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Making yogurt, descending heat method


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#1 voyager

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Posted 23 September 2017 - 09:48 PM

Recently on Chow, Ptipois described this utterly simple way to make yogurt.   Last night, in an ongoing program of showing our grandgirls that much of what you buy in packages and jars can be made at home, often better:   

 

Water is set to boil in a heavy lidded pot, like enameled iron or similar.     Milk is brought to a simmer and left to cool until you can hold your finger in it for 10 seconds.   Add a spoonful of commercial yogurt to the milk and mix well.  Empty water from pot and place small jars in it.       Fill jars.   Replace pot lid.   Place pot on a folded blanket and wrap snugly.    Leave until it has cooled to room temp.  We left it overnight.   The yogurt will be somewhat creamy but will set up more as it cools more in the refrigerator.    

 

I used whole organic milk (1 qt) and organic plain yogurt (1 teaspoon).    DELICIOUS product.    Stupid easy.   The hardest part is folding up and putting away the blanket or comforter.    

 

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#2 Rail Paul

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Posted 23 September 2017 - 11:48 PM

Thanks for the recipe.

 

The Instant Pot has a setting for making yogurt, I'm not sure what it does.  Maybe create a gradually descending temperature.


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#3 Orik

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Posted 23 September 2017 - 11:55 PM

There's no need for descending temperature, just a constant temperature around 110F, this is just the troglodyte version.


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#4 voyager

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Posted 24 September 2017 - 12:18 AM

That was precisely the point.   You don't need a special yogurt maker, a thermometer or any means keep a constant temperature.   Of course this is the troglodyte method.  That you don't need any fancy tools make this ancient food.   


It's not my circus,

not my monkeys.


#5 prasantrin

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Posted 24 September 2017 - 12:30 AM

FWIW, when I used to use the slow cooker method, I found using a thick polar fleece jacket worked really well in lieu of towels or a blanket. 



#6 Orik

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Posted 24 September 2017 - 01:06 AM

That was precisely the point.   You don't need a special yogurt maker, a thermometer or any means keep a constant temperature.   Of course this is the troglodyte method.  That you don't need any fancy tools make this ancient food.   


Yes, I know. In the old days you'd have a heavy pot, blankets, supermarket yogurt... just not a thermometer.

If you want something more interesting and as ancient, start by making or buying yogurt, then mix it about 4:1 with semolina or fine bulgur and some salt and leave on the counter. Mix daily for about two months and then place under a weight to strain until it's hard as a rock. You now have Kishk, which will easily last you the nomadic desert winter and offer as much umami when ground over food as you get from bonito flakes. Cheesy too.
sandwiches that are large and filling and do not contain tuna or prawns

#7 voyager

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Posted 24 September 2017 - 01:09 AM

One more time, your thick polar fleece jacket might have sufficed without using your slow cooler. This is about showing kids (and us) about simplicity.

It's not my circus,

not my monkeys.


#8 voyager

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Posted 24 September 2017 - 01:10 AM

That was precisely the point.   You don't need a special yogurt maker, a thermometer or any means keep a constant temperature.   Of course this is the troglodyte method.  That you don't need any fancy tools make this ancient food.   

Yes, I know. In the old days you'd have a heavy pot, blankets, supermarket yogurt... just not a thermometer.

If you want something more interesting and as ancient, start by making or buying yogurt, then mix it about 4:1 with semolina or fine bulgur and some salt and leave on the counter. Mix daily for about two months and then place under a weight to strain until it's hard as a rock. You now have Kishk, which will easily last you the nomadic desert winter and offer as much umami when ground over food as you get from bonito flakes. Cheesy too.

It's not my circus,

not my monkeys.


#9 voyager

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Posted 24 September 2017 - 01:10 AM

That was precisely the point.   You don't need a special yogurt maker, a thermometer or any means keep a constant temperature.   Of course this is the troglodyte method.  That you don't need any fancy tools make this ancient food.   

Yes, I know. In the old days you'd have a heavy pot, blankets, supermarket yogurt... just not a thermometer.

If you want something more interesting and as ancient, start by making or buying yogurt, then mix it about 4:1 with semolina or fine bulgur and some salt and leave on the counter. Mix daily for about two months and then place under a weight to strain until it's hard as a rock. You now have Kishk, which will easily last you the nomadic desert winter and offer as much umami when ground over food as you get from bonito flakes. Cheesy too.

It's not my circus,

not my monkeys.


#10 voyager

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Posted 24 September 2017 - 01:41 AM

I somehow can't post outside Ori's response so I'll start over.    re needing supermarket yogurt, like sourcing sourdough starter, you just have to text a couple of people before finding a lead on someone who has yogurt culture.  

 

And no, I'm not trying to resurrect ancient foods or methods   Only trying to show some very young girls that life does not depend on Whole Foods.    As much as getting this across to them, their epiphany in making pasta, bread and, yes, yogurt, staples in their lives, is a joy,  

 

It's as much about showing them the occasional "magic" in food preparation.   Bread rising.   Choux paste exploding into enormous puffs.   Cream turning to butter.   And, yes, milk becoming yogurt.    I had warned her last night before we went to bed that it might not work.   Her first words to me this morning were, "Let's go see if the milk turned into yogurt."   

 

And that you don't always need a high tech way to create any of these.   They get enough of that at home.


It's not my circus,

not my monkeys.


#11 Orik

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Posted 24 September 2017 - 02:57 AM

show them how to build a micro controller  ;)


sandwiches that are large and filling and do not contain tuna or prawns

#12 prasantrin

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Posted 24 September 2017 - 03:17 AM

One more time, your thick polar fleece jacket might have sufficed without using your slow cooler. This is about showing kids (and us) about simplicity.

  

I was just commenting that a polar fleece was, for me, more convenient than a blanket or towel. Smaller, less cumbersome, and no need for wrapping. Just pull over!



#13 joethefoodie

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Posted 24 September 2017 - 12:57 PM

I gotta go buy some yogurt.

 

And kishk.



#14 Suzanne F

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Posted 24 September 2017 - 02:26 PM

I'm just puzzling over the phrase "descending heat method." Since the puffy jacket/blanket/towel/whatever is meant to maintain the level of heat close to the optimal temperature as long as possible and prevent it from falling too fast, why is it not called "conserving heat"?

 

[I understand that it's Ptipois who used the term and Voyager is only repeating it; I don't blame Voyager for this inapt euphemism for "cooling." Is it a bad translation from the French?]


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#15 voyager

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Posted 24 September 2017 - 03:53 PM

Agreed. But it also suggests the difference from yogurt makers that maintain a constant temperature for a fixed time.

It's not my circus,

not my monkeys.