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Carbonara Day


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#1 cinghiale

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Posted 06 April 2018 - 05:09 PM

Yes, there seems to be a day for everything. And yes, the origin stories of the thing being commemorated are often spurious or downright far-fetched. But this theory in today's Messagero caught my eye [my translation]: "According to Aidepi [Italian pasta-makers association], carbonara dates back to 1944, when Italian pasta was wedded with K-ration ingredients (powdered egg yolks [?] and bacon) that Americans brought with them when they landed several months earlier. It seems that K-rations take their name from Ancel Keys, who 'discovered' the Mediterranean diet a few years earlier." So, the GIs were the originators of carbonara AND pizza, apparently.

#2 Steve R.

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Posted 06 April 2018 - 08:06 PM

Yes, there seems to be a day for everything. And yes, the origin stories of the thing being commemorated are often spurious or downright far-fetched. But this theory in today's Messagero caught my eye [my translation]: "According to Aidepi [Italian pasta-makers association], carbonara dates back to 1944, when Italian pasta was wedded with K-ration ingredients (powdered egg yolks [?] and bacon) that Americans brought with them when they landed several months earlier. It seems that K-rations take their name from Ancel Keys, who 'discovered' the Mediterranean diet a few years earlier." So, the GIs were the originators of carbonara AND pizza, apparently.

 

But not, as I understand it, puttanesca.


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#3 Nathan

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Posted 06 April 2018 - 09:33 PM

We had a massive fight on this forum a decade ago over the origin of carbonara.  I was pitching the GI theory and some were adamantly opposed.  (Today, I don't have the foggiest clue.)


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#4 Orik

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Posted 06 April 2018 - 10:57 PM

And it remains as wrong now as it was then. (and the more people have it at Roscioli the less likely they are to believe it has anything to do with bacon and eggs)


sandwiches that are large and filling and do not contain tuna or prawns


#5 joethefoodie

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Posted 07 April 2018 - 04:40 PM

I may be a heretic, but I am not a big fan of carbonara, and have never ordered it, at Roscioli or anywhere else. Gricia, amatriciana, and cacio e pepe (but not Roscioli's either!) - sure.

 

Carbonara theory.

 

Clifford Wright



#6 Suzanne F

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Posted 07 April 2018 - 07:13 PM

I had a terrible version in Rome (Trastevere) many years ago. But it could just have been because it was the tail end of lunch, and they were not happy that we were there. Way undercooked spaghetti, curdled eggs.


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#7 Orik

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Posted 07 April 2018 - 08:34 PM

I may be a heretic, but I am not a big fan of carbonara, and have never ordered it, at Roscioli or anywhere else. Gricia, amatriciana, and cacio e pepe (but not Roscioli's either!) - sure.
 
Carbonara theory.
 
Clifford Wright


I was converted, and I'm not particularly into pasta

sandwiches that are large and filling and do not contain tuna or prawns