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Alain Senderens

Nouvelle Cuisine

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#1 paryzer

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Posted 27 June 2017 - 02:56 AM

Legendary French chef Alain Senderens passed away at the age of 77. He was credited with creating Nouvelle cuisine and also food & wine pairings.

 

http://www.grubstree...s-has-died.html


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#2 balex

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Posted 27 June 2017 - 08:39 AM

Back in the day Lucas Carton was terrific. I remember vividly a meal there a long time ago of ravioli de petoncles (small scallops or canestrelle in Italian, what are they in English?) and the duck Apicius.

 

And for old times sake I went back to the restaurant on the same site a few years ago and it was ghastly in every way.



#3 Anthony Bonner

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Posted 27 June 2017 - 01:12 PM

I think in America we'd call them bay scallops no?

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#4 Orik

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Posted 27 June 2017 - 02:09 PM

More complicated because in France any sort of scallop can be a pentocle as oppsed to coquilles st jacques, but usually when pentocles are served with pride then they're the little ones.


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#5 Wilfrid

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Posted 27 June 2017 - 04:24 PM

Significant figure. Was he one of the first chefs to consciously dial back the three star experience in favor of something more (by that standard) casual?



#6 paryzer

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Posted 27 June 2017 - 09:01 PM

Grubstreet has a nice tribute.

 

"A decade later, nouvelle cuisine took hold, defined by its lighter, more graceful approach to cooking. The movement was led by the “Three Musketeers” — Michel Guérard, Alain Chapel, and the Troisgros brothers (they counted as one) — who considered Senderens the fourth. Plates trended toward less baroque presentations, and chefs unfriended butterfat in all forms; an entire meal at Archestrate might have involved two sauces, total, neither one fussy. “To eat you must kill — a cow, a chicken. And if you then kill the primary matter by overcooking or overdosing with sauce, you’re a double assassin — you’re killing an animal and, ultimately, killing a man with empty calories,” Senderens once told the New York Times.

After consulting trips to Japan and India, Senderens soon loosened the knot on the traditional French larder, too, employing ingredients like lemongrass and curry powder. The experimentation was so expertly calibrated that Henri Gault and Christian Millau — who founded the influential Gault Millau restaurant guide — called Senderens the “Picasso of French cooking,” which didn’t seem like much of a stretch, considering the persistent rumor that Salvador Dalí once offered the chef a painting in exchange for meals."

"In 1985, Senderens took over Lucas Carton, where he had apprenticed from 1963 to 1965. There, he made one of his biggest contributions to the world of fine dining: offering wine pairings for each menu item (the lobster with vanilla went with a Côte de Beaune Meursault). In truth, the chef had been handpicking wines to pair with multi course meals for VIP guests for years, but three months after their official launch, about 80 percent of all diners opted for them. Three decades later, the idea of carefully selected pairings seems obvious. In the 1980s, it was seismic."

 

http://www.grubstree...ch-cooking.html


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