

notorious stickler -- NY Times
deeply annoying and nitpicking -- Molly O'Neill, One Big Table


#39 rozrapp

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Posted 06 July 2016 - 05:11 PM

I love doing grilled romaine.  A restaurant near our house does a fabulous Southwestern Grilled Caesar Salad that I use as a jumping off point.   



#40 memesuze

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Posted 06 July 2016 - 07:21 PM


 
Cut the thick stems from the collard leaves with scissors or a knife so the leaves look like round tortillas. With a fork, mash the center veins to make them more pliable. (Mashing the center vein is the big secret to collards being awesome wraps.)

 
Personally, I think they could use a very light steaming (or nuking) to soften them, too. Awfully chewy raw.
 
Or you could use them to make kimchi.[/quote]

Tried them raw once. As Suzanne says, chewier than I wanted for a wrap. May try again with a bit of nuking/steaming.
"When you think about it, all of my greatest work is poop tomorrow." - Mario Batali

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#41 Suzanne F

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Posted 06 July 2016 - 07:26 PM

You could also use them instead of cabbage leaves in stuffed cabbage--but that's not really a dish for this weather. (OTOH, using chard leaves lightens it considerably, but that's not what you asked for advice about.)


I don't actually know what a handbasket is -- but whatever they are, singer-songwriters are in the first ones going to hell. -- Sneakeater, 29 March 2018 - 12:06 AM

 

notorious stickler -- NY Times
deeply annoying and nitpicking -- Molly O'Neill, One Big Table


#42 Suzanne F

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Posted 06 July 2016 - 10:10 PM

Same book has instructions for collard chips: Tear leaves into chip-size pieces, toss with olive oil, spread on baking sheets, bake at 300ºF for 18 minutes until crisp.


I don't actually know what a handbasket is -- but whatever they are, singer-songwriters are in the first ones going to hell. -- Sneakeater, 29 March 2018 - 12:06 AM

 

notorious stickler -- NY Times
deeply annoying and nitpicking -- Molly O'Neill, One Big Table


#43 Abbylovi

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Posted 08 July 2016 - 02:20 PM

Thanks for the collard suggestions.

 

Fennel frond ideas besides pesto and using as you would use dill?


It is better to have beans and bacon in peace than cakes and ale in fear.

#44 splinky

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Posted 08 July 2016 - 02:43 PM

my nana used to make a casserole with grits and collard greens, definitely rib sticking. i'd probably deconstruct that and stew the greens and serve over grits (the real coarse kind, not the instant). cooking your grits and your greens in stock rather than water adds a nice lift in the flavors


“One thing kids like is to be tricked. For instance, I was going to take my little nephew to Disneyland, but instead I drove him to an old burned-out warehouse. 'Oh, no!', I said, 'Disneyland burned down.' He cried and cried, but I think that deep down he thought it was a pretty good joke. I started to drive over to the real Disneyland, but it was getting pretty late.”
~Jack Handey

*proud descendant of cheese eating surrender monkeys*

 


#45 splinky

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Posted 08 July 2016 - 02:46 PM

Thanks for the collard suggestions.

 

Fennel frond ideas besides pesto and using as you would use dill?

dampen them and wrap them around fish before grilling or baking in foil/parchment respectively


“One thing kids like is to be tricked. For instance, I was going to take my little nephew to Disneyland, but instead I drove him to an old burned-out warehouse. 'Oh, no!', I said, 'Disneyland burned down.' He cried and cried, but I think that deep down he thought it was a pretty good joke. I started to drive over to the real Disneyland, but it was getting pretty late.”
~Jack Handey

*proud descendant of cheese eating surrender monkeys*