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Scenesters have ruined dining out


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#1 paryzer

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Posted 01 April 2018 - 01:37 PM

Steve Cuozzo grumbles about how these 'scenesters' have to get to the latest publicized restaurant first, and have ruined dining out for the real food lovers, (even though they don't give a damn about the food). He blames sites like Eater for overhyping these restaurants months before they even open.

 

'People are suckers for lists, and the impetus to check out restaurants on “heat” and “power” rosters before the crowd moves on drives dining habits more than reviews or traditional word-of-mouth. Publicists now spend more time wooing blog editors hoping they will include their clients on the lists than they do promoting chefs. (“It takes the joy out of the job for me,” a publicist friend who didn’t dare being named told me.) Restaurants, meanwhile, play hard-to-get for ordinary customers, knowing they’ll put up with anything to say, “Been there, ate that.”

 

https://nypost.com/2...33155-719092275



#2 Lex

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Posted 01 April 2018 - 03:05 PM

All true, but it's been true for more than 5 years.


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#3 Suzanne F

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Posted 01 April 2018 - 03:43 PM

All true, but it's been true for more than 5 years.

:gold:


I don't actually know what a handbasket is -- but whatever they are, singer-songwriters are in the first ones going to hell. -- Sneakeater, 29 March 2018 - 12:06 AM

 

notorious stickler -- NY Times
deeply annoying and nitpicking -- Molly O'Neill, One Big Table


#4 hollywood

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Posted 01 April 2018 - 03:46 PM

All true, but it's been true for more than 5 years.

Amen.


Then that happened.


#5 paryzer

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Posted 01 April 2018 - 04:18 PM

All true, but it's been true for more than 5 years.

Which is about as long as eater.com has been inexistence ;)



#6 Sneakeater

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Posted 01 April 2018 - 04:45 PM

I think you'd be surprised how long Eater has been around.
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#7 paryzer

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Posted 01 April 2018 - 05:25 PM

I know. I was just joking. I just think that Eater and social media influencers are some of the biggest catalysts in ruining the dining experience for serious diners trying to get tables at these overhyped restaurants. Millennials are more concerned about being seen at the latest ‘it’ place, then about the actual food and service (or overall dining experience).

#8 Sneakeater

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Posted 01 April 2018 - 06:44 PM

Totally agree.
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#9 GerryOlds

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Posted 01 April 2018 - 08:37 PM

Does anyone know anyone who acts or thinks like this?

 

Turkish chef Nusr-Et’s salt-spewing, Instagram stardom made his self-named Midtown steakhouse a “must” for those who can’t face their friends without selfies they took there. To some people, a lousy iceberg lettuce salad’s $25 tab is a bargain to avoid friends sneering, “You haven’t been? Loser!”

 

This is why I always wait a few weeks before checking out new restaurants.

 

ETA: and I might think twice about calling someone my friend if they hold such strong, condescending opinions about something so trivial.



#10 Suzanne F

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Posted 01 April 2018 - 10:11 PM

But they say it with such affectation.


I don't actually know what a handbasket is -- but whatever they are, singer-songwriters are in the first ones going to hell. -- Sneakeater, 29 March 2018 - 12:06 AM

 

notorious stickler -- NY Times
deeply annoying and nitpicking -- Molly O'Neill, One Big Table


#11 voyager

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Posted 01 April 2018 - 11:16 PM

In my world, we call those acquaintances.   


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#12 Daniel

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Posted 02 April 2018 - 01:44 PM

I think I have been doing the practice for so long where I don't go to the hottest new restaurants that, I have such a long list of restaurants I still need to try.   I don't need some dude to rub his forearm salt all over my steak.. I understand the writer's upset as it's his job to review the newest places but, this is a non issue for me.. I am not looking to go to the hottest places.  I rarely agree with the heat maps.   It might describe what is the hottest room and who's PR company has paid a website the most but, that rarely translates to enjoyable food..


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#13 Behemoth

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Posted 02 April 2018 - 02:26 PM

I like to try one or two new places whenever I'm stateside, to get an idea of what's new in the US. This time we were at Rose's Luxury (not new) and Little Pearl in DC, and Res Ipsa in Philly. Zahav is booked out for weeks, for years now. I suspect while some of the problem is millennial scenesters, another part of the problem is bored olds with discretionary income, like us. 


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#14 joethefoodie

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Posted 02 April 2018 - 02:33 PM

I like to try one or two new places whenever I'm stateside, to get an idea of what's new in the US. This time we were at Rose's Luxury (not new) and Little Pearl in DC, and Res Ipsa in Philly. Zahav is booked out for weeks, for years now. I suspect while some of the problem is millennial scenesters, another part of the problem is bored olds with discretionary income, like us. 

I'd add, for instance in Philadelphia, that there aren't all that many new places to try. And Zahav, being considered very good to excellent, will maintain its status as a tough table.



#15 Daniel

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Posted 02 April 2018 - 02:33 PM

I like to try one or two new places whenever I'm stateside, to get an idea of what's new in the US. This time we were at Rose's Luxury (not new) and Little Pearl in DC, and Res Ipsa in Philly. Zahav is booked out for weeks, for years now. I suspect while some of the problem is millennial scenesters, another part of the problem is bored olds with discretionary income, like us. 

Pretty much, any place outside of NYC, if you show up after 9:30, they will sit you.. I feel like places outside of New York, like to say they are booked a lot more than they are.. I was quoted two hour waits over the phone, while sitting in the restaurant I was calling, with many empty seats around me,  having just walked in to the restaurant and been quickly seated at a place in Baltimore. 

 

We rarely even make reservations anymore, we just show up.. We did that with Zahav, not too long ago.. Just got there at 930, we waited like 5 minutes for a table. 


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