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Shad Roe


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#31 Lippy

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Posted 19 April 2004 - 05:22 PM

I think it's a different species on your side of the pond. Ours is American shad. The fish flesh is very delicate and it has a very complex bone structure and only very well-trained and experienced fishmongers are able to filet it properly. If the fish were to be exported whole, there would be no one able to filet it anyway, and it is simply not eaten bone-in, despite the numerous recipes involving long, slow cooking that claim to "dissolve" the bones.

The roe is even more delicate than the fish -- like uni. I guess that shad could be exported, if very special care were taken, but it would be prohibitively expensive. [For some people, that, of course, would add to its appeal.]

#32 Kikujiro

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Posted 19 April 2004 - 06:48 PM

Waiter, bring me shad roe :(
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#33 Vanessa

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Posted 19 April 2004 - 07:37 PM

The French have shad (alose à l'oseille), so no reason why we shouldn't.

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#34 omnivorette

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Posted 19 April 2004 - 09:10 PM

Well just roe roe roe your boat on over there.
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#35 g.johnson

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Posted 26 February 2005 - 05:24 PM

For those interested, Citarella (Village location) are advertising shad roe.
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#36 Wilfrid1

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Posted 28 February 2005 - 06:57 PM

It seems early, maybe because it is still snowing, but thanks for the alert.
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#37 Daisy

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Posted 28 February 2005 - 07:05 PM

For those interested, Citarella (Village location) are advertising shad roe.

And as of Saturday anyway, Citarella still had amazingly sweet and delicious Nantucket bay scallops. Season ending any day now........
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#38 Maurice Naughton

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Posted 02 March 2005 - 07:56 PM

Here in France, shad (and Vanessa has is right, it's "alose") is reported to teems i the rivers Loire and the Gironde in the spring, But is it the same shad? I'm going hunting for shad roe in Paris, and if anyone can help me, I'd melt a stick of butter just for him. (I'm not an unregenrerate sexist, just an old-fashioned grammarian, but one who tolerates and even sometimes approves the modernist movement.

As an aside, I feel like mentioning that another roe, called boutargue (aka poutargue and in Italian Bottargha, but I may be way off on that), mullet roe, salted and pressed (to remove a lot of moisture) stares out at me from four or five different producers next to kippers and smoked salmon and tuna and trout and haddock on the prepared fish shelves at the Intermarché supermarket, a stone's throw from my front door.

A chunk of it six to seven inches long and about three and a half wide, half an inch thick, sells for about 60 Euros, near 85 bucks US. In a neighborhood supermarket, where you can throw half-a-dozen in your grocery basket and file for bankruptcy. There's nothing else in the meat and fish department that comes anywhere close to being this expensive. I'd like to sit on the floor in front of the display and find out who buys it. If it doesn't turn over, they don't stock it. That's why they dropped kangaroo, the manager told me.

Anyone have any comment on why this delicacy is so damned expensive? What you do with it? And who, in the 12th Arrondissment, outrageously business and working- -class buys enough of it for Intermarché to make it available every day, from a selection of producers. Big mystery to me. :blush:
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#39 Orik

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Posted 02 March 2005 - 08:01 PM

Anyone have any comment on why this delicacy is so damned expensive? What you do with it? And who, in the 12th Arrondissment, outrageously business and working- -class buys enough of it for Intermarché to make it available every day, from a selection of producers. Big mystery to me. :blush:

Italians and some north african immigrants, no doubt. You use it in fairly small quantities (grated over pasta, for instance), so the effective price per serving doesn't end up being all that high. This is the saving grace of gray mullet - an otherwise poor fish.
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#40 Wilfrid1

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Posted 02 March 2005 - 08:09 PM

Bottarga, as I know it (Spanish I think) is wonderful stuff, as is the similarly preserved tuna roe (mojama). It can be grated over salad as well as pasta (San Domenico in New York always offers a salad kicked up with bottarga), but both kinds of roe are also served in Spain as tapas. You just get some thin slivers, and some toothpicks. Much prized. Expensive, but believe me - you do not need a lot of it.
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#41 Kim

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Posted 02 March 2005 - 08:10 PM

I am lucky enough to live here, the shad capital :

http://www.newhopepa...lle/default.htm

Every Shad fest brings out great shad and shad roe creations from the many restaurants along the Delaware.

#42 mongo_jones

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Posted 02 March 2005 - 08:13 PM

recently purchased a package of pollack roe from the local korean-japanese superstore. harbored all kinds of fantasies of making bizarre fusion dishes worthy of the french laundry with it but in the end just ended up making roe pakodas. very yummy, but i'm left wondering if pollack roe could be substituted for other kinds of roe in italian dishes etc. anyone?

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#43 mongo_jones

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Posted 02 March 2005 - 08:20 PM

the uber fish of bengal is hilsa/ilish, a kind of shad. the mark of a bengali is to be able to eat ilish without being done in by the bones. this is the fish that goes best with the mustard paste sauce. what we do with ilish deem (eggs/roe) often looks like this (and this is what i did with the pollack roe today as well): cut into pieces, sprinkle with a little turmeric, salt and red chilli and roll to coat. you could then just fry them as is. or you could (as i did today) then take a bowl with some gram flour with more powdered spices mixed into it and roll the pieces again in it to coat fully--then deep fry till just firm in the middle. yummy stuff. 2 huge lobes of yummy pollack roe are $3.79 per packet at the local hanh ah reum. my ilish eggs i get out of the bellies of the whole frozen ilish i buy at the local pakistani store.

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#44 Vanessa

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Posted 02 March 2005 - 08:23 PM

I add my voice in praise of bottarga - one of the food wonders of the world for those who like caviar and related tastes and worth every penny when it is at its best. I can't raise the same enthusiasm for the tuna version.

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authenticity is a fog that recedes just when you think you may be getting near it - R Schonfeld

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#45 Wilfrid1

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Posted 02 March 2005 - 08:28 PM

I haven't tried breading or battering shad roe. Good idea. In addition to the usual quick braises in cream and white wine with bacon and herbs. :blush:
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