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Andre's Hungarian


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#1 omnivorette

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Posted 10 October 2005 - 05:02 AM

We grabbed dinner here tonight between movies, and we were very pleasantly surprised. I had a quite respectable veal goulash with nokedli - flavorful, not too much sauce, tender but not overcooked meat - and the nokedli (that's Hungarian for spaetzle) were just right. Glass of egri bikaver, so-so cucumber salad, and a nice piece of poppyseed strudel for dessert.

Eyebrows had one of the specials - potatoes and eggs and sausage baked in layers - no sauce - very browned and roasted, and quite nice. He had a piece of mocha apricot cake - way too sweet.

Next time I will try the chicken paprikash.

The food is a bazillion times better than that nightmare Mocca Hungarian (which is now combined with the equally nightmarish Frankie's - avoid).

And plenty of Hungarians in there - many of the patrons, and all the servers. Did my heart good.


It's on 2nd Ave. near 85th St.
"It seems a positively Quixotic quest to defend food from being used as any kind of social signifier, as if it could avoid the fate of each other component of our everyday lives." -Wilfrid

#2 Ampelman

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Posted 28 December 2005 - 08:51 PM

Omni recommended Andre's during dinner at Blaue Gans a couple of weeks ago, and Nora Ephron's mention of the place in her wonderful "Lost Strudel" NYT op-ed piece today spurred me to give it a try.

They have a take-out/bakery area in the front with a glass case full of very delicious looking cakes, pastries and strudels; further back are tables for sit-down service.

I had -- what else? -- the cabbage strudel, preceded by soup (which today was gulaschsuppe). The latter was average; while it had plenty of vegetables and tender beef, it could definitely have used a flavor boost (i.e. more browned onions and garlic, a richer broth, and some discernible paprika taste!).

All was forgotten upon the arrival of the strudel -- a generous (4+") slice with a burnished, shatteringly-crisp top. Cutting into it with the serrated knife produced that marvelous crunching sound until the blade hit the soft, savory filling. It really was incredibly delicious. The finely-chopped filling was piping hot, not too sweet (as cabbage can sometimes be) and well-seasoned, and the pastry was crisp, flaky and tender. I'm not sure whether the moisture in the filling came from broth or lashings of melted butter (OK, I kind of am sure, but would rather not think about it). Still, it did not seem greasy in terms of mouthfeel -- in fact, it tasted surprisingly light.

Among the pastry selections are Dobos Torte, Sachertorte, Linzertorte, Palascinta, Floden and Rigó Jancsi (chocolate cream slices).

Even though the place was by no means crowded, table service was glacially slow. On the flip side, patrons at the bakery counter received patient and cordial service from the two Hungarian women who, it turned out, doubled as the waitresses.

The soup + strudel was a lunch special that goes for $6.95. The menu includes expected standbys such as goulash, stuffed cabbage, wiener schnitzel and chicken paprikash along with many things I would never order in a place like this (wraps, paninis, nachos, burgers, chili). No matter: the strudel alone justifies a visit. It also comes in apple, cherry, poppyseed and cheese, and is sold whole ($16), half ($8) and the aforementioned jumbo slice ($4.95).

Needless to say, the cabbage version was flying off the shelf today.

Andre's Cafe. 1631 Second Ave. (84th/85th). 7 days, 7am-12:30am. (212) 327-1105. Cash only.
"Cheryomushki, Cheryomushki
Shall bloom a thousand blooms
Of happiness and dreams come true,
In a thousand concrete rooms!"

#3 Suzanne F

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Posted 28 December 2005 - 08:59 PM

$6.95? :rolleyes: Gonna have to remember that the next time I go to the Met! Thanks!!

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#4 StephanieL

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 05:24 PM

The cabbage streudel is quite something. It's simultaneously sweet and peppery (almost a little too peppery), and very oily but not greasy-tasting. I had a half of that jumbo slice for lunch and it was more than enough.

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#5 Salli Vates

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 03:42 PM

Is this the last Hungarian restaurant in NYC? I think there used to be a place in College Point, Queens, but it closed.

#6 Sneakeater

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 03:45 PM

There used to be a whole bunch of them right around where Andre's is. But no longer.
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#7 omnivorette

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 03:45 PM

There is also Caterina's in the east 50s.
"It seems a positively Quixotic quest to defend food from being used as any kind of social signifier, as if it could avoid the fate of each other component of our everyday lives." -Wilfrid

#8 omnivorette

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 03:46 PM

QUOTE(Sneakeater @ Sep 19 2007, 11:45 AM) View Post
There used to be a whole bunch of them right around where Andre's is. But no longer.



Mocca was the Hungarian one. The rest were German. (Kleine Konditerei, etc)
"It seems a positively Quixotic quest to defend food from being used as any kind of social signifier, as if it could avoid the fate of each other component of our everyday lives." -Wilfrid

#9 Sneakeater

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 03:48 PM

There were more than Mocca. God, what's the name of the particular place I'm thinking of? It was on the other side of the street from Mocca. (And it was one of several.) Maybe (god forbid) I'm older than you?????????????
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#10 Nathan

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 03:48 PM

isn't the Hungarian Women's social club still around?

(one of those strange certain day a week places...which can be quite good. another is the excellent smorgasboard at the Norwegian Seaman's Church (but since it serves lots of smoked and poached fish I'm concluding that it's actually Jewish) tongue.gif
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#11 omnivorette

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 03:50 PM

It's called the Hungarian Literary Society, and I'm not sure if there is public-access cooking happening anymore. For a while there was a mother-daughter team, the same ones who owned the place in Queens, but they left. And anyway the food was lousy. But the scene was fabulous.
"It seems a positively Quixotic quest to defend food from being used as any kind of social signifier, as if it could avoid the fate of each other component of our everyday lives." -Wilfrid

#12 omnivorette

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 03:52 PM

QUOTE(Sneakeater @ Sep 19 2007, 11:48 AM) View Post
There were more than Mocca. God, what's the name of the particular place I'm thinking of? It was on the other side of the street from Mocca. (And it was one of several.) Maybe (god forbid) I'm older than you?????????????



I don't think so. I think the rest were German. Ideal, Kleine Konditorei, of course Heidelberg is still there. Lichtmann's was a wonderful bakery, but that was on the west side. That was sort of an Austro-Hungarian bakery.


"It seems a positively Quixotic quest to defend food from being used as any kind of social signifier, as if it could avoid the fate of each other component of our everyday lives." -Wilfrid

#13 omnivorette

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 04:01 PM

eta: there were others, but not up toward 86th St. They were on 79th St., which is where the Hungarian Literary Society is.


"It seems a positively Quixotic quest to defend food from being used as any kind of social signifier, as if it could avoid the fate of each other component of our everyday lives." -Wilfrid

#14 Sneakeater

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 04:01 PM

No no no no. This place, we'd have brains and eggs for an appetizer. Then chicken with paprika. Then, palischenken (sp????). Not German.

Could it have been called Magyar?
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#15 omnivorette

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 04:01 PM

We used to go to the Red Tulip when I was a kid. I still miss it.
"It seems a positively Quixotic quest to defend food from being used as any kind of social signifier, as if it could avoid the fate of each other component of our everyday lives." -Wilfrid