Jump to content


Photo

Impossible Burger


  • Please log in to reply
54 replies to this topic

#1 Daniel

Daniel

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 13,559 posts

Posted 07 November 2017 - 04:03 PM

For the better part of three months, I have been a vegan..  What started out as a quest to make the perfect cheeseburger, left me vegan and now eating these sort of things... 

 

Without doing a book report about it, there are two major "plant based meat" companies that are extremely well funded and trying to create a synthetic ground beef.. The beyond burger and the impossible burger.. While Beyond has been relatively accessible, impossible burger has been extremely limited.. I believe Momofuku was the first restaurant, then this horrific burger chain called Bareburger was one of the first places one could go and eat one of these burgers at  an approachable price point.  Unfortunately, the two times I went to bareburger, they cooked the shit out of the burger and it was rendered tasteless and dry.. 

 

Within the last week, i received an email stating that Pat Lafrieda will be distributing this item.. I was also told that Sysco and Chef's Warehouse will now be distributing the Impossible Burger.. Super excited, i ordered a sample in order to see what was doing.. 

26465406979_7cd285c031_c.jpg

 

I was given them in preformed patties. 

 

26465405889_54f9c7dd51_c.jpg

 

They certainly looked real enough.. And the initial raw taste, well, I think I actually like it better than when it's cooked.. Not that it's bad when it's cooked but, the umami, the mushroom, the richness sort of fades away once it is cooked.. My next attempt with be a tartare of some sort.. The texture, the taste, it is all much more like beef when it is raw, as opposed to being cooked.. 

 

I turned on my griddle and threw down some oil and onions in order to give it some onion taste and some steam... 

37530669024_bf7d400a9b_c.jpg

 

This was the patty taken off the griddle

26465551439_8c6041ed01_c.jpg

 

Simply dressed, i wanted to taste the flavor.. 

 

Unfortunately, i over cooked it and it was rather dry the flavor muted. 

 

26465400259_ecc9358cf1_c.jpg

 

My next idea was to do the smash burger method.. However, I kept it thicker and made it a square shape.. I cooked it at a higher temp with less time.. I built the char and kept it medium rare in the center.. 

 

 

 

37530667534_e2b4740a11_c.jpg

 

 

Got the char on the one side and moderate on the other.. 

 

38186887576_cf327298cf_c.jpg

 

Since I am vegan, i didn't add cheese.. I added a spicy hummus, raw onions, tomato and arugula. But, impossible burger definitely needs accouterments.. I think a spicy carrot hummus would be ideal.  

38189166556_21d136d28e_c.jpg

 

As you can see, it has a medium rare texture and more of the taste.. Still not as much as when it was raw.. But, certainly a satisfying sandwich... The first time I ate a veggie burger in a long time and didn't feel like I was eating a poor version of a falafel. 

 

38186886186_3e648e5ef7_c.jpg

 

All in all, i was very impressed.. Again, the fondest memory of meat I had was when I ate it raw.. I will most likely make a tartar tonight.. to serve it on crostini, it's exciting to think about..   To have a hot fresh sandwich alternative as a vegan, it's also exciting.. It blows morning star and all of the pre-frozen patties out of the water..  

 

With just two passes at it, I am excited to see how else it can be improved upon or what it can be turned into.. Meatballs sound good, so do a few other ideas... Looking forward to adding soy sauce and cumin or curry, or a whole host of spices and toppings to the sandwich.. 


Ason, I keep planets in orbit.

#2 joethefoodie

joethefoodie

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 10,509 posts

Posted 07 November 2017 - 07:47 PM

And you have a problem with sous vide, huh?



#3 Daniel

Daniel

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 13,559 posts

Posted 07 November 2017 - 08:00 PM

I mean, if you tell me I can should the sub par preparation of food in order to get some health benefit outside of making it easier for the chef, I would be open to hear it..    :P


Ason, I keep planets in orbit.

#4 joethefoodie

joethefoodie

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 10,509 posts

Posted 08 November 2017 - 12:00 PM

Just make sure you read the label instructions on that package, Daniel - at least before you serve it to any customers!

 

What, exactly, are the health benefits of:

 

textured wheat protein

potato protein

soy protein isolate

leghemoglobin

Konjac gum

Xanthum gum

 

I know water is good for you. But how is the above better for you than a perfectly sous-vide cooked piece of line-caught wild striped bass, or a 36-hour sous-vide cooked short rib?



#5 Lex

Lex

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 23,867 posts

Posted 08 November 2017 - 04:12 PM

 

What, exactly, are the health benefits of:

 

textured wheat protein

potato protein

soy protein isolate

leghemoglobin

Konjac gum

Xanthum gum

 

 

Frankenburger!


"I don't understand what's wrong with thinking of correlation as a pricing convention the way one thinks of Black-Scholes vol. I mean, vol curves aren't "real" anyway, but nobody uses local vol models to price vanilla options." - Taion
 
"But this is blatant ultracrepidarianism on my part." - Taion

I have a dream of a multiplicity of pastramis.

"once the penis came out, there was discussions as to why we didn't order the testicles" - Daniel describing a meal in China

#6 Daniel

Daniel

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 13,559 posts

Posted 08 November 2017 - 04:54 PM

Imagine what they inject into 

 

Just make sure you read the label instructions on that package, Daniel - at least before you serve it to any customers!

 

What, exactly, are the health benefits of:

 

textured wheat protein

potato protein

soy protein isolate

leghemoglobin

Konjac gum

Xanthum gum

 

I know water is good for you. But how is the above better for you than a perfectly sous-vide cooked piece of line-caught wild striped bass, or a 36-hour sous-vide cooked short rib?

 

1)leghemoglobin-Leghemoglobin (also leghaemoglobin or legoglobin) is a nitrogen or oxygen carrier and hemoprotein found in the nitrogen-fixing root nodules of leguminous plants.

 

2)Konjac gum-Konjac gum is made from the root of the konjac plant

 

 

Seems like some really scary stuff- 


Ason, I keep planets in orbit.

#7 joethefoodie

joethefoodie

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 10,509 posts

Posted 08 November 2017 - 09:05 PM

Textured wheat protein is produced utilizing twin-screw extrusion technology. This method uses a proprietary mix of wheat gluten and other processing additives to yield customized products that differ in size, shape and color. While textured soy protein is considered to be the dominant product for meat extension and vegetarian products, textured wheat protein is gaining notoriety for its improved taste and textural properties in these applications, as well as in snack and cereal innovations.

 

Yummo.

 

More on leghemoglobin; not necessary as benign as made out above.

 

And of course, that delicious, super-healthy, soy protein isolate!

 

There are actually a few different ways to make soy protein isolate, but the most common way is pretty disturbing.  Through a process called hexane extraction, the fats are separated from the soybean. This hexane bath the soybeans soak in is actually super dangerous.

Hexane is a gasoline byproduct that is extremely explosive. The USDA has also labeled it as a neurotoxin. In fact, the USDA won’t even allow for its use in organic foods. Sadly though, non-organic foods that contain soy still use the hexane extraction method.  Once the fats are removed from the soybean, it’s then soaked in an ethanol or an acidic bath to remove carbohydrates and any lingering flavor. The final result is the 90 percent soy protein isolate you get in your non-organic protein powders.



#8 Anthony Bonner

Anthony Bonner

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 13,955 posts

Posted 08 November 2017 - 09:29 PM

I think they also use Hexane to extract THC (as well as most bulk veg oils)


"This is a battle of who blinks first, and we've cut off our eyelids"


#9 mitchells

mitchells

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 8,341 posts

Posted 08 November 2017 - 09:54 PM

It would really suck dying early while trying to eat healthy. https://www.eater.co...er-fda-approval



All are lunatics, but he who can analyze his delusions is called a philosopher.
Ambrose Bierce

#10 Orik

Orik

    Advanced Member

  • Technocrat
  • PipPipPip
  • 21,164 posts

Posted 08 November 2017 - 11:21 PM

There are probably no health benefits as you're still getting 15% fat, almost all of it saturated, still getting as much salt, and you end up eating a "blood" and fat soaked bun in your bun. 

 

But maybe if you're vegan you benefit from not adding mayo  :D


sandwiches that are large and filling and do not contain tuna or prawns

#11 joethefoodie

joethefoodie

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 10,509 posts

Posted 09 November 2017 - 02:05 PM

There are probably no health benefits as you're still getting 15% fat, almost all of it saturated, still getting as much salt, and you end up eating a "blood" and fat soaked bun in your bun. 

 

But maybe if you're vegan you benefit from not adding mayo  :D

 

This is what I'm trying to point out.  If, as Daniel seems to be, you're going vegan for the "benefits," then just avoid the garbage trying to pretend it's meat.

 

Re: THC extraction - stick with buds, make your own butter or Green Dragon, if you must.



#12 Daniel

Daniel

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 13,559 posts

Posted 09 November 2017 - 02:33 PM

I am vegan for several reasons. One for the weight benefits, one to learn the market, one to teach myself a new cooking language and lastly to reset my pallet. Health sure, I guess but maybe last on my list
Ason, I keep planets in orbit.

#13 Suzanne F

Suzanne F

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 21,903 posts

Posted 09 November 2017 - 02:47 PM

It's a tiny sample, but: my long-time vegan friends get pretty angry about analog foods. They remember what the real things taste like. They know these analogs don't match that. One in particular, after getting a tour of a factory where one brand is manufactured,* said, "It's pretty good--for what it is. But it's not any better for you than the real thing."

 

*Make no mistake: analog foods are made in factories. They are the antithesis of eating fresh, real food. They are not "natural" regardless of what root extracts, manipulated starches, and test-tube meat go into them. I don't say they are harmful, because I can't know, and I doubt the people who manufacture them know the long-term effects of some of their ingredients. But I can not imagine that with all the stuff thrown into them to make them taste kinda sorta like what they are meant to replace, they could taste as good as a good version of the real thing.

 

 

Daniel: you want "weight benefits"? Eat less of your usual diet, and drink less alcohol.


I don't actually know what a handbasket is -- but whatever they are, singer-songwriters are in the first ones going to hell. -- Sneakeater, 29 March 2018 - 12:06 AM

 

notorious stickler -- NY Times
deeply annoying and nitpicking -- Molly O'Neill, One Big Table


#14 Daniel

Daniel

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 13,559 posts

Posted 09 November 2017 - 05:19 PM

I get it, i understand.. If an impossible burger is a cheat for someone, it is a huge improvement over eating industrial grade beef.. Much worse chemicals and pesticides and poison and ammonia go into a filthy burger patty, not to mention the suffering and torment and the environmental factors.. If this is someone's cheat meal go get them..

 

I am not singularly looking for weight benefits, i am saying, i seriously feel a hundred times better being a vegan than my old ways.. I have slowly gone back to eating meat once or twice a month or as I see fit, a taste of a new cheese or whatever but, compared to my old style of eating, it can't compare..  Not to mention,  my goal is to make new exciting and delicious menu items for everyone.. The vegan market is small and growing and filled with people willing to throw down some serious cash.. 

 

I am sitting on an airplane right now.. The pot cookie I ate was most likely not vegan so I may have cheated but, at the same time, I also had the Hindu Vegan meal as opposed to eating some franken chicken that lived perhaps the most horrible existence on the planet..   

 

Would i rather eat a grass fed beautiful piece of ground beef from a cow that got happy endings all day and was shouted words of affirmation from the farmer every morning over an Impossible Burger?  Of course I would.. And I don't have an ethical eating disorder.. So, I may eat that burger once a month or so. (though in actuality, i am averaging less than that)  But, for people who are morally opposed, who are allergic, who are religiously opposed, this is the best alternative out there right now.. 

 

I know how to lose weight but, when you are vegan, you can literally eat all day and still lose weight and feel great.. At this point, it's still fun and fresh and interesting.. The second it gets boring or toilsome, I am outta here.. 


Ason, I keep planets in orbit.

#15 Daniel

Daniel

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 13,559 posts

Posted 09 November 2017 - 05:29 PM

interesting facts that I just copied and pasted and didn't research and decided to call facts as it helps me look like I care.. Also, i would rather do this than wear those ugly Tom shoes. 

 

 

I’ve written extensively on the consequences of eating meat - on our health, our sense of “right living”, and on the environment. It is one of those daily practices that has such a broad and deep effect that I think it merits looking at over and over again, from all the different perspectives. Sometimes, solutions to the world’s biggest problems are right in front of us. The following statistics are eye-opening, to say the least.

If everyone went vegetarian just for one day, the U.S. would save:

● 100 billion gallons of water, enough to supply all the homes in New England for almost 4 months;

● 1.5 billion pounds of crops otherwise fed to livestock, enough to feed the state of New Mexico for more than a year;

● 70 million gallons of gas—enough to fuel all the cars of Canada and Mexico combined with plenty to spare;

● 3 million acres of land, an area more than twice the size of Delaware;

● 33 tons of antibiotics.

If everyone went vegetarian just for one day, the U.S. would prevent:

● Greenhouse gas emissions equivalent to 1.2 million tons of CO2, as much as produced by all of France;

● 3 million tons of soil erosion and $70 million in resulting economic damages;

● 4.5 million tons of animal excrement;

● Almost 7 tons of ammonia emissions, a major air pollutant.

My favorite statistic is this: According to Environmental Defense, if every American skipped one meal of chicken per week and substituted vegetarian foods instead, the carbon dioxide savings would be the same as taking more than half a million cars off of U.S. roads. See how easy it is to make an impact?


Ason, I keep planets in orbit.