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#5011 Wilfrid

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Posted 01 June 2017 - 08:58 PM

Recent and current:
 
J.K. Huysmans, The Road from Decadence: From Brothel to Cloister (letters).

Jack Kerouac, The Unknown Kerouac (including translations of pieces written in French, his first language).

David Arkell, Looking for Laforgue.

Jules Laforgue, "Derniers Vers."

Edmund Husserl, Crisis of the European Sciences.

S.S. Van Dine, The Benson Murder Case (re-read: the first Philo Vance novel).

Compton Mackenzie, Sinister Street.

Ben Lerner, No Art (collected poems).

Rae Armantrout, Entanglements (poems).

 

This has all been eating into my Godfather-watching time.



#5012 Wilfrid

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Posted 27 June 2017 - 01:21 AM

With Shifting Landscape I think I'll be done with Henry Roth. A collection of short pieces of all kinds over many years, there's plenty of junk. A couple of glowing short stories. Some personal and political commentary which only was commissioned and published because of Call It Sleep.

Roth's biography introduced me to John A. Williams, and The Man Who Cried I Am is a crushing howl of pain. Passages are as difficult as anything in Selby (but he's nothing like Selby). His books sold in 1960s/70s, he died in 2015. Forgotten?



#5013 taion

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Posted 27 June 2017 - 02:45 AM

I finally finished reading Swann's Way a bit ago. Trying to finish The Man Who Was Thursday now, maybe.


I didn't tip at Per Se either.

#5014 hollywood

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Posted 27 June 2017 - 02:35 PM

Al Franken's Giant of the Senate.  Has insights as to how things get done (and fail to happen) in our Senate.  Also, lots of stuff about Minnesota including bean feeds (sounds like a job for RG).


Then that happened.


#5015 Wilfrid

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Posted 27 June 2017 - 04:22 PM

I see the New Yorker just reviewed the "new" book about A.E. Housman which I commented on here back in January.

 

My habit of dropping the "e" in Houseman is deplorable.  Okay, actually I was right.



#5016 taion

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Posted 19 July 2017 - 06:21 PM

Well, I finally read Pride and Prejudice. I think I had the worst high school English lit class ever.


I didn't tip at Per Se either.

#5017 bloviatrix

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Posted 20 July 2017 - 12:52 AM

Just finished Heretics by Leonardo Paduro who is considered one of Cuba's greatest living novelist. Slow going but interesting - revolved around tracing the disappearance of a missing Rembrandt study. But really had to do with the concept of free will and belief.


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#5018 Wilfrid

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Posted 20 July 2017 - 01:02 AM

Is that more mainstream fiction than his police thrillers?

Just finished 1934, Moravia's yarn of sex and suicide among the fascists, set on the Isle of Capri.

#5019 bloviatrix

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Posted 20 July 2017 - 02:20 AM

Is that more mainstream fiction than his police thrillers?

Just finished 1934, Moravia's yarn of sex and suicide among the fascists, set on the Isle of Capri.

It features Mario Conde who is the detective in the thrillers. Not sure what you mean by mainstream. I can't imagine this would appeal to a huge audience - although I convinced one of my colleagues to read it (but he's a writer/playwright)


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#5020 Wilfrid

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Posted 20 July 2017 - 01:31 PM

I had thought of him as a thriller genre writer, like Jean-Claude Izzo, which is not necessarily a bad thing.  And indeed the line between that and "literature" is increasingly blurry.



#5021 Lippy

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Posted Yesterday, 03:20 PM

I an not generally a fan of either mysteries or historical fiction (The Name of the Rose being an exception) but I found myself enjoying City of Masks, by S.D. Sykes, probably more for its depiction of 14th-century Venice than the mystery plot.  I've requested her first book, Plague Land, from the library.