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Farmer's Markets are now open!


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#121 little ms foodie

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Posted 12 February 2009 - 07:05 PM

QUOTE(Lauren @ Feb 9 2009, 04:29 PM) View Post
QUOTE(tsquare @ Feb 9 2009, 03:11 PM) View Post
QUOTE(little ms foodie @ Feb 9 2009, 03:00 PM) View Post
new vendor at Ballard market called Hot Cakes- they sell tiny jars that have molten chocolate cake batter in them. You take off the lid and pop it in the oven (in the jar) and you get a seriously dark and chocolately molten cake. they are using theo chocolates. very cute and delicious. they have little cakes that they sell also, they taste like big finacierres (sp)


That's Theo's flavor master Autumn Martin's new enterprise. her website


I thought I saw these at the U District a couple of weeks ago - but maybe not because it's not on her website. I swear I've seen them somewhere because I remember thinking they were quite expensive - like $8, does that sound right?


I asked if they were at other markets and they said on ballard but maybe they had them for sale elsewhere? $7 each, I thought it was ok priced, it's very good quality and I think a molten cake would go for $7 in a resto? And a theo bar is like $5 but with this I get a cute little jar to reuse- I'm a sucker for cute little jars!
Wendy.....Seattle, WA


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#122 tsquare

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Posted 12 February 2009 - 07:47 PM

They were $8 at Ballard last weekend. They do recommend sharing one for two.

#123 TamIam

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Posted 03 June 2009 - 08:28 PM

So much for elitist and overpriced.

Seattle area Farmers Market / Supermarket Price Comparison 2009 results were consistent with May 2007 and 2008 studies, which found farmers market prices to range from about one-third less to roughly equal in price to comparable organic produce at neighboring grocery stores and food co-ops. This is a powerful finding, especially since all the data is from Seattle area markets. The state Farmers Market Association recently observed that prices at Seattle markets are higher than in nearby communities, and prices in W Washington are higher than in E Washington.

Summary of 2009 Farmers Market / Supermarket Price Comparison quoted below:

Learning Statistics at the Local Farmers Market
Stacey Jones, Albers School of Business and Economics, Seattle University, June 2, 2009

“What’s a leek?” “What’s the closet thing in the grocery store to an Amish paste tomato?” Not the questions you typically encounter in teaching statistics.

My business statistics students at Seattle University and I have been tracking produce prices in Seattle farmers markets for three years. Many people seem to believe that farmers market prices are high. The data gathered by my students allow us to see how farmers market prices actually measure up against the price of comparable produce in grocery stores and food co-operatives. Our community partner for this project is the Neighborhood Farmers Market Alliance (NMFA). The NMFA was key in the initial development of Seattle’s farmers markets and now runs seven farmers markets in Seattle, two year-round (for more information on markets and locations see www.seattlefarmersmarkets.org).

This spring we measured prices at the Broadway and Columbia City farmers markets between May 10 and May 13.. Armed with pencils and clipboards, students collected data on organic produce prices at the farmers market and neighboring grocery stores and co-ops. We included in our analysis the prices of only those organic produce items that were available at least one of our comparison stores, ranging alphabetically from apples to turnips. All items were priced by weight (sometimes requiring asking a farmer’s permission to weigh a few bunches of asparagus or radishes).

On Capitol Hill, we compared the prices at the Broadway farmers market to those at Madison Market, QFC, and Safeway. The Broadway farmers market had the lowest average price for ten organic produce items available at all four locations. The average price of the ten common items was $4.40 per pound at the Broadway farmers market, $4.57 per pound at Madison Market, $5.82 per pound at QFC, and $8.04 per pound at Safeway. A pound of asparagus, for example, sold for $4.00 at the farmers market, $4.99 at Madison Market, $9.98 at QFC, and $4.79 at Safeway. To be sure, the farmers market did not offer the lowest price on every item, but did tend to have the lowest prices for produce in its peak season.

In Columbia City, we compared farmers market prices to those at the Seward Park Pacific Foods Co-op (PCC) and the Rainier Safeway. The Columbia City Farmers Market beat the local competition on price for ten common organic produce items. Even having removed some extreme values from the data (those organic herbs sold in 2-oz. packages at grocery stores are quite expensive when converted to pounds), the farmers market prices beat the competition. The ten produce items available at all three locations averaged $4.25 per pound at the Columbia City farmers market, $4.97 at PCC, and $4.70 at Safeway.
This year’s results were consistent with our May 2007 and 2008 studies, which found farmers market prices to range from about one-third less to roughly equal in price to comparable organic produce at neighboring grocery stores and food co-ops.

Seattle University students will be presenting the results of our studies at the Columbia City farmers market on Wednesday June 3, from 3 to 7 pm, and at the Broadway farmers market on Sunday June 7, from 11 to 3 pm. For more information on the spring 2009 studies and previous farmers market price studies, please contact me at sjones@seattleu.edu.

Oil and potatoes both grow underground so french fries may have eventually invented themselves had they not been invented. -- J. Esther

#124 Eden

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Posted 03 June 2009 - 11:10 PM

QUOTE(TamIam @ Jun 3 2009, 01:28 PM) View Post
So much for elitist and overpriced.

Seattle area Farmers Market / Supermarket Price Comparison 2009 results were consistent with May 2007 and 2008 studies, which found farmers market prices to range from about one-third less to roughly equal in price to comparable organic produce at neighboring grocery stores and food co-ops. This is a powerful finding, especially since all the data is from Seattle area markets. The state Farmers Market Association recently observed that prices at Seattle markets are higher than in nearby communities, and prices in W Washington are higher than in E Washington.

Thanks Tamara, I frequently wonder aboutthe price comparison...
A change of meat is often good, and those who are wearied of common food take new pleasure in a novel meal.
- Athenaeus

#125 tighe

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Posted 04 June 2009 - 09:26 PM

QUOTE(TamIam @ Jun 3 2009, 01:28 PM) View Post
So much for elitist and overpriced.


Well, at least not any more elitist and overpriced than grocery store organics... laugh.gif

I know Stacy from when I was also teaching business stats at SU and it's great to see students doing this kind of project, but to my mind, it doesn't address the most fundamental question.

The methodology they used was absolutely correct to conduct an apples to apples (pun intended) comparison. However, who is really surprised at the results? Farmers market vendors should be able to offer a lower price for comparable organics because they have much lower overhead and are cutting out 2 or 3 layers of intermediaries between farmer and consumer. The real question is whether or not it's realistic for all families to use farmers markets as their primary source of produce. The seasonal/local true believers would like you to believe that the answer is yes, but in my opinion, the answer is no. The fact is the alternative for most consumers isn't to buy organics at the grocery store, but to buy plain ol' carrots, etc. Compared to regular produce at grocery stores and most permanent produce stands, farmers markets are significantly more expensive. Granted, there is often (not always) a real quality difference, but if the question is putting enough food on the table for your family, quality is going to get sacrificed.
It may have been Camelot for Jack and Jacqueline
But on the Che Guevara highway filling up with gasoline
Fidel Castro's brother spies a rich lady who's crying
Over luxury's dissapointment
So he walks over and he's trying
To sympathize with her, but thinks that he should warn her
That the Thirld World is just around the corner

#126 tsquare

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Posted 05 June 2009 - 03:02 AM

QUOTE(TamIam @ Jun 3 2009, 01:28 PM) View Post
Seward Park Pacific Foods Co-op (PCC)


Might want to check your data - PCC is now PCC Natural Markets, while PCC stands for Puget Consumers Co-op.

#127 TamIam

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Posted 07 June 2009 - 01:26 AM

Tsquare - Not my data. The data and the write-up are from the study's author.

Tighe - I'm with you. If I had to watch every dime (used to be every penny before all that inflation-deflation stuff hit), I would probably take a pass on organic or naturally grown foods. And happily, I dont find myself in that position right now.

I dont think there is any one single answer to all of the problems created by the current industrialized food system. I'm not an all my eggs in one basket kind of girl, and our society shouldnt be an all one flavor kind of society. Sometimes folks talk like it is all one way or the other way, with no room for in-betweens or bits of everything. It makes for good argument, but it isn't reality.

We need some of what industrial ag and industrial food companies offer. We also need to re-develop local food systems that keep dollars and jobs floating around a local economy before making their way into the yachts and mansions of the coporate tycoons. Our communities also need to avoid being overly dependent on an overly centralized growing and distribution system. One bit of cow poop in the wrong place and millions around the country suddenly sick with e. coli. Deaths, market crashes, fear, over and over again. Which emergency shall it be this week?

Farmers markets and CDAs are a part of creating a viable alternative. Not for everyone, but enough to create its own viable (read: family wage jobs and good food) market niche. So are local food production companies. So is the multinational super-efficient fairly diverse and far-reaching industrialized system.

Industrial ag succeeded in bringing the cost of food to a very low level, which is (mostly) a good thing. It also created Monsanto, a compamny that seems bent on world domination of some kind. If they could patent the air you breathe and charge for it, they would.

Cheap ag's affordability comes at a price. Industrial ag and industrial food only remain cheap on a per pound retail basis because the true costs are dumped on others. Tighe - as an economist you know all about externalities, but most folks are not really aware of them. When an unlined manure lagoon contaminates drinking water, or fails and contaminates the fishery and surrounding land, and when the ammonia smell is heavy enough to make breathing in the neighborhood a real challenge, and when the pesticide runoff and mists kill birds and fishes, and residues exceed "safe" levels on our grocery store sheves, etc., etc., there is a cost that the business is dumping on to others. The cost is in the slow painful death of commercial and recreational fisheries. It is in more cancers and other health problems. It is in in the outrageously expensive and rarely successful attempts to resucitate a river and wetland system. And in additional taxpayer-funded costs to treat water so it is potable. The costs are real, and they are ginormous, but they do not show up in the store price. Naturally and sustainably raised foods dont create these problems, and as such, they arent being subsidized by neighbors or the larger community.

To really compare apples to organic apples takes a more complicated accounting far beyond the scope of that focused market basket study. Still, I find it fascinating that the farmers market basket study finds better pricing at farmers markets. Something I experience on a weekly basis, but that lots of folks find counter-intuitive.
Oil and potatoes both grow underground so french fries may have eventually invented themselves had they not been invented. -- J. Esther

#128 tighe

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Posted 09 June 2009 - 05:33 PM

QUOTE(TamIam @ Jun 6 2009, 06:26 PM) View Post
We also need to re-develop local food systems that keep dollars and jobs floating around a local economy before making their way into the yachts and mansions of the coporate tycoons.


While I appreciate your point, craftsmen and workers whose livlihoods depend on building yachts and mansions might disagree. wink.gif I find it fascinating how many people compartmentalize the food/ag sector from the rest of the economy. So much talk about 'eating local', but if you told someone they should only buy clothes made within 100 miles of their home, they'd look at you like you were insane. To me, they're both economic goods, so why the different treatment? Are small farmers more noble that the woodworker or drywall installer?

QUOTE(TamIam @ Jun 6 2009, 06:26 PM) View Post
Our communities also need to avoid being overly dependent on an overly centralized growing and distribution system. One bit of cow poop in the wrong place and millions around the country suddenly sick with e. coli. Deaths, market crashes, fear, over and over again. Which emergency shall it be this week?

Farmers markets and CDAs are a part of creating a viable alternative. Not for everyone, but enough to create its own viable (read: family wage jobs and good food) market niche. So are local food production companies. So is the multinational super-efficient fairly diverse and far-reaching industrialized system.

Industrial ag succeeded in bringing the cost of food to a very low level, which is (mostly) a good thing. It also created Monsanto, a compamny that seems bent on world domination of some kind. If they could patent the air you breathe and charge for it, they would.

Cheap ag's affordability comes at a price. Industrial ag and industrial food only remain cheap on a per pound retail basis because the true costs are dumped on others. Tighe - as an economist you know all about externalities, but most folks are not really aware of them. When an unlined manure lagoon contaminates drinking water, or fails and contaminates the fishery and surrounding land, and when the ammonia smell is heavy enough to make breathing in the neighborhood a real challenge, and when the pesticide runoff and mists kill birds and fishes, and residues exceed "safe" levels on our grocery store sheves, etc., etc., there is a cost that the business is dumping on to others. The cost is in the slow painful death of commercial and recreational fisheries. It is in more cancers and other health problems. It is in in the outrageously expensive and rarely successful attempts to resucitate a river and wetland system. And in additional taxpayer-funded costs to treat water so it is potable. The costs are real, and they are ginormous, but they do not show up in the store price. Naturally and sustainably raised foods dont create these problems, and as such, they arent being subsidized by neighbors or the larger community.

To really compare apples to organic apples takes a more complicated accounting far beyond the scope of that focused market basket study. Still, I find it fascinating that the farmers market basket study finds better pricing at farmers markets. Something I experience on a weekly basis, but that lots of folks find counter-intuitive.


Externalities? Oh yeah, I think I remember those. laugh.gif The single biggest thing that could be done to reduce those externalities would be for the goverment to stop incenting the overproduction of food, by eliminating agricultural subsidies. Everybody, except corporate farmers, wins on that one. Stricter and more rigorously enforced standards on the use of pesticides and pollution by agricultural operations are also needed. Of course, the political power of big ag is the obstacle to both of these. And in terms of enhancing diversity, I would love to see that money put towards helping the hallowed family farmer transition from producing standard commodity crops to producing specialty crops, which is more likely to provide a livable income at smaller scale.

People also need to be realistic about the externalities created by the local ag/farmers market model. Some interesting studies have been done that point out inefficiencies in the model that lead to a much larger 'carbon footprint' in distribution and transportation than the big farm to grocery store model. Going to the farmers market generates an extra trip in a car for many people and those goods were transported in small quantities, so the amount of gas per pound of food that ends up at your home is much higher than for the stuff that arrived at the grocery store via semi truck and that you bought along with all the other items that aren't available at the farmers market.

It may have been Camelot for Jack and Jacqueline
But on the Che Guevara highway filling up with gasoline
Fidel Castro's brother spies a rich lady who's crying
Over luxury's dissapointment
So he walks over and he's trying
To sympathize with her, but thinks that he should warn her
That the Thirld World is just around the corner

#129 TamIam

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Posted 09 June 2009 - 08:29 PM

Great points Tighe. I always appreciate your kind of deep thoughts and good questions. The world needs more like you cool.gif
Oil and potatoes both grow underground so french fries may have eventually invented themselves had they not been invented. -- J. Esther

#130 Eden

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 12:01 AM

Had a lovely sunny afternoon meander through the market today, and it is very much in that transition moment between the end of summer and the beginning of Fall.

I brought home a big bag of San Marzanos to make into sauce, sweet corn and juicy nectarines, along with a truly perfect Spartan apple (yes samples sell product!) a forerunner of many other great apples to come over the winter.
I resisted the delicata squash despite strong temptation (it will still be there later) along with lots of kale that's making me look forward to ribollita as the weather turns.

We also finally tried the little Whidbey Island IceCream cart. the cardamom bar was very tasty & the cardomom went perfectly with the chocolate coating, but I don't think I'd buy the actual ice-cream, it was not creamy enough for my spoiled tastes...
A change of meat is often good, and those who are wearied of common food take new pleasure in a novel meal.
- Athenaeus

#131 little ms foodie

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Posted 11 October 2009 - 10:29 PM

I stocked up on berries today , strawberries, blackberries and raspberries... they are all in the freezer to be enjoyed throughout the winter!

lots of really ripe tomatoes for you canners. And leeks, potatoes and dahlias smile.gif
Wendy.....Seattle, WA


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#132 little ms foodie

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Posted 01 November 2009 - 09:19 PM

sunchokes are in and I tasted a really nice raspberry vinegar today

among other things I picked up some cream from Golden Glen Creamery and pasta from the charming Italian. yum.
Wendy.....Seattle, WA


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#133 christy

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Posted 02 November 2009 - 06:09 AM

There's a donut stand at the Ballard Farmer's Market now--they have one of those contraptions that makes mini donuts, like Daily Dozen!

#134 tighe

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Posted 24 May 2010 - 10:57 PM

Not strictly a farmer's market, but I'm psyched that there will soon be a Sunday outdoor Latino market in Burien!

El Tianguis Mercado Latino
It may have been Camelot for Jack and Jacqueline
But on the Che Guevara highway filling up with gasoline
Fidel Castro's brother spies a rich lady who's crying
Over luxury's dissapointment
So he walks over and he's trying
To sympathize with her, but thinks that he should warn her
That the Thirld World is just around the corner

#135 tighe

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Posted 11 August 2010 - 04:25 PM

Not strictly a farmer's market, but I'm psyched that there will soon be a Sunday outdoor Latino market in Burien!

<a href="http://www.b-townblo...burien-sunday/" target="_blank">El Tianguis Mercado Latino</a>


Good article about the market in the Times today. Still searching for a crticial mass of vendors, but a great place for lunch.
It may have been Camelot for Jack and Jacqueline
But on the Che Guevara highway filling up with gasoline
Fidel Castro's brother spies a rich lady who's crying
Over luxury's dissapointment
So he walks over and he's trying
To sympathize with her, but thinks that he should warn her
That the Thirld World is just around the corner