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#16 Behemoth

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Posted 02 June 2005 - 01:47 AM

I love long bike rides. Before our move, I used to do the Philly to Valley Forge ride every once in a while. That was nice, about 50 miles round trip. I heard they were planning to extend it to Harrisburg. For a 25 mile round trip, I could go halfway, to Manayunk, and get brunch or water ice, then be home in time to get work done. I did that quite frequently. It's rails to trails though, so pretty flat. Riding down Kelly drive by the river into the city in the late afternoon has to be one of the most beautiful ways to experience Philadelphia.

Where I live now is so small I am in the middle of a cornfield in 30 minutes. I don't feel safe riding on the back country roads because of the trucks. So the farthest I can go on trails, with some double-back, is about 30 miles. I was riding around a lot last year, and I might start again, but I got kind of bored of the same scenery all the time. Flat flat flat, corn, corn, cow, corn corn flat. Silo.
Summarizing, then, we assume that relational information is not subject to a corpus of utterance tokens upon which conformity has been defined by the paired utterance test.
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#17 GG Mora

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Posted 02 June 2005 - 02:19 PM

23 miles yesterday afternoon, after another extended hiatus. Did our favorite scenic-loop-with-long-climbs and added a 6-mile jughandle with a monster climb. I did that hill once, thirteen years ago, and “touched down” (fuck it, I'll walk) about half way up. Been avoiding it ever since, but yesterday I was feeling bold. It's about a 2.5 mile climb, mostly about a 12% grade, but relents to about 8 or 9% in two short spots. I gutted it out, meditating on my breathing, only pushing about 2 mph in spots, but I did it without stopping. The rest of the jughandle was a downhill fly. In spots along the ride, the air was potent with the smell of lilacs and apple blossom. All in all a great ride.

I used to get frustrated that the riding around here is SO hilly, and wish for a flat route on occasion. Last summer, me and Mr. GG went up to the Champlain islands & did a nice flat 35-miler...and we were bored shitless. So we climb.

#18 GG Mora

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Posted 02 June 2005 - 02:21 PM

As a cycling commuter (only 20 minutes each way) in Sydney, I'm loving my new lights (yesterday was the first day of winter and it's dark when I leave work at 5). The front one has about 4 blueish LEDs which flash like mad, and the rear one has tons of LED's and a great 'Eagle Wing' setting. Its great when you feel visible.

I do occasionally take pity on drivers who have got me in their rear-view mirrors and turn the flashing off. In general though, I think that flashing is much more noticable than a constant beam.

Roger that. And if the flashing confuses the drivers, all the better. They're more apt to give you a wide berth (what the hell is that thing?).

#19 callalla

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 02:53 AM

Went to hop on my bike to work today and -puncture. Why is it always the back wheel? Really though, I can't complain as I haven't had one for over a year, and that's with use almost every day on roads with glass and all sorts of crap. Some of my fellow cycling commuters swear by "Mr Tuffy' or some other thing that stops puncturing - does anyone have any tips?

The question is, is it a slow enough puncture that I can get to work on it, and then walk it up to my lovely cycling shop in town to be fixed? Or should I stop being such a lazy moll and do it myself?

#20 g.johnson

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 01:17 PM

Some of my fellow cycling commuters swear by "Mr Tuffy' or some other thing that stops puncturing - does anyone have any tips?

Is this the plastic tape that you place inside the tyres? It seemed to cut down on the number of punctures I had when I cylced in NYC.

The question is, is it a slow enough puncture that I can get to work on it, and then walk it up to my lovely cycling shop in town to be fixed? Or should I stop being such a lazy moll and do it myself?

Take it to the shop. Life's too short to fix punctures yourself.
The Obnoxious Glyn Johnson

#21 yvonne johnson

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 01:40 PM

My cousin has been given a Guggenheim Fellowship "to research the bicycle in world culture".
It was not a new dish, as I recognised my tooth marks. Wilfrid

#22 Lippy

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 01:47 PM

No doubt necessitating bicycling in a lot of exotic locales?

#23 g.johnson

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 01:50 PM

My cousin has been given a Guggenheim Fellowship "to research the bicycle in world culture".

Remarkable given his pedestrian scholarship.
The Obnoxious Glyn Johnson

#24 yvonne johnson

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 01:56 PM

So you won't be going to the bookreading?

Hmmm, not so sure on the exotic locales. I think it'll be theoretical and involve hegemony, empire and enclosure, and bitter class struggles. That kind of thing.
It was not a new dish, as I recognised my tooth marks. Wilfrid

#25 bushey

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 02:26 PM

Remarkable given his pedestrian scholarship.

:) :( :D

#26 GG Mora

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Posted 03 July 2005 - 04:56 PM

27-mile tour of the neighborhood yesterday, on the dirt-surfaced back roads that connect one village to the next, instead of on the paved two-lanes that conveniently follow the valleys. The dirt roads are the ones that offer the best rural riding, the quiet byways, the beautiful high views and, uh, the quality climb. I have yet to map the ride, but I'd estimate the overall elevation gain at close to 3,000 ft. I was dead last night.

Also, my maiden voyage in my new Ibex wool cycling jersey. Yup, I said wool. It's astoundingly comfortable – breathes much better than the spun plastic I normally wear and, once damp from a good climb, doesn't freeze me on the ride down (and doesn't stink afterward). Highly recommended.

#27 tanabutler

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Posted 03 July 2005 - 05:04 PM

You're insane, Mora. How am I supposed to get my vicarious thrills about your garden or dinners when you're doing these death-seeking torture rides?

#28 GG Mora

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Posted 03 July 2005 - 05:52 PM

Correction: +4,171 ft.

Butler: that pano-view of Monterey Bay is nothing to sneeze at.

#29 molecule

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Posted 24 July 2005 - 02:56 AM

I've always liked to ride a bike. I got my 1st when I was seven and rode it everywhere. Somewhere several years later I got a full size bike and used to ride from my Apt in Washington Hts (NYC) to my JHS in the bronx (Mosholu Pkway). It had one speed, and brakes that you applied by backpedaling. One day, in high school, it was swiped out of the bike room in the basement. No more biking.

When I moved to Ill after college, I got another bike. This one had gears! I forget how many - not a lot, but more than 3. And handle brakes. It was still fun to ride out there, but I never felt quite as in control with brake cables and shifting.
I brought it back with me to NYC after 3 years out there and kept it for another four. I moved back to Wash Hts, so I used to ride it to and through the Cloisters and even across the GWB and back.

(I am not in the GG category of rider)

Then moved in with wife to be. She wasn't keen on dirty bicycle tires touching any floor surface. So, ropes and pulleys. Between the elevator and having to hoist the bike up and down each time it just wasn't fun anymore. Gave it away.

Flash forward 15 years. Have climbed out of a lot of life ruts. New career. Wanted a bike. Shrink says I'm on a "quest for youth." What's wrong with that? Bought a bike upstate at a flea mkt for $55. After $130 tuneup and some new parts at Toga Bikes, it rides nicely. 21 speed no name with fat tires, index shifting.
Did 11 mile roundtrip from Linclon Center to the Little Red Light House. Flat terrain. Little detour at the uptown Fairway. Nice.

Yes, you don't forget, but it doesn't seem as natural yet as it did in the old days. Why with my 30" inseam do I have to raise my saddle so high in the air to get the proper leg stroke? Is my bike frame small? It was 26" tires. I'm so high in the air, I have to get off the saddle to wait at red lights.

Thankfully I live one block from Central Park and just a few from the West Side Highway bikeway. I thought maybe this fall I'd ride to school everyday, but I'm not happy yet at all, even on Bike Lane streets. My high school (where I teach, no go) i on the campus of CCNY. Only 70 blocks from me, but uphill most of the way. And I'd be too sweaty. I sweat riding on the subway (TMI).

OK. Enough rambling. I like to talk about bikes and riding. I'll have lots of questions. Still need to by helmet and lock. Are cheap ($35) helments as protective as expensive helmets? Just more dorky looking and less ventilated?

Long post for a food board!
--mark
<Everyone has Problems, but Chemists have Solutions>

#30 g.johnson

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Posted 24 July 2005 - 03:38 AM

I commuted by bike for years in both London (scary) and New York (easy). I loved it. But I now live about 2.5 miles from work and the hassle of carrying the bike up and down stairs at both ends, and the complete change of clothing necessitated in all but the most benign of weathers has persuaded me to give it up. I now walk.

Still miss the bike, though.
The Obnoxious Glyn Johnson