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94 year-old Lucca Ravioli Delicatessen closing


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#1 voyager

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Posted 29 January 2019 - 11:55 PM

http://www.sfweekly....ng-up-for-sale/

 

Where you also go for the best priced Parmesan Regianno; meat, porcini or plain "gravy" ladled into cartons; coteghino; pigs feet; ricotta salata, bulk biscotti.    Well chosen and priced esoteric Italian wines and bitters.   And a miriad other Italian deli product.  Turnover guaranteed freshness.    SRO mid-day as the neighborhood + lined up for humungous hero sandwiches.    Also a cross-town outpost for Liguria Bakery focaccia.    

 

Such a loss.    Sure, we have Whole Foods....


It's not my circus,

not my monkeys.


#2 StephanieL

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Posted 30 January 2019 - 09:34 PM

I don't know what's worse, that a nearly 100-year-old business is closing or that the family decided to kill it for money.  At least Glaser's Bake Shop in NYC (founded before WWI) closed simply because the owners wanted to retire.


"Socialism never took root in America because the poor see themselves not as an exploited proletariat but as temporarily embarrassed millionaires." --John Steinbeck

 

"Insanity runs in my family.  It practically gallops."--Arsenic and Old Lace

 


#3 greenspace

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Posted 30 January 2019 - 11:31 PM

heaven forbid a family, successful in business for a century on razor thin margins, decides to see a better return on their investment while they can still enjoy it. i'm sure their raison d'etre for years was to not make money.


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#4 voyager

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Posted 31 January 2019 - 12:16 AM

It's not unusual to have the final generation realize that they are not willing to work like their parents for a modest lifestyle.    Their folks, born in, what, 1930?, have carried on the family business, learning and maintaining tradition, raising (EDUCATING) kids.    It's very unusual to have these young people want to take on these hours AND modern urban restrictions and taxation for their dad's salaries.    Heck, they can't even afford to buy a HOUSE in SF.   

 

I HATE this closure, as I have so many businesses that have not found willing progeny to take over.   But I do understand their choices.  


It's not my circus,

not my monkeys.