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Whatever Happened To Popular Entertainment?


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#1 Wilfrid

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Posted 06 June 2018 - 02:59 AM

The thread for ventriloquists, impressionists, mimes, conjurers, novelty dance acts, and Stanley Unwin.

#2 Wilfrid

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Posted 06 June 2018 - 03:08 AM

As Sneak said on the Surrealism thread, some us are old enough to see a world of entertainment disappearing over the horizon as new worlds appear.

Can I kick this off with Sooty?

Sooty was a glove puppet (a small bear). His creator, Harry Corbett, had no ventriloquism skills. Sooty never said a word. Think Harpo Marx. He had a foil, Sweep the dog, who had some sort of in-built squeak.

For decades--decades--Corbett built the Sooty empire. Stage shows, TV, books, records, Sooty puppets (did Sooty ever do radio???). A household name in the U.K. through the 60s to the 80s. Sooty allegedly played the xylophone and recorded with big dance bands. This is true.

And when Harry could glove puppet no longer, he passed the dynasty onto his son Matthew.

I adored Sooty when I was a kid (yes I had a puppet), and later was endlessly amused by the sheer insouciant gall of the whole enterprise.

I'm sure there's plenty on YouTube. Is there a US analogy?

#3 voyager

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Posted 06 June 2018 - 03:44 AM

I think the thread title should be something like "Do you remember.....?" rather than "Whatever happened to...?".    We all know quite well what happened to or more accurately what replaced these homely entertainments.     


It's not my circus,

not my monkeys.


#4 hollywood

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Posted 06 June 2018 - 04:27 AM

You can revisit some popular entertainment on Decades when they show portions of the Ed Sullivan Show.  In addition to rockers and other musicians, he had jugglers, acrobats, puppets, ventriloquists, magicians, comics, dog acts, etc.


Then that happened.

 

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Who packing avocado toast like Mario Batali--Black Thought


#5 Wilfrid

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Posted 06 June 2018 - 05:26 AM

Glove puppets, though?

I suppose Lamb Chop was a sock puppet, but with the ventriloquism.

#6 joethefoodie

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Posted 06 June 2018 - 11:02 AM

Great balloon folders? 



#7 Wilfrid

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Posted 08 June 2018 - 01:50 PM

Oh right.  People used to get on TV with their balloon folding skills.



#8 Wilfrid

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Posted 08 June 2018 - 01:52 PM

In the UK, close-up magic used to be popular.  Not the big illusions, which are all the rage these days, but card tricks and other sleights of hand.  David Nixon was the big TV conjurer.  Penn & Teller can do all that stuff, of course, but audiences demand spectacle.



#9 Orik

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Posted 10 June 2018 - 04:19 AM

Uri Geller, just the name makes my teaspoons cower.
sandwiches that are large and filling and do not contain tuna or prawns

#10 hollywood

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Posted 10 June 2018 - 05:01 AM

In the UK, close-up magic used to be popular.  Not the big illusions, which are all the rage these days, but card tricks and other sleights of hand.  David Nixon was the big TV conjurer.  Penn & Teller can do all that stuff, of course, but audiences demand spectacle.

Hence, David Copperfield.


Then that happened.

 

I traveled to Tijuana to smack the federali

Who packing avocado toast like Mario Batali--Black Thought


#11 Wilfrid

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Posted 10 June 2018 - 10:23 PM

Uri Geller, just the name makes my teaspoons cower.


Wasn't that phenomenon amazing? Fucker just bent the spoons. Quickness of hand scarecly deceived the eye.

#12 Wilfrid

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Posted 10 June 2018 - 10:27 PM

Posting did make me curious as to whether the Copperfields can do the intricate close-up stuff. Teller can of course.

#13 Wilfrid

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Posted 10 June 2018 - 10:30 PM

Comedy dance acts? That might be a European thing. You had Ray Bolger parodying idiomatic dance styles, which he had obviously mastered. But anyone who was on TV just for funny dances?

I can post U.K. examples.

#14 small h

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Posted 10 June 2018 - 11:17 PM

Uri Geller, just the name makes my teaspoons cower.

 

When Joan Rivers was a late night host, Geller came on and asked viewers to set their broken items atop the tv, and he would fix them with psychic energy. I had a camera (an Olympus OM-F, if you're interested) that had ceased to function when I fell in the ocean while holding it - the shutter was stuck open. So I put it on top of the tv. And Uri Geller did some concentrating. And damned if the camera's shutter didn't snap shut. Coincidence? Probably, but a pretty weird one. The camera worked for about another year.



#15 Orik

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Posted 11 June 2018 - 01:24 AM

Those shows exhibited a healthy understanding of statistics, mechanics, and human nature on Geller's part, having removed the risk of failure inherent in Chan Canasta's earlier TV work from the equation.
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