Jump to content


Photo

Shun


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 Seth Gordon

Seth Gordon

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 158 posts

Posted 12 October 2019 - 05:28 PM

Hm.

Well, that was less than exciting.

Perfect execution for the most part.

Perfectly... whatever.

Perhaps it was simply what we ordered, but the rumors of Japanese notes/influences/ingredients proved mostly untrue. Arguably the most Japanese thing about the meal was the clientele, which seemed to be around 80% last night.

With a couple exceptions, the plates were pretty standard Nouvelle Française. Which probably needs a new name at this point since it hasn’t been “nouvelle” in decades.

There were flashes: a lovely seaweed bread. A miso brioche, with no discernible miso but at least the attempt. Overall the breads were quite good - and I like the idea that each course has its own unique accompanying bread, rather than one bread course pre-apps.

Most everything was quite good. But not terribly interesting. At that price - a four course dinner is the same $$$$ as Le Bernardin - I kind of expect to be wowed by something.

Sure, (mostly) perfect execution. Big fucking deal. Technique is about as common as pigeons in NYC in 2019. What are you using those skills towards?

Uni & Fennel app was great. Probably the high point.

Foie gras was certainly a generous portion. Paired with sweetened fruits. Maybe a touch too sweet. Nothing we haven’t seen before. Also served a few degrees too cold. Also had a vein. Which I personally don’t particularly care about, but at their prices come on...

Cod was the standard white fish with buerre blanc & caviar we’ve seen before. Only with sake instead of white wine. Point for trying, but minus a point for it not actually being a good choice. Without the wine’s acidity to cut through it rendered the whole thing a bit meh. It could have been water, not sake in there for all it mattered. Note to chef: try that again, with a dashi instead. Something that adds a layer of flavor?

Lobster with Chestnuts and mushroom... nice enough. Had this before too. Hell, I’ve made this. The lobster wasn’t particularly sweet or luscious, but that was more the lobster’s fault than the kitchen’s. Oddly, the two seafood dishes - ostensibly “entrees” - were about half the size of the appetizers.

Meat entrees... the duck seemed like they just took the foie course, replaced the protein, and added a baby turnip. Duck and fruit. This is supposedly a signature dish? I mean, do something with it for chrissakes. Make a yuzu marmalade instead of orange. Work some green tea or soy into it. Something. Show me why you gave your restaurant a Japanese name.

Lamb was very nice, with a not-spicy harrisa for a little French-Moroccan note. Not Japanese but at least reaching to parts elsewhere.

Odd service hiccup, the SO just wanted the cheese course for dessert. Fine. They brought it out, and brought (only me) a pre-dessert to eat while she grazed. Then five minutes later they brought out my dessert. That was awkward. Why did only I get a pre-dessert? How difficult would it have been to bring two pre-desserts, then the cheese plate and my chocolate mishegas at the same time?

Cheese plate was nice.

Chocolate dessert was... nice.

It was all... nice.

I don’t spend $200+/pp before wine for “nice” though. Eh.

Speaking of wine, I do appreciate they have a small but decent half-bottle selection. Sure, the mark-up would make a certain regular poster here have a heartattack. But that’s part of the game. That said, the champers we overpaid for was unfamiliar to me, and fascinating, with notes of caramelized pineapple, and I was glad to have made its acquaintance. I’ll for sure be purchasing the lower priced yet larger sized home edition at the one local wine shop I could find it.

Were there other dishes that might have shown more Japanese influence? Maybe. I’m not locking in to a rigidly structured prix fixe again to find out though.

Would I go back if there were a la carte options? Maybe. There were things among the apps that piqued my curiosity. I noticed Benno recently switched from PF to ALC. Maybe that would work better for Shun too.

I suppose I’ll have to compare it at some point to Mifune. Perhaps a Japanese chef making French-influenced Japanese food will be more interesting than this French chef making (ostensibly) Japanese-influenced French food.

#2 Orik

Orik

    Advanced Member

  • Technocrat
  • PipPipPip
  • 21,956 posts

Posted 12 October 2019 - 09:31 PM

Well the chef was running Robuchon's 3 star wedding hall in Tokyo for 20 years, so you might expect producing very boring, not Japanese at all*, Robuchon food is what he'd know.

 

As an aside, I think I interviewed five people from that place (the Tokyo restaurant I mean) and they were all dickwads. 

 

* Because a fancy wedding at a French chateau in the middle of Tokyo is exactly about it being not Japanese at all.


sandwiches that are large and filling and do not contain tuna or prawns

#3 Seth Gordon

Seth Gordon

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 158 posts

Posted 12 October 2019 - 11:25 PM

Well the chef was running Robuchon's 3 star wedding hall in Tokyo for 20 years, so you might expect producing very boring, not Japanese at all*, Robuchon food is what he'd know.

As an aside, I think I interviewed five people from that place (the Tokyo restaurant I mean) and they were all dickwads.

* Because a fancy wedding at a French chateau in the middle of Tokyo is exactly about it being not Japanese at all.


If only they’d named the restaurant “Dude who worked for Robuchon makes French stuff” and not played up the Japanese business at every possible turn. Bah, I call false advertising.

Nice room, though. The bar has a sleek “Tom Ford Would Seduce A Model Here” kind of vibe, right down to Grace Jones and ambient Blondie remixes on the soundtrack. If it had existed in the late 80s it would have been one of Patrick Bateman’s go-to date restaurants.

#4 Tubbs

Tubbs

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 427 posts

Posted 13 October 2019 - 01:17 AM

The wine list pissed me off. Agree about the food. Except for the uni toast and corn soup everything was great but unmemorable. Weird how the chef spent 80% of the time staring (angry/bored-looking) into the dining room. The bar area looked very useful.

#5 Tubbs

Tubbs

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 427 posts

Posted 13 October 2019 - 01:19 AM

Also the tasting menu is a bit of a rip and they were pushing it pretty hard. We just ordered 4 courses each and got in total the same courses. Everything was plenty big to each have a few bites. (the duck portion was actually huge)

#6 Orik

Orik

    Advanced Member

  • Technocrat
  • PipPipPip
  • 21,956 posts

Posted 13 October 2019 - 03:21 AM

 

Well the chef was running Robuchon's 3 star wedding hall in Tokyo for 20 years, so you might expect producing very boring, not Japanese at all*, Robuchon food is what he'd know.

As an aside, I think I interviewed five people from that place (the Tokyo restaurant I mean) and they were all dickwads.

* Because a fancy wedding at a French chateau in the middle of Tokyo is exactly about it being not Japanese at all.


If only they’d named the restaurant “Dude who worked for Robuchon makes French stuff” and not played up the Japanese business at every possible turn. Bah, I call false advertising.

Nice room, though. The bar has a sleek “Tom Ford Would Seduce A Model Here” kind of vibe, right down to Grace Jones and ambient Blondie remixes on the soundtrack. If it had existed in the late 80s it would have been one of Patrick Bateman’s go-to date restaurants.

 

 

It's probably complicated for InvestHospitality as they only own the Atelier franchise, not the three star one, so they have to try and create their own high end brand. 


sandwiches that are large and filling and do not contain tuna or prawns