Jump to content


Photo

Duck


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 Wilfrid

Wilfrid

    Advanced Member

  • Admin
  • PipPipPip
  • 86,025 posts

Posted 08 April 2019 - 10:30 PM

I wish we could stop undercooking duck. Most of the misery from the duck breast restaurant dishes of the last 12 months has been the kitchen’s insistence on serving it rare or medium rare (even though I now request medium). The result, a rubber ball, with those indigestible stringy pieces for which there must be a biological term.

I cook medium or beyond at home, which makes it more tender, and although it changes the flavor, doesn’t do so in a bad way. (I can get my blood and iron fix from more suitable meats.)

What made me think of this again was cooking duck legs yesterday. I gave the skin a stove-top sear, then put in a hot oven for 40 minutes. They were still pale rubber balls. I turned the oven down and left them for another hour plus. Result: crisp mahogany skin, rendered fat, fork-tender meat.

Most of this goes for lamb too (see Joe’s Paris post), but I admit it’s easier to eat rare. (Two notes: very high quality magrets are exempt; and raw duck, which I’ve eaten as a ceviche, isn’t a problem - not that problem, anyway).

#2 voyager

voyager

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 5,430 posts

Posted 08 April 2019 - 11:21 PM

In my experience, wrong duck has = overcooked breast and under-cooked legs.   Lamb kind of the same.   Overcooked loin and under-cooked shoulder and feet.   This shouldn't rock one's logic nor stretch the kitchen's ability to cook each in the way that makes/keeps it succulent..


It's not my circus,

not my monkeys.


#3 joethefoodie

joethefoodie

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 11,351 posts

Posted 09 April 2019 - 04:16 PM

I wish we could stop undercooking duck. Most of the misery from the duck breast restaurant dishes of the last 12 months has been the kitchen’s insistence on serving it rare or medium rare (even though I now request medium). The result, a rubber ball, with those indigestible stringy pieces for which there must be a biological term.

I cook medium or beyond at home, which makes it more tender, and although it changes the flavor, doesn’t do so in a bad way. (I can get my blood and iron fix from more suitable meats.)

When I was going out to dinners with a food critic of a certain age, she always requested her dining partners order stuff rare, if it was able to be ordered that way...fish, duck, lamb - you get the picture.

 

I learned early on to order braised or other long cooked dishes. Some stuff just needs to be cooked a little more. 

 

But how one can undercook duck legs without knowing they're fucking up is beyond me.



#4 Orik

Orik

    Advanced Member

  • Technocrat
  • PipPipPip
  • 21,792 posts

Posted 10 April 2019 - 04:16 PM

aged, small and gamey -> raw breast with just a sear on the fat. Alternatively if you're a poacher, a very gentle poach of slices. 

 

fresh, big, and bland -> medium with plenty of rendering, maybe complete removal of the fat. 

 

Legs well done, for sure. 

 

The silverskin, similarly, more important in some breeds than others. And if you've learned your duck butchery stateside you're in for a surprise when you cut through your eurobreast and find that vein full of blood you were supposed to remove. 


sandwiches that are large and filling and do not contain tuna or prawns

#5 Wilfrid

Wilfrid

    Advanced Member

  • Admin
  • PipPipPip
  • 86,025 posts

Posted 10 April 2019 - 05:00 PM

I knew there was a better name for those stringy pieces -- which well-known New York kitchens are not trimming.



#6 CheeseMonger

CheeseMonger

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 825 posts

Posted 08 May 2019 - 12:03 AM

I made duck last night for dinner, and had a similar thought. Also, despite employing the google, I haven't received a satisfactory explanation as to why is rare duck is "okay" when rare chicken is well known to be a big no.



#7 Orik

Orik

    Advanced Member

  • Technocrat
  • PipPipPip
  • 21,792 posts

Posted 08 May 2019 - 01:04 PM

Duck is raised for rich people and rich people don't like getting salmonella. If ducks were raised and processed under the same price constraints as chicken, it'd be equally unsafe to eat raw.
sandwiches that are large and filling and do not contain tuna or prawns

#8 Wilfrid

Wilfrid

    Advanced Member

  • Admin
  • PipPipPip
  • 86,025 posts

Posted 09 May 2019 - 02:47 AM

The salmonella I got was from a chicken, and I don’t recommend it.

I’ve eaten raw duck (which is better than under cooked duck) as a “ceviche.” I think that’s vaguely relevant, not sure why.

#9 Sneakeater

Sneakeater

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 63,802 posts

Posted 09 May 2019 - 04:19 AM

Duck Salmi. Nearly raw. (Great.)
Bar Loser

MF Old