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Making yogurt, descending heat method


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#16 Behemoth

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Posted 25 September 2017 - 02:35 PM

Mm, kishk. Why haven't I tried yogurt yet In the combi oven? (I did finally use it for preserves, after overbuying a bunch of stuff this summer.)
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#17 Ptipois

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Posted 28 May 2019 - 05:38 PM

Agreed. But it also suggests the difference from yogurt makers that maintain a constant temperature for a fixed time.

 

That's exactly the point. The temperature is not constant. It's pretty high at the beginning, the idea is to have it decrease slowly, hence the blanket and thick vessel. In French the method is called "chaleur descendante". There is no fixed time — generally the yogurt will be ready in 4 to 6 hours, but if you wait longer, it's OK and even firms up in the cold vessel.

In the same manner I make crystal-boiled chicken, same heavy cast-iron cocotte, boiling water + aromatics, drop chicken in it, cover, boil for 5 minutes, take off heat, wrap in blanket and wait until the water is just lukewarm. 3-4 hours. Best chicken ever and incredible stock, too. That method even improves a not-perfect chicken.


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#18 voyager

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Posted 28 May 2019 - 06:14 PM

Thanks for revisiting crystal boiled chicken.    This is one of those recipes so simple that I always have to look it up to make sure I'm not missing something.    Will try this method next time.


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#19 joethefoodie

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Posted 29 May 2019 - 11:05 AM

Thanks for revisiting crystal boiled chicken.    This is one of those recipes so simple that I always have to look it up to make sure I'm not missing something.    Will try this method next time.

The "crystal boiled chicken" I remember from some of the first cookbooks (of Chinese cuisine) I owned - called white-cut chicken, I believe, in some of those books...I could never really believe that a whole chicken could be poached in water that was essentially cooling down, but indeed, it's a great method.