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Limoncello


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#1 Evelyn

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Posted 22 December 2018 - 05:32 AM

So, my Meyer lemon trees have gone crazy with fruit this year. And, aside from doing preserved lemons, I want to make limoncello. Does anyone have a good recipe? I've found a couple I thought would work. But, tried and true is better.

 

And, if anyone has any other ideas (aside from the aforementioned, or Meyer lemon jam), I'd like to hear them.

TIA.



#2 AaronS

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Posted 22 December 2018 - 06:34 AM

there’s a nice simple pasta sauce in the franny’s book.

#3 joethefoodie

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Posted 22 December 2018 - 11:38 AM

Jealous of your Meyer lemon bounty, Evelyn!

 

I'd try them in almost any recipe calling for lemons; how bad could they turn out, unless you need the super acidity of a Eureka. But I might start with a lemon curd, lemon sorbet, candied lemon, lemon chicken, etc. etc. I'm sure Sunset has any number of appropriate recipes. Or how about a simple lemon posset? This recipe is from the PBS web site, but originated (I'm pretty sure) with Cook's Illustrated  America's Test Kitchen. Upon further investigation, it was in the March/April, 2016 issue of Cook's Illustrated. It certainly (when I've made it) is delicious with supermarket lemons:

 

Lemon Posset with Berries

 

Ingredients
  • 2 cups heavy cream
  • ⅔ cup (4⅔ ounces) granulated sugar
  • 1 tablespoon grated lemon zest plus 6 tablespoons juice (2 lemons)
  • 1½ cups blueberries or raspberries
Directions
  1. Combine cream, sugar, and lemon zest in medium saucepan and bring to boil over medium heat. Continue to boil, stirring frequently to dissolve sugar. If mixture begins to boil over, briefly remove from heat. Cook until mixture is reduced to 2 cups, 8 to 12 minutes.
  2. Off heat, stir in lemon juice. Let sit until mixture is cooled slightly and skin forms on top, about 20 minutes. Strain through fine-mesh strainer into bowl; discard zest. Divide mixture evenly among 6 individual ramekins or serving glasses.
  3. Refrigerate, uncovered, until set, at least 3 hours. Once chilled, possets can be wrapped in plastic wrap and refrigerated for up to 2 days. Unwrap and let sit at room temperature for 10 minutes before serving. Garnish possets with berries and serve.
Tips/Techniques

This dessert requires portioning into individual servings. Reducing the cream mixture to exactly 2 cups creates the best consistency. Transfer the liquid to a 2-cup heatproof liquid measuring cup once or twice during boiling to monitor the amount. Do not leave the cream unattended, as it can boil over easily.

 

A story, and paraphrasing Sneak, as if anyone cares: One of the rental homes I lived in during my San Jose years had 2 Meyer lemon trees in the backyard. They were gorgeous, and the scent in the early evenings was amazing, but being a New Yorker, I didn't know much about them. My first attempt at picking a few lemons ended with me skewering a finger; those trees had some major thorns, and if you're not careful, oy.

 

Additionally, one winter we had a pretty hard frost.  The trees dropped like 60 - 70% of their fruit, and boy, was that a friggin' mess.



#4 Anthony Bonner

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Posted 22 December 2018 - 01:04 PM

When life give you Meyer lemons, make lemon curd.

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#5 voyager

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Posted 22 December 2018 - 03:30 PM

When life give you Meyer lemons, make lemon curd.


YES! This https://www.seriouse...eam-recipe.html is my go-to. Incredible.

Also always put up a couple of jars of preserved lemons.

It's not my circus,

not my monkeys.


#6 StephanieL

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Posted 22 December 2018 - 10:49 PM

Our dwarf Meyer lemon tree is also producing like crazy.  N has made lemon posset many times.  Today, she made a lemon-spice "visiting" cake (the recipe was in the NYT Magazine earlier this year); you could also make a lemon curd pie.


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#7 voyager

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Posted 23 December 2018 - 09:18 PM

 

Additionally, one winter we had a pretty hard frost.  The trees dropped like 60 - 70% of their fruit, and boy, was that a friggin' mess.

 

 

Several years ago, it dropped to an amazing 28F here.   One huge Meyer tree went to the Great Citrus Grove in the Sky.   We did everything to revive it but it was too much for it.   If only I'd soaked it down the night before, but it never occurred to me.


It's not my circus,

not my monkeys.